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  1. #1
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    Default Does this sound 'normal' to you?

    I just visited a friend that gave birth on the weekend. I'll start by saying she has a gorgeous, healthy DS which is all that matters in the end

    However....I was quite surprised at some of the circumstances of her labour/birth and was curious to know if this is considered 'normal'. I'll summarise in points:-

    - epi offered/accepted as soon as she arrived, without checking dialation to determine stage etc
    - at no point was dialation checked until 6hrs later when OB arrived
    - stated baby's h/rate had dropped 'a little' and suggested e/csection
    - still hadn't told her how dialated she was at this point, just 'not enough'
    - baby offered formula for first 2 nights just so mum could rest
    - baby automatically taken each night to nursery, only returned for feeds

    My friend is perfectly happy as its her first bub and had no expectations anyway. But I just found these above points odd....is it just me? I'm of course comparing to my own experience so could be entirely off track, so was just curious!

    I thought it was dangerous or detrimental to give an epi too early? I also don't believe his excuse for a c/s was adequate, considering there were no alarm bells about the h/rate before then. Then offering formula to a mum who had ample (read massive!) milk boobies with no issues b/f yet, as well as bub not rooming with mum - is all strange to me!

    My friend accepted the formula offer because she assumed it was 'standard' so mums could get rest. She has since had a midwife say they probably gave her the epi too early aswell.

    FYI - private hospital in Melb.
    Last edited by Pesca77; 16-01-2013 at 13:01.

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    Default Does this sound 'normal' to you?

    Interesting! It's like she went back in time!

    Having said that though, apart from the c-section, I would probably want all those things the next time I give birth (epidural, formula and bub in the nursery overnight). I didn't know the nursery existed til I was checking out!

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    Default Re: Does this sound 'normal' to you?

    I dont think any of its normal per se, but if she is happpy with how it went I don't see an issue. Also sounds like she didn't do much research. I had a lot of the same when I gave birth to my first child. I don't regret any of it, just informed myself for the next few births

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    That sounds pretty standard/normal for a private hospital to me sorry!!!

    It's the complete opposite at the public hospital I work at!!!

    Perhaps OB doesn't trust the midwives to check dilation properly?

    If I'd been her midwife....
    offered VE on arrival to check dilation, wouldn't have forced it if she declined. Depending how well she looked like she was coping (in control vs severely distressed I would offer pain relief or if she requested pain relief arrange for that. If she wanted an epidural (which she did) I would request to do a check just to make sure that she's not actually 10cm and we're going have a baby before the an anaesthetist gets there to do said epidural.

    I don't get to make decisions on if or when a Caesar happens. Also a drop in heartbeat could be a drop to 80bpm for 5 minutes (start making a move for theatre) or to 100bpm for a minute in which case you'd keep an eye on it.

    I wouldn't offer formula for nights, unless the mother requested and even then it's my duty of care to inform her of the effects that comp feeding overnight could have on her supply etc. The hospital I work at requires a consent form to be signed to give formula which goes down a treat at 3am, let me tell you.

    We also don't have a night nursery due to BFHI accreditation and tbh your taking that baby home in 2-4 days. Welcome to being woken through the night. If baby is really unsettled (baby that screamed for 10 hours straight on my last lot of nights of I'm looking at you) and depending on my workload ill offer to take baby for an hour or so and cuddle him whilst writing notes etc.

    however sounds like she's very happy, and all those reasons are why some people choose private because that's what they want each to their own.
    Last edited by wannawannabe; 16-01-2013 at 13:23.

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    Some of it doesn't sound 'normal' but if the mother is happy that's all that matters. My DS was taken into the nursery at night and only returned when he needed feeding the first night we were in hospital as I hadn't slept in 5 days. It was awesome!

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    Default Does this sound 'normal' to you?

    Not normal to me, I birthed at two different private hospitals and rooming in was encouraged (also what I wanted) and the midwives did everything they could to facilitate breastfeeding. Not sure about the epi?
    I would feel a little ripped off if I was in that situation but thats me. If the Mum was happy with that then that is all that matters. Each person is different and has different expectations of birth and what will happen after.

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    I was really surprised that the private hospital my friend gave birth in recently didn't have a rooming in policy either, I thought these days it was considered best practice?

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    I don't know about the birth ones, as I had a c-section. But my hospital automatically took DD to the nursery each night, and I asked for her to room in with me on the 3rd and 4th nights.

    I was happy with that, as I didn't know any different, and it meant I could get minimal rest. (I say minimal, due to being woken every 2 seconds for observations...) DD never cried, and had to be woken to feed, so they brought her to me on regular intervals for those first 2 nights.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post
    That sounds pretty standard/normal for a private hospital to me sorry!!!

    It's the complete opposite at the public hospital I work at!!!

    Perhaps OB doesn't trust the midwives to check dilation properly?

    If I'd been her midwife....
    offered VE on arrival to check dilation, wouldn't have forced it if she declined. Depending how well she looked like she was coping (in control vs severely distressed I would offer pain relief or if she requested pain relief arrange for that. If she wanted an epidural (which she did) I would request to do a check just to make sure that she's not actually 10cm and we're going have a baby before the an anaesthetist gets there to do said epidural.

    I don't get to make decisions on if or when a Caesar happens. Also a drop in heartbeat could be a drop to 80bpm for 5 minutes (start making a move for theatre) or to 100bpm for a minute in which case you'd keep an eye on it.

    I wouldn't offer formula for nights, unless the mother requested and even then it's my duty of care to inform her of the effects that comp feeding overnight could have on her supply etc. The hospital I work at requires a consent form to be signed to give formula which goes down a treat at 3am, let me tell you.

    We also don't have a night nursery due to BFHI accreditation and tbh your taking that baby home in 2-4 days. Welcome to being woken through the night. If baby is really unsettled (baby that screamed for 10 hours straight on my last lot of nights of I'm looking at you) and depending on my workload ill offer to take baby for an hour or so and cuddle him whilst writing notes etc.

    however sounds like she's very happy, and all those reasons are why some people choose private because that's what they want each to their own.
    Um I birthed private for both of mine and that is not normal practice. My experience couldn't have been more opposite.
    My midwife was very thorough checking dilation etc, explaining everything to me as she went, she liased constantly with my ob. My ob certainly wasn't quick to offer a cs even with my complications along the way, he did his best to avoid it because it was my wish not to have one. I would expect what the op described to occur in public hospitals not private and it has certainly been the case with many cases I have dealt with in risk management. Also as far as the nursery part goes, yes of course once we get home we will be waking to the baby through the night but immediately after child birth there is nothing wrong with anyone using the nursery at any time. After my first delivery which was a 33 hour long complicated delivery I was exhausted, I was still vomiting hours later due to the drugs, I couldn't get up without falling over due to my extremily low blood pressure, I needed the rest and had bub in the nursery that night. And with my second I had that many pain killers during labour that I was so drowsy I couldn't even hold my ds so again he was in the nursery that night as per the recommendation of the midwife.

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    Last edited by Cinderella82; 11-09-2013 at 14:33.

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