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  1. #131
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    Zombie_eyes is offline Formerly Diamondeyes
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    Default Do you believe in homework?

    Its just hard river; school takes a lot out of him. It takes upto an hour in the afternoon to do ot calming techniques 30 min speech work. Then its upto an hour of home work and reading because he isnt the fastest then its dinner bath bed... He isnt getting a break >_<

  2. #132
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    Default Do you believe in homework?

    Re exercise the teacher makes them do exercise everyday at school. Sport, running, yoga etc so im not fussed about making him so it at home given his low muscle tone condition. I just sign off on that (lie) but yeah its stepped up a big notch and lil guy is struggling... Time for a school meeting i think

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    Homework in high school is very different from homework in primary. It is really disheartening to hear all these stories of little kids hating school and feeling overwhelmed. And for what? There has been no scientific evidence that shows that kids who do homework at a young age fare better than those that don't.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-10-2...-value/4330514

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    I agree with the above poster, homework does not always equal better learning outcomes for our kids.

    Some of the homework described sounds ok like project and activity based tasks but I struggle when sheets of photocopied activity sheets come home that do not relate to what was taught in class that day or week.

    I don't have any issue with spelling and reading as that reinforces current work and develops reading strategies. I think small chunks of homework is okay but not if the child is tired or not coping.

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  7. #135
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    Default Do you believe in homework?

    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    Homework in high school is very different from homework in primary. It is really disheartening to hear all these stories of little kids hating school and feeling overwhelmed. And for what? There has been no scientific evidence that shows that kids who do homework at a young age fare better than those that don't.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-10-2...-value/4330514
    My understanding is that homework rose in popularity a few decades ago, when more elite schools felt it would give them a competitive edge. Do more work, we'll get better results... Surely?

    And we persist with this assumption. The problem is that it's never actually been tested. I've seen several people in this thread say they want to give their child an edge or help them to excel. But why do you assume doing schoolwork at home is the answer? Why assume they can't excel while learning schoolwork at... erm... school?

    In reality there's only so much a brain can retain at any given point; give it more than that and you can actually impair learning. We know much more about brains and learning than we did a few decades ago when those ambitious schoolmasters started sending work home by the kilo, our curriculum and teaching methods should reflect this.
    Last edited by lambjam; 19-02-2013 at 09:18.

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    I think the idea that there are blanket times for homework in high school is a bit far fetched. In year 12 I did the humanities subjects - gender studies, English, etc. I did one math subject. For math, the homework was extremely minimal - I got all of that done during study time at school. For the humanities I did hours upon hours upon hours of essay writing and research. There is no way to 'set' homework time for those subjects because I had to do my own research, critical thinking, writers block, etc. I hated year 12 with a passion, I barely slept and had next to no social life. Now, I don't claim to be the brightest crayon in the box, so this is why it's not as easy for all students in high school.

    I find that even in year 1 the homework is too much for my DS (and us!). They don't take into consideration family circumstances and the fact that my DS has little downtime in the evenings.. .I don't see the point in forcing him to read a book that he doesn't want to or writing a few words at night when we could go back to reading our normal books and having enjoyable family time. They say it should only take ten minutes. Pfft. Ten minutes indeed.

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    School should be less about memorising facts and more about learning to learn, create, develop ideas, test theories, find answers and confirm that the answers are true.

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    Default Do you believe in homework?

    Quote Originally Posted by BlissedOut View Post
    School should be less about memorising facts and more about learning to learn, create, develop ideas, test theories, find answers and confirm that the answers are true.
    I think memorising is more in high school, although, it does have its place. In primary school, we strive to teach children to be lifelong learners, but certain few things need to be memorised, and I don't see anything wrong with that as long as children are given opportunities to learn in a variety of ways.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lambjam View Post
    My understanding is that homework rose in popularity a few decades ago, when more elite schools felt it would give them a competitive edge. Do more work, we'll get better results... Surely?

    And we persist with this assumption. The problem is that it's never actually been tested. I've seen several people in this thread say they want to give their child an edge or help them to excel. But why do you assume doing schoolwork at home is the answer? Why assume they can't excel while learning schoolwork at... erm... school?

    In reality there's only so much a brain can retain at any given point; give it more than that and you can actually impair learning. We know much more about brains and learning than we did a few decades ago when those ambitious schoolmasters started sending work home by the kilo, our curriculum and teaching methods should reflect this.
    The kids that are at the top of DDs class all do either tutoring or homework at home.
    DD is sitting for selective school exams and school will not prepare her for that.
    I can not rely on school alone. It's not enough in my opinion.
    There are kids in her class that can't times or divide double numbers.
    There are kids who don't know their times tables.
    How do you expect me to rely on the education system. When DD goes overseas the work she has from school here is at least two years behind them.
    (that just goes to show you how behind we are)
    International uni student make fun of how easy uni here is.
    Maybe it's different in private schools, I don't know I can't afford one but Im trying my best to educate my child. I can not rely on just school alone. They do not study for much at school. Half the time they are playing sport or doing something else. Which is fine but how is my DD supposed to get into a good high school. I can't afford high private school fees.
    If I didn't study with my child there is no way she would be where she is now... Not a chance.
    Each to their own as parents we only want what is best for our kids and we all have to make our own decisions.
    I firmly believe that my effort is paying off and I don't need the a study to prove that because I see it everyday.

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    Default Do you believe in homework?

    Quote Originally Posted by Janesmum123 View Post
    The kids that are at the top of DDs class all do either tutoring or homework at home.
    DD is sitting for selective school exams and school will not prepare her for that.
    I can not rely on school alone. It's not enough in my opinion.
    There are kids in her class that can't times or divide double numbers.
    There are kids who don't know their times tables.
    How do you expect me to rely on the education system. When DD goes overseas the work she has from school here is at least two years behind them.
    (that just goes to show you how behind we are)
    International uni student make fun of how easy uni here is.
    Maybe it's different in private schools, I don't know I can't afford one but Im trying my best to educate my child. I can not rely on just school alone. They do not study for much at school. Half the time they are playing sport or doing something else. Which is fine but how is my DD supposed to get into a good high school. I can't afford high private school fees.
    If I didn't study with my child there is no way she would be where she is now... Not a chance.
    Each to their own as parents we only want what is best for our kids and we all have to make our own decisions.
    I firmly believe that my effort is paying off and I don't need the a study to prove that because I see it everyday.
    Your child doesn't need to go to a selective school or a private school, and it shouldn't be the school's job to prepare your child for a selective school exam anyway.

    Your encouragement and interest in her learning will be enough to get her through any high school.
    Last edited by BigRedV; 19-02-2013 at 20:56.


 

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