+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,109
    Thanks
    1,604
    Thanked
    2,085
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default Re: Why do they teach victorian cursive handwriting?

    Vic, WA and one other state (sorry can't remember which) learn Vic Modern Cursive if they are following curriculum. Learning running writing is in the Australian Curriculum from (I think) about year 3. So typically they start with the not joined up letters (open b, p, flicks) then start to join later.

    Running writing is much faster than printing and most essay exams are still handwritten. (basic answer to OP's question)

    Children need to be exposed to texts in many situations (eg. Computer screen, books, signs etc) and part of that is becoming fluent in reading many fonts and linking it to existing letter knowledge. Eg. My 5 year old DD has had to learn that there are two common lower case a's - the circle and stick or the backwards r with a smaller circle under - and that both can be written with tails or not but they are all the same letter. This is all part of learning literacy.

    Sent from my GT-S5830 using BubHub

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,109
    Thanks
    1,604
    Thanked
    2,085
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default Re: Why do they teach victorian cursive handwriting?

    Sorry when I say running writing is faster I mean faster to write, not necessarily faster to learn.

    Sent from my GT-S5830 using BubHub

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    6,718
    Thanks
    3,789
    Thanked
    3,838
    Reviews
    17
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 14/11/14100 Posts in a week

    Default Re: Why do they teach victorian cursive handwriting?

    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post
    I'm a midwife and all of our notes in patients charts are handwritten. Being able to write in neat cursive means it takes me half as long to do my daily notes then it would if I was printing etc.

    And I'm not being overly dramatic when I say that neat handwriting saves lives. Being able to read a medication order or the previous notes in an emergency (or really just in general) is paramount.
    I'm not disputing the fact it is quicker. Just that teaching young kids at a very early age is very difficult. Especially when also teaching computer skills at the same time. Dd1 would often ask where the p was or where the b was on the key board and when I showed her she would disagree because the round bits were closed unlike vc. Vc, while similar, isn't quite "running writing". Running writing is linked, vc is not. Our school have started teaching vc in the beginning then reverting to printing in the older age groups once they know the alphabet and basic words because it its easier.

    Sent from my magical black talky thingy using bubhub

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    6,718
    Thanks
    3,789
    Thanked
    3,838
    Reviews
    17
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 14/11/14100 Posts in a week

    Default Re: Why do they teach victorian cursive handwriting?

    http://www.google.com.au/search?q=vi...&bih=455#i=226

    the variations are different between each state

    Sent from my magical black talky thingy using bubhub

  5. #15
    αληθη's Avatar
    αληθη is offline BH name read as Aleethee
    Winner 2012 - One most likely to be hacked by Nomsie
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    2,961
    Thanks
    3,031
    Thanked
    805
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default Why do they teach victorian cursive handwriting?

    Quote Originally Posted by headoverfeet View Post
    I fail to see why we need to learn running writing in general. I would guess yes it does improve fine motor skills but I still fail to see why we teach them something that isn't used anymore? I don't ever remember using it in high school
    We're still taught it because writing essays in exam conditions in high school and uni require a quick hand and running writing is quicker than printing (or so my year 10 English teacher said that's why we had to). Makes sense to me anyway after having to write a million essays in an hour.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    269
    Thanks
    207
    Thanked
    124
    Reviews
    2
    In my opinion Victorian cursive is ridiculous! I'm all for learning cursive writing, but when Preps are trying to get their heads around learning which letter is which and then matching it with written text... where else do they encounter those funny looking b's and p's and r's and z's. The Queensland way of teaching handwriting makes much more sense -- basic printing in the first year, add flourishes the second year, start joining third or fourth year.
    And for what it's worth, I believe to have nice, legible handwriting is an asset. I don't subscribe to the "everything is done on computers/phones/technical device these days" argument -- but perhaps I'm just a dinosaur. However, this dinosaur will have children who have nice, neat legible handwriting.

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to kbf2plus2 For This Useful Post:

    αληθη  (05-02-2013),VanityFey  (06-02-2013)

  8. #17
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    7,878
    Thanks
    3,397
    Thanked
    5,160
    Reviews
    8
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    Vic, WA and one other state (sorry can't remember which) learn Vic Modern Cursive if they are following curriculum. Learning running writing is in the Australian Curriculum from (I think) about year 3. So typically they start with the not joined up letters (open b, p, flicks) then start to join later.

    Running writing is much faster than printing and most essay exams are still handwritten. (basic answer to OP's question)

    Children need to be exposed to texts in many situations (eg. Computer screen, books, signs etc) and part of that is becoming fluent in reading many fonts and linking it to existing letter knowledge. Eg. My 5 year old DD has had to learn that there are two common lower case a's - the circle and stick or the backwards r with a smaller circle under - and that both can be written with tails or not but they are all the same letter. This is all part of learning literacy.

    Sent from my GT-S5830 using BubHub
    All of this. I'm interested in finding out why you wouldn't teach it...

  9. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,109
    Thanks
    1,604
    Thanked
    2,085
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by DesperatelySeekingSleep View Post
    I'm not disputing the fact it is quicker. Just that teaching young kids at a very early age is very difficult. Especially when also teaching computer skills at the same time. Dd1 would often ask where the p was or where the b was on the key board and when I showed her she would disagree because the round bits were closed unlike vc. Vc, while similar, isn't quite "running writing". Running writing is linked, vc is not. Our school have started teaching vc in the beginning then reverting to printing in the older age groups once they know the alphabet and basic words because it its easier.

    Sent from my magical black talky thingy using bubhub
    When I started school (in Victoria) they were teaching printing, then during that time Vic Modern Cursive was introduced - so I had to unlearn printing and learn cursive in order to progress to running writing. This was MUCH harder (IMO) than teaching a child cursive from dot (which flows readily into running writing).

    I print now and have to really focus to write in cursive (which I must to for work) because printing is what I first learnt.

    I think regardless of the font/style of writing used, translating beginning letter knowledge into using a keyboard is hard because keyboards only have CAPS but the screen then automatically types in lower case. But that's something else altogether.

  10. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    3,525
    Thanks
    1,890
    Thanked
    2,539
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by αληθη View Post
    Makes sense to me anyway after having to write a million essays in an hour.
    Wooaaaaaah that's one mean feat!!

    All of the above plus I think just because we use computers these days doesn't mean we shouldn't/don't need to learn how to write well, and cursive is all about the beauty in writing. I love it and would be quite upset if DS wasn't taught it in school.

  11. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Ellewood For This Useful Post:

    αληθη  (05-02-2013),MsTruth  (05-02-2013),Stiflers Mom  (05-02-2013)

  12. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Qld
    Posts
    26,930
    Thanks
    2,736
    Thanked
    6,743
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    I'm actually quite shocked by how many adults cannot do cursive writing. I often get comments on my handwriting, and understand that I've 'jazzed it up a bit,' to suit me, but these people comment that they can't even manage cursive at all. I just find it bizarre, as it's my go-to writing style...


 

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 20
    Last Post: 26-10-2013, 23:31
  2. Victorian Era series and movies
    By SoThisIsLove in forum Movies / Music / Books / TV Chat
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-12-2012, 20:27
  3. Queensland Handwriting Font
    By timetoplay! in forum Preschools and Schools
    Replies: 115
    Last Post: 16-05-2012, 19:09

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Riverton Leisureplex
An Extreme Family Pass at Riverton Leisureplex is the ultimate way to cool off during the summer school holidays. The $30 Pass allows pool and waterslide access for 2 adults and 2 children, as well as a drink, popcorn and an icy pole for each person.
sales & new stuffsee all
The Health Hub
Give a new mum a fitness boost for Christmas & New Year. Studio-based, small group training sessions - cardio, strength, core, Pilates & boxing. Choice of 16 hrs per week, flexible-arrival feature - bubs & kids welcome! Gift vouchers available.
featured supporter
Sarah Tooke Childbirth & Parenting Education
Providing private, personalised antenatal childbirth & parenting education to expectant parents in the comfort of their own home. Sessions are flexible, including everything that hospital based programs cover. Click to find out more!
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!