+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    13,069
    Thanks
    9,846
    Thanked
    12,957
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week

    Default Labour's flexible work arrangements and Julie Bishop's 'Women can't have it all'

    Quote Originally Posted by Chew the Mintie View Post
    I absolutely agree with Shelle that we need to abandon this ridiculous 9-5 business. It's totally artificial.

    The amount of talent and potential being squandered because we make it impossible for women is shocking.

    I should also point out I run a business from bed with a laptop and a newborn. I drive an old car and spend money on cleaners. Think outside the box.
    Not all businesses can be run from a bed.

    Employers need to frame their operating hours around what's best for the customers and the business as a whole, not female employees with kids.

    I don't think we make it impossible for women to work. There's daycare, before and after school care and generous government handouts.

    If a woman is finding it difficult to work perhaps it's because she (and not an employer) is not thinking outside the box.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    4,125
    Thanks
    1,810
    Thanked
    1,694
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I agree that women can't 'have it all' generally speaking. Yes, in some circumstances, some women can, but as a general rule, one or the other will suffer, as you can't physically be doing both at the same time. That doesn't mean you can't work and raise kids, but working 'flexible hours' is usually choosing your family, rather than working up the ranks. Choosing to work long hours in order to have a great career inevitably means putting your children in care at a young age, for those long hours.

    I don't think men can have it all either. Yes working men have kids at home, but they are away from them more than they are with them, which to me is choosing the career.

    Please note, I am not saying that working parents love their kids less or anything like that.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Annabella For This Useful Post:

    CupidsVictim  (13-02-2013)

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,935
    Thanks
    393
    Thanked
    1,325
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Labour's flexible work arrangements and Julie Bishop's 'Women can't have it all'

    Vic park you miss my point entirely.

    Obviously not all businesses can be run from bed. I deliberately structure my business so I can. I *started* my business with a baby. Play the game by your own rules, not by rules set 50 years ago before Internet, before laptops, and when every worker had a wife at home.

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,935
    Thanks
    393
    Thanked
    1,325
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Labour's flexible work arrangements and Julie Bishop's 'Women can't have it all'

    Any business or industry with rigid work hours and inability to adapt is going to go bust anyway.

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    13,069
    Thanks
    9,846
    Thanked
    12,957
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week

    Default Labour's flexible work arrangements and Julie Bishop's 'Women can't have it all'

    Quote Originally Posted by Chew the Mintie View Post
    Vic park you miss my point entirely.

    Obviously not all businesses can be run from bed. I deliberately structure my business so I can. I *started* my business with a baby. Play the game by your own rules, not by rules set 50 years ago before Internet, before laptops, and when every worker had a wife at home.
    And you miss my point entirely: 9-5 work isn't the kiss of death for women, there are plenty of support options out there.


    Good on you for starting your own business. But I really dont think a woman needs to start up her own business in order to work for a living. 9-5 jobs dont kill women and children. Even if 9-5 isnt your cup of tea there are flexible options out there (night/weekend work).

    Assuming running your own business was the only way to make it work... Not everyone is in a position where they can make their own luck like you have. They may lack funds, they may lack skills. Or their skills may be tailored to a business which can't be run from bed.

  7. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,935
    Thanks
    393
    Thanked
    1,325
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Labour's flexible work arrangements and Julie Bishop's 'Women can't have it all'

    No, of course not. But I actually don't think anyone should work 9-5 for the best life they can have... And I don't think you need to. These days technology and new ways of doing things mean loads of industries can be opened up to a more flexible way of doing things. Maybe you do 2 days in a team environment and 2 days from home. Or 2 half days a week during the day and another half shift at night. Whatever, it's all possible. Maybe not in every case, but there's huge potential for flexibility that isn't currently utilised.

  8. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    747
    Thanks
    132
    Thanked
    395
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Ok thank you. I kind of agree with her though. I don't see how you could do a job like that and have kids unless your partner is willing to be the primary carer. Take the prime minister, how would she have done the job she does and be a mother? She travels extensively, is at work I imagine for many many hours in the day, so her partner would be the one who does all the child and school stuff. That's what I would imagine. Its easier for a man if he has a partner look after the kids.
    I think women can have careers and home life, depends on the job though and the hours you have to do. Even if you have your kids in full time care and your out the door at 7am, home by 6pm That's not really having it all *to me* I'd feel like a part time mum and would miss out on way too much. I'd like to be there for the kids before and after school and not just 1-2 hours before bed in which time I'm spending getting dinner ready or getting ready for the morning.

    Seems too much for me and not the life I would want to live.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Someones Mummy For This Useful Post:

    Annabella  (10-02-2013)

  10. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    10,469
    Thanks
    3,190
    Thanked
    6,496
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts

    Default Labour's flexible work arrangements and Julie Bishop's 'Women can't have it all'

    We own a small business, we employ 8 staff - 5 are mums, 2 single and I think we are very pro family and are as flexible as our industry allows but unfortunately most consumers ( plus solicitors/banks/tradespeople ) work mon-fri 9-5.30 so our admin support staff have to be in the office at these times - our sales and property management staff obviously have to work when their clients want them to which is a lot of after 6pm appointments and weekend work ( not ideal for families but thats the choice they make when joining this industry)
    if any government was to tell me I had to be more flexible ( than we already are) we would lose clients, then money, then obviously staff

  11. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,311
    Thanks
    2,387
    Thanked
    4,599
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts

    Default Labour's flexible work arrangements and Julie Bishop's 'Women can't have it all'

    Slightly OT, but I often wonder about the phrase 'having it all' when talking about balancing career and family demands.

    I think 'doing it all' is far more accurate.

    Having a career and a family is only 'having it all' if that is what you actually want, isn't it?

    FWIW, I believe women can do it all if they want to - or have to - but it took me a long time to realise that it's also ok not to want to.

    I've seen some fantastic examples of flexible working arrangements for women (and men) and I hope it does become the norm for workplaces to think outside the box.

    Someone earlier mentioned employees needing to think outside the box and I think that's a valid point. A couple I know of job share year on/year off. That's not an arrangement that would ordinarily be offered by an employer but because they proposed it and presented it carefully to their employer they have been able to do it. Obviously, that's not something everyone can do, but it's an example of employees thinking outside the box and employers being flexible enough to adopt a different approach.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to NancyBlackett For This Useful Post:

    Mod-pegasus  (14-02-2013)

  13. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,935
    Thanks
    393
    Thanked
    1,325
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I agree, obvioulsy nobody can 'have it all', or even 'do it all'. We all set priorities.

    I would love to have been an astronaut.
    I would love to do a phd
    I would love to be a famous author
    I would love to have met 10 of my own kids (ie had 10 kids)
    I would love overseas holidays every 6 months
    I would love to have amazonian fitness
    I would love an exciting and culturally enriching social life

    I don't think anybody can do all those things.

    I do however think that the capability exists in our society for many people, men and women, to experience some sense of achievement, fulfilment and balance in both vocation and family.

    Having a successful career doesn't mean spending 80 hours a week at work, and being a fulfilled mother doesn't mean being a sahm.

  14. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Chew the Mintie For This Useful Post:

    Benji  (10-02-2013),MissMuppet  (14-02-2013),Mod-pegasus  (14-02-2013),NancyBlackett  (10-02-2013),SPC  (13-02-2013)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Flexible working arrangements return to work
    By rosycheeks in forum Maternity & Parental Leave
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 18-07-2012, 16:22
  2. Return to work flexible working arrangements
    By Natalie86 in forum Maternity & Parental Leave
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 24-05-2012, 09:07

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
sales & new stuffsee all
Obstetrician, Gynaecologist, IVF Specialist
Dr Terry Sheahan - Brisbane Obstetrician, Gynaecologist, IVF Specialist
Dr Terry Sheahan is a highly respected Obstetrician, Gynaecologist and IVF Specialist on Brisbane's Northside. To book an appointment or for information about his Affordable Low-Gaps Obstetrics please call his rooms on (07) 3353 3100
featured supporter
Melbourne Natural Medicine Clinic
Leading natural health practitioners in fertility, preconception, pregnancy, and children's health. We take an integrative approach all health professionals and offer diagnostic testing and natural treatment options suitable for the whole family.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!