+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked
    0
    Reviews
    1

    Default Previous Shoulder Dystocia

    Hi

    im just looking for some info about previous shoulder dystocia and subsequent births....

    DD1 - natural birth ob shocked said I must have terrific stomach muscles as she thought bub was around 6pd, she was 8pd 2oz so not huge was told would probably not be able to have a bigger bub as she was stuck for a while during pushing.

    DD2 - 8pd 9oz born at 38.5weeks and shoulder dystocia freed with mcroberts and ob pulling her out (suspected broken collar bone - never X-rayed) was breech until 37 weeks when I had her turned via ecv (that or same day csection due to pre term labour in small country hospital)

    This time I'm only 16 weeks but have just found out we are having a boy this scares me as the smallest boy born in the last 3 generations in my family was 9pd 15oz! The last boy born was 10pd 8oz therefore I'm just wanting a heads up on any options people may have had after a previous shoulder dystocia I don't see my ob again til 7/2 so ages away!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,764
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked
    465
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default Previous Shoulder Dystocia

    I had a severe shoulder dystocia with my first baby. She was 9 pound and was bigger around the abdomen than the head. She had nerve damage in her shoulder that meant she couldn't move one of her arms. It wasn't until she was 18 months old that we were given confirmation that she wouldn't need surgery.
    I've had 2 natural births since. My second was much better, but DD2 was just over 3 kgs. My third was not much fun at all, but DS was close to 4kgs. Both subsequent pregnancies I had growth scans to check the size of baby and had early inductions.
    HTH

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    791
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked
    182
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Previous Shoulder Dystocia

    I had it with my DS in 2011 he was 9pound, I had my DD in December, the dr was worried about the size of DD as if she was too big I would have to go to another hospital but she was only 6pound 8, dr was very surprised. Your dr can only keep an eye on the size of bubs and he will probably get you to have an ultrasound towards the end. A friend of mine was told she would have to have a c-section for her next child because of it, I thought this seemed a bit full on since they had no idea of what her future bubs would be like.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    269
    Thanks
    207
    Thanked
    124
    Reviews
    2
    Hi

    I had a shoulder dystocia with my DD2. She was 9lb 15oz. (about 4.5kg). All the "experts" (the midwife who attended the birth and doctors that I saw during my 3rd pregnancy) put it down to her size. I never have and I never will.

    Her labour was completely stuffed around. I had my 16 month old DD1 present for the start of labour (she had to be removed because she was interfering with my concentration), I didn't rest because I was told second labours are much quicker than firsts -- I stayed up all night because I was expecting any minute that the pre-labour pains would turn into full-blown labour followed by a quick delivery. I had had some incompatibilities with my attending midwife and also (as strange as it might seem) my support person and I wasn't feeling very connected to them. I handed over control to the midwifes -- instead of just following my body, I expected that they would somehow direct my labour and birth. I wasn't expecting to be monitored during the labour so when they started doing that I thought something must have been wrong and that a caesar was the likely outcome (my WORST birthing nightmare!)... so I had fear happening just for good measure. There were a whole stack of distractions and things that weren't helpful to labour.... consequently, the 2nd stage didn't run smoothly. Unlike my first baby, I had to physically summon strength to push my baby out and by this stage I was completely exhausted. We got as far as her eyebrows and she wasn't coming any further. After trying a few different things, they did McRoberts and got her out.

    After her birth, I spent alot of time reflecting on my experience. I worked out EXACTLY how I wanted my next birth to be -- what I wanted and what I didn't -- and I was not prepared to be flexible on any of it.

    Right from the start of my third pregnancy the doctors/midwives were at me about shoulder dystocia. "Bigger chance of it happening again". "Subsequent babies are bigger." Etc, etc. Bub started measuring "large for dates" from about 26 weeks so then there was even more pressure. All the information I read, completely blew any arguments the medical people could come up with out of the water. There is no conclusive evidence that the risk factors associated with shoulder dystocia increase one's chances of another shoulder dystocia. There are also no studies which take into account the mother's psychological state during labour to prove or disprove that as a contributing factor.

    Fast forward to my son's birth -- he was 11 pounds and I birthed him as easily as I birthed my first daughter who was a tiddler at 7lb 3 oz. This proved to me that our belief that it was our daughter's labour -- not her size -- which caused her to get stuck was justified.

    My DD3 was 9lb 5oz and she didn't get stuck either. No one mentioned shoulder dystocia throughout my 4th pregnancy, which I find amusing because I was told that it was mandatory for every medical professional I came across to make sure I aware of the risks of recurrent shoulder dystocia. I also find it amusing that when I did speak to medical professionals about shoulder dystocia after the birth of my son, they would comment that it was probably my daughter's position that was the problem then, rather than her size. Just flip-flop to suit the situation! Don't be adamant throughout an entire pregnancy that it was my daughter's size that was the problem and then when I birth another significantly larger baby with no problem, switch your argument to her position, and expect me to respect your opinion.

    So, sorry for my little rant. How the medical profession treats expectant mothers is a real sore point for me.

    My point in all that is this: just because you've had one shoulder dystocia, doesn't mean you need to expect another one. Read up about it, prepare yourself physically and mentally, reflect on your past births and identify any things that may have affected the outcome and change/eliminate them for your up and coming birth and don't blindly accept what the doctors tell you!!

    I hope that some of that is helpful to your situation and I wish you a safe and fulfilling birth.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    18
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked
    0
    Reviews
    1
    Thanks for your replies I will mention to my ob my concerns and see what they think great to hear others positive experiences after one shoulder dystocia

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    629
    Thanks
    249
    Thanked
    222
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I experienced shoulder dystocia with my son who was 8 pounds 13 ounces. When I was pregnant with DD2 I was told conflicting information for different ob's and midwifes (public patient). One told me that I was to have a growth scan at 28 weeks and then we would go from there (I had the scan and they reckoned she was exactly spot on size for dates), another ob told me it simply wouldn't happen again because he had a feeling (also told me she would be born on Christmas Day), and the midwives just never seemed to concerned. I never wanted a c-section because of it as I am scared of them lol, same thing for being induced early, in the end I read a lot my self and decided that I just wanted the staff on when I was in labour to be aware of the possibility and confident in their ability to perform the maneuvers if needed. Also I was going to try and stay upright during second stage because although I was active and upright for DS's birth I ended up laying back on the bed right at the end when I was already 10cms and got tired of waiting.
    The whole thing ended up being a non-issue when DD2 was born at 36+1 (not induced it was just when she wanted to come) weighing 6 pounds 15 ounces, 2 and half hour labour with no troubles at all.
    This time I have only just seen the ob yesterday and she only commented on DS size and SD quickly in passing.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    618
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    98
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I experienced this with my first .... 7lb13 ....he was posterior and got stuck but wasn't a big deal in the end.

    I am now recovering very poorly from the birth of my second son 3.5weeks ago. He ended up being 9lb13 and I expressed my concerns about his wide shoulders and requested an early induction. Ended up being induced just 4 days before my due date. He ended up posterior during labour but then turned transverse and there was no time for a c section. He was pulled out with forceps....cord tight around his neck then my fears came true and his shoulders got stuck, he pulled his head back in...not good when cord around neck... And had to be pulled out again. It all resulted in a broken collar bone and 5 broken ribs from resuscitation. Not to mention the damage done to myself. I am very traumatized by his birth and don't want to scare others but in hindsight I shouldn't have played the natural birth hero and should have opted for a c section. It's my biggest regret now. I really should not have gone through that. And I knew all along he was big with big shoulders.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    28,229
    Thanks
    1,515
    Thanked
    992
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    I had shoulder dystocia with my 3rd and 4th and 5th were born fine.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,764
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked
    465
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default Previous Shoulder Dystocia

    Quote Originally Posted by heymegz View Post
    I experienced this with my first .... 7lb13 ....he was posterior and got stuck but wasn't a big deal in the end.

    I am now recovering very poorly from the birth of my second son 3.5weeks ago. He ended up being 9lb13 and I expressed my concerns about his wide shoulders and requested an early induction. Ended up being induced just 4 days before my due date. He ended up posterior during labour but then turned transverse and there was no time for a c section. He was pulled out with forceps....cord tight around his neck then my fears came true and his shoulders got stuck, he pulled his head back in...not good when cord around neck... And had to be pulled out again. It all resulted in a broken collar bone and 5 broken ribs from resuscitation. Not to mention the damage done to myself. I am very traumatized by his birth and don't want to scare others but in hindsight I shouldn't have played the natural birth hero and should have opted for a c section. It's my biggest regret now. I really should not have gone through that. And I knew all along he was big with big shoulders.
    I'm so sorry to read about your DS2's birth. Please don't feel guilty- we all make the best decisions we can based on all the information we have at the time. I hope your DS is doing well and you find some healing and peace yourself. Big hugs.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    4,767
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked
    11
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Shoulder dystocia is more often a positional issue (either the baby's position, or the mother's pushing position, or a combination of both) rather than an issue of the baby's size alone.

    Talk to mothers who have experienced this and you'll find that many were semi reclined while pushing - semi reclined during second stage reduces the size of the pelvic outlet - it kind of collapses in on itself. The baby is also trying to come out "uphill" because it's coming through a "J" shaped curve, up and under the pubic bone - rather than the straight ahead exit we tend to have in our minds eye. In other cases, the mum might be aware (or caregivers were aware) that baby was in a funky presentation on the way down.

    The facts are that 7lb babies can and do cause shoulder dystocia, and 10lb babies can be born normally without assistance (and I've seen both). It's not about size, and this is borne out by repeated studies that have shown induction for macrosomia (big baby) has no impact on rates of shoulder dystocia. Also bearing in mind that "big" babies aren't necessarily bigger boned - they can simply be carrying more body fat (which is squishy and pliable and unlikely to cause them to get "stuck"), or they can be longer in length and therefore heavier, while actually being quite slim.

    When you look at what's happening physiologically as a baby navigates the pelvis it becomes really clear that this is generally a positional issue.
    Last edited by ~Emmylou~; 22-01-2013 at 22:27.


 

Similar Threads

  1. MRI Needed for shoulder work injury
    By glitter girl in forum First Trimester Chat
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-11-2012, 09:02
  2. Shouorder dystocia!! wtf!!!
    By spitthedummy in forum Pregnancy & Birth General Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-03-2012, 12:14
  3. Births after a previous shoulder dystocia delivery
    By MyLittleLilacTree in forum Birth Trauma Support
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 15-02-2012, 12:53

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Riverton Leisureplex
An Extreme Family Pass at Riverton Leisureplex is the ultimate way to cool off during the summer school holidays. The $30 Pass allows pool and waterslide access for 2 adults and 2 children, as well as a drink, popcorn and an icy pole for each person.
sales & new stuffsee all
Bub Hub Sales Listing
HAVING A SALE? Let parents know about it with a Bub Hub Sales listing. Listings are featured on our well trafficked Sales Page + selected randomly to appear on EVERY page
featured supporter
Einsteinz Music
Fun & interactive music classes!
Classes are taught by professional musicians! Children are taught the fundamentals of music: beat, pitch, rhythm and tempo through hands-on experience. Click for more details!!!
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!