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  1. #11
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    heeeeerekittykitty is offline My babies, my cats ....ahhhh , bliss !!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owl79 View Post
    I completely relate to this. I think if J had been my second child I would have known a lot earlier.
    I completely agree. I had nothing to compare to and really thought my son was fine . It didn't help that even the doctors were quite in two minds about my son as he was doing many things not consistent with ASD but was also displaying many symptoms that WERE consistent with a child being on the spectrum . Anyway after all that uncertainty he had quite a significant period of regression , losing words he has been saying , skills and so forth . That's when there was no doubt in any of our minds :-(

  2. #12
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    Good news day for me J has been fully toilet trained for wees for about a year and dry at night for nearly 6 months but every single poo would go in his pants. The most annoying thing was that he knew when he was doing it because he would go and hide in a corner. However, three times in the last 2 days he has sat on the potty all by himself (no prompting from us) and each time he has done a poo! We've also had two accidents but it's certainly a big step forward.
    I hope every one is having a good day with your family!

  3. #13
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    That's wonderful ! Big hi five to your little man xxxx I had managed to toilet train Finn but the last week he has pooped and peed in his pants!! In just hopeing he goes back to the toilet.

    I find that with Finn it's 3 steps forward two steps back , he progresses rapidly and then has a few terrible weeks where I feel like ' oh my god I really do have a child with autism ' and I think about it and get down and then he will suddenly do something I thought he couldn't do or say something I've never thought he knew and I'm jumping up and down with excitement .

    So glad your boy has managed the poop in potty ! One more step to be independant I say !

    Hope you all have a lovely weekend too !!!

  4. #14
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    heeeeerekittykitty is offline My babies, my cats ....ahhhh , bliss !!!
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    Wow owl79 that's incredible !! So happy for you and your little boy .

    I will be overjoyed if my son is ever toilet trained . We have not yet tried , he's OT said we will work on it together once he's showing signs of readiness and I really pray its a skill he can eventually master .

    Awesome day you've had :-)


    Today's been a really good day for us , nothing special has happened but my son has just been very happy and playing , we were out and about all day and there were no dramas , just a good day overall . One of those days that you can almost forget (and I stress * almost * ) that your son has autism .

    Hope everyone's well xxoo

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    Quote Originally Posted by heeeeerekittykitty View Post

    I have a daughter who's 2 in April . She seems nuero typical at this stage but I am concerned she has only a handful of words . I guess time will tell :-( she is however so very different to how my son ever was , I now see how clear it was that he had autism .
    I also can relate to this. I definitely would have seen the signs earlier for DS if he wasn’t my firstborn. I felt that something was wrong at around 2. He wasn’t talking yet (just started when he turned 2), only saying a handful of words before then.

    In hindsight, things I didn’t realize were red flags at the time are glaringly obvious now! He was very clingy, would not engage with other family members much ( would hide from grandparents, etc) would line his cars up ALL the time, didn’t interact a lot with us – played a lot on his own with the same toys, no pretend type play, cried when he heard certain sounds, just to name a few things.

    Then I had DD and the signs became more obvious. DS had started with toilet training just fine at 2 and was weeing and pooing in the potty. Suddenly, he wanted to poo in his nappies again (this continued till he was almost 5) His behaviour also started to get more challenging. The tantrums were like nothing I had ever witnessed and it seemed impossible to discipline him – it literally felt like things would go in one ear and out the other. I initially put it down to him not coping with having a new baby around and being in the terrible two’s.

    Also, I didn’t have anything to compare this to, being a first time mum. All his cousins were girls, we didn’t go to play group or crèche and nobody in the family thought any thing was amiss. My own niggling doubts started to set in and I couldn’t ignore them. I told my DP that something was wrong and he got angry at me and told me I wanted something to be wrong, and was looking for things. The rest of the family dismissed it as him being a late bloomer, just shy, sensitive, needs more discipline, they told me that boys are different to girls and do things later, and so on. Basically, I had no support from anybody and was led to believe that I was over-reacting. I’d never felt more alone and in despair.

    It was thanks to another mum at DS’s kinder who has a DS with Aspergers and told me to listen to my gut that led to our dx. If only I took him to the paed sooner……

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    heeeeerekittykitty  (13-01-2013)

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    Owl79 Big congratulations to your DS for using the potty!! That is such a big thing! I know how excited I was when my DS finally stopped pooing in his nappy. He was 4 (about 4.5 or almost 5) and it took a lot of patience and perseverance. We had to praise him HEAPS for ages and ages but it was wonderful not to have to change big pooey, smelly nappies anymore. So good for you and your DS!
    Last edited by ILOVEBRODY; 13-01-2013 at 15:51. Reason: details left out

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    Quote Originally Posted by heeeeerekittykitty View Post
    Today's been a really good day for us , nothing special has happened but my son has just been very happy and playing , we were out and about all day and there were no dramas , just a good day overall . One of those days that you can almost forget (and I stress * almost * ) that your son has autism .

    How wonderful that you’ve had a great day! It’s the good days that get us through the more challenging ones, I think. I hold onto the really good days and savour them! Other people must think I’m crazy when I rave on about my DS getting motivated to dress himself in the morning or come out of kinder at the end of the session and not run off down the road but wait for me to hold his hand to cross the road. To me it’s a win, and it always puts me in good spirits

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    [QUOTE=babynomad;6999936] Then in Sunday we went to a playground . A girl of about 6 was there and DS is super friendly, and followed her around . She and her brother began teasing DS saying he speaks funny and to leave them alone . He didn't get it. The little girl was shouting ' go away I'm getting really fed up with you '
    Anyway we left . The little girl was just a little girl but our heart sank for our son . He just wanted to play and it made me come back down to earth with a thump.

    Babynomad- (Sam Hello again! Just like to say a BIG thankyou for being a friend to me on Bubhub, and for starting this thread. I have to say, I just cried right now, about your post I have just quoted on.

    As you may remember, my DS is 2 (3 next month). About 3 months ago, while in a hospital waiting room, DS was playing with play equipment mounted on the wall. It had several silver balls you had to push up through the maze, to watch them come racing down again. Needless to say, DS loved it! He saw it, and no one else was there so he wanted to play. No sooner had he got there, two kids, about 4 and 3 year olds came racing over and pushed him aside and wouldn't let him play. The mother was watching, but said nothing. I gently said to the girl (4 or so) that "everyone can play, lets share" I let DS play with one ball, and let the other two kids have the other 5 between them, so no one could say I was being unfair. When they kept turning their backs on DS so he couldn't get in, (I couldn't physically move them!!) I led him away until they got bored with it. They did, and we went back. As soon as we did, they came racing back and same thing happened.
    We repeated this another 2 times. As soon as DS left, they got bored and wondered off. They only wanted it so DS couldn't have it. On our last attempt (we were there for 2 hours in a crowded waiting room with an autistic child, you could imagine, he needed to play) when I took him back, sure enough the kids came racing back. DS, who had been holding it together till then, just started crying. He ran off a little and cried and cried and looked at me why I wouldn't help him. With that the little girl, with hands on hips, shouted "go away, your just a sooky sooky la la!" then again. "sooky sooky la la!!!!" I saw red. I shot the girl the most stern look I could muster, and under a shakey and angry voice, I looked her right in the eye and said " he's just a little boy, and he has a disability, YOU leave HIM ALONE!" I was so angry. I didn't know if I did the right thing stating his "disability", but I was so angry, and I wanted the mother to hear, and I didn't want her thinking DS was a spoilt brat and a sook, I wanted her to know he couldn't help getting upset, and I wanted her to know she needs to beware of the "invisible disability", she needs to know that she can't just assume there is no disability. More people need to be more aware of autism. But it felt good to stick up for my boy. Perhaps any of you may think I went to far, but at the time it didn't feel like it, and I'm still happy I said something.

    On another note Sam, I am having a consult on wednesday with Jo, anthing I should be prepared for, or need to ask?
    Last edited by mysweetboy; 13-01-2013 at 20:46.

  11. #19
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    Hi there my sweet boy! Jo is very easy to talk to and will tell you all about it . She is very natural and friendly but also tells you how she sees it . I trust her 100% truly with guiding us . The proof is there with my son . You will worry whilst your doing the learning that your not doing much with your son but try not to. You have got to learn this stuff and really it becomes so obvious in the end. As i said we are just at the beginning too but it's been a bigger improvement than we could of hoped.

    As for you and the kids and your son , you did the right thing . They can't stick up for themselves. I just wonder why the parents of these children don't step in. In our case my son was being teased and the little girl was being a brat really . If my other son who is neuro typical was acting like that I would say " hey Mr we do not treat others like that , everyone is allowed to play and you speak nicely too" .

    It's hard to know when to mention autism isn't it. I realise now that Finn understands me... He just decides if he can respond or wants to or sometimes he hasn't heard me as he is off somewhere in his mind<img src="images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" smilieid="1" class="inlineimg" but i don't want to say in front of his about his autism. I don't want him feeling like he is odd , but at the same time there are moments I just want to say it to explain why he is doing something to people.

    Today we went to a wildlife park. There was a feeding area for kangaroos . Finn was ok for a while then he went nuts , he was chasing kangaroos. , pulling there tails and stomping on their tails. My husband and i were shouting no to him but it did not get through he was out of control with excitement and all the other people were looking at him like he was a monster child . We couldn't get him. I wanted to scream. <img src="images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" smilieid="1" class="inlineimg" finally I shouted &quot; marshmallow &quot; an he ran over ..... Ha ha ha I told him off loudly more for the benefit of the disgusted animal lovers than him, he already had a mouth full of marshmallow and was not listening ! It's tough . I will laugh about that one day I'm sure.

    Good luck with Jo , she is lovely but also direct and she has to be to help us. I always feel 100% better after talking to her . I feel I can deal with this and I feel positive. Just remember its a long term therapy that takes a while to understand and begin but it really makes sense and eventually will save you money as your the main therapist . <img src="images/smilies/smile.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" smilieid="1" class="inlineimg" good luck . Also you may choose not to do it but we can all still share tips from our various therapies out kids are doing xxx

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    It's a bit hard replying using your phone, but as I sit here waiting in my car, I have been reading other posts you have all posted. I just want to say a big "Woo hoo!" For those on the toilet training journey. I attempted awhile ago with DS, and we managed 2 poos on the toilet ( only because I knew he was busting and I sat him on the loo and read him a book!)It was by chance really, he doesn't know what it's about. And he can't talk, I can't tell him to let me know when he's about to do poo. I doubt he knows himself. If I can get him toilet trained before he starts school, I'd be over the moon!Sam- Thanks so much for telling me your story, and helping me to get in touch with Jo. I am looking forward to it. I'm optimistic, but also a little anxious. Don't know where that has come from. Kitty- Yoo-hoo! Me again! Did you get my PM? Message me when ever you want, or you can get in touch with me here if you want. Somedays, even the smallest thing can make me beam from ear to ear with pride, with how well DS is doing, and some of his achievements, how ever small they are. Parents on NT kids just don't get it. Just recently, I was watching him playing with his wooden double decker car park complex he got for Christmas. He was driving his cars appropriately up the ramp and parking them. Just like any other kid. I was so proud!I love my son so much. Words can't discribe. He makes my heart melt, but there are days, where I hate autism. Sometimes he's a "normal" kid with some slight differences, and there are days were I feel we can never fit in to normal society. My friends DS if 5 months younger than mine, and at 18 months, he had over 150 words, and could tell the difference between different types of parsley in his mums garden. He knew what were weeds and what were vegetable plants. I used to find it hard to relish in my friend joy when her boy did something amazing, and my boy just sat and watched the ceiling fan ho round and round.


 

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