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  1. #31
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    I wish I wasn't so afraid of labour the first time, that's my only regret.
    The experience was amazing, no one told me it would be, all I heard was how painful it was, or how horrible it is. It put alot of doubt in my mind that I was not capable of giving birth.
    2nd time I relaxed and it was even better, shorter, still painful but my mind handled it better and I recovered quicker because of it.

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    subscribing!!

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    Default Labour and Birth - What you wish you had known then?

    Great thread! Subbing.

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    Default Re: Labour and Birth - What you wish you had known then?

    I wish I had known that I would be hypersensitive to the gel when I was induced.

    I wish someone had told me about the bloody show/plug so I didn't think there was something wrong when it came out in the toilet.

    I wish someone had told me it would feel like I needed to poo.

    Mostly I wish they would have let DP stay so that I didn't have to labour alone until the last half hr.

    Also it would have been nice for someone to tell me I was allowed to walk around the hospital after the birth with my baby instead of me sitting in my room just waiting for visitors.

    Sent from my GT-I9300T using BubHub

  5. #35
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    Great info, thanks all!!

    Bumping for anyone else who wants to contribute

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pru40 View Post
    Great thread idea.

    I'd love to hear from those who have had an elective Caesarean section and regretted it... or not.

    Also, what's labour and birth like after a long gap between kids. And what's it like when you're over 40. Anything different to anticipate?

    I'm 30 weeks pregnant and planning on an elective C-section in a private hospital. I'm thinking less risk to baby, no pain and avoiding anxiety about my lack of fitness. My obstetrician suggests an induction at 38 weeks. But like the previous poster I recall a very painful birth of my son with the Syntocinon drip (15 years ago now but that memory is burned in).

    I've been watching "One born every minute" on SBS as mental preparation.

    My earlier experiences of labour and birth taught me that a birth plan can be largely irrelevant on the day and the only things I really needed from the carefully packed bags & supplies I took to hospital were hair ties, socks and lemonade ice blocks. I was only upset by things I hadn't expected or knew nothing of. I also found out that I had a strong instinct to be alone and not be touched while labouring - hadn't realised that was an option or a 'normal' feeling.

    First of all- I wouldn't recommend a c/s just because you think no pain. The recovery is hideous. They cut through all you muscle layers in your tummy and it is NOT an easy recovery at all. Think long and hard about if you are willing to deal with that with a newborn.

    Lack of fitness is not something I would be too worried about either. All types of women of all different body shapes and fitness levels from all around the world give birth every day. It's a natural thing to do and (I've heard, as I had a c/s) very instinctual. And it's not always less risk to baby either.

    However, having said that, I did have a very positive elective c/s. Of course you're bed-ridden for the first 24 hours after the birth, and it can affect how quickly your breast milk comes in (definitely a factor if you would like to breastfeed) but if you align yourself with good support people, you should be fine.

    My tips:

    All midwives will have different strategies on learning how to breastfeed your baby. Some are gentle and work with you, but there are also some out there who will tell you there is only one way how to do it, and they will push you to do is their way. Tell them to bugger off and request someone else.

    Pack snacks for you to have at the hospital AFTER the birth! My hospital serves 3 meals and 2 snacks a day- but I was HUNGRY! I had muesli bars, fruit cups etc and it was so handy having that stuff around to snack on if I felt like it.

    'They' will tell you it's hospital policy for husbands and partners to not be able to stay the night with you. For me, this was depressing and as soon as DP left for the evening, the boys would start tag-team crying all night long and it was stressful. I would be in tears all night. AFAIK, some people on here have just insisted that their partner stay. If you can get away with it, and you want it to happen, push for it to happen. (Especially if you are in a private room... I was because I had twins so there was really no reason DP had to leave. Seriously, it's not like we were going to get up to mischief- I had just had a c/s for crying out loud!)

    Start thinking now about life beyond labour. You will have a tiny baby at home. When I was pg first time round, I was focused on the pregnancy and labour, and then having a cute (but 'good') baby at home. I was highly unprepared from bf problems, ESPECIALLY sleep issues, and just the general isolation that comes with being a first time mother. Think about how you will cope, what you will use to cope, what aides are available to you etc. Who will you ask for advice? I remember calling my Mother sobbing one night in late Oct when the boys were a couple of weeks old- I was distraught because I didn't know what to dress them in for bed! It was our first warm night and I was a mess. Of course, the problem was much bigger- I wasn't sleeping and I was completely overwhelmed, but my Mum dropped everything to help me whenever I needed it. Do you have someone in your life like that?

    And lastly, enjoy these moments. You may find them hard to remember in a few weeks, months, years. I can barely remember much from my previous 'labour'... because I was always waiting for the next thing to happen. Just be in the moment, be aware of what is happening around you, and remember that you are doing a very special and unique thing- you are giving life to another human being. How special! Don't rush it away.. savour it! Because before you know it, they'll be one. And then four. And then I'm sure I'll be waving my boys off to uni or whatever path they choose and the hazy days leading up to their birth etc will be all but forgotten.. and that will be a huge shame.

  7. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Mod-Nomsie For This Useful Post:

    Albert01  (12-02-2013),Jessie02  (20-10-2013),Ladybug09  (20-03-2013),maybee baybee  (12-02-2013),MonsterMummy  (11-02-2013),Pru40  (06-01-2013),witherwings  (21-03-2013)

  8. #37
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    Default Labour and Birth - What you wish you had known then?

    I've had 3 vaginal births and 2 c-sections. PLEASE do not choose c section, it is permanent damage to your body that's disgusting to recover from. Have an epidural if you are worried about labour pain.

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Chew the Mintie For This Useful Post:

    missie_mackxxxx  (20-03-2013),Pru40  (06-01-2013)

  10. #38
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    Default Labour and Birth - What you wish you had known then?

    C sections are not less risk to baby, they are more likely to have breathing difficulties, respiratory infections in first year of life, diffculties breastfeeding, more likely to die from SIDS (if there is no labour at all, even some labour helps). A study even found that babies conceived after c section are twice as likely to be still born, maybe due to reduced placental function.

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    Pru40  (06-01-2013)

  12. #39
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    Default Labour and Birth - What you wish you had known then?

    Quote Originally Posted by pippi View Post
    I wish I had known to say as soon as that drip goes in il have an epidural as well thanks! Nothing could have prepared me for the hell that are the contractions on the drip when being induced.
    Agree with this. Being induced was excruciating when I had ds1.

    One thing I'm glad I did was speak up against my midwife with ds2. I picked up that DS's heart rate was dropping during every contraction, the first time I mentioned it she said it was normal. Then when her supervisor came whilst she was out, I mentioned that his heartbeat was down to 30 during every contraction. She called the attending OB who said to get him out ASAP, and lucky that I was ready to push. 3 big pushes and he was out but with the cord around his neck.

    Thank God I spoke up or who knows what would have happened.

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    Default Labour and Birth - What you wish you had known then?

    Believe in yourself. I do not cope with pain well and my husband didn't think I would get through labour without drugs so I too doubted myself. In the end I had a very quick, intense back pain labour which I got through without needing pethedine or epi and was so proud of myself.

    I did use sterile water injections which were amazing! I highly recommend them.

    Trust your instincts. The midwife on the phone tried to convince me to take panadeine and go to bed and get some sleep until real labour started as I had only been having contractions for 3.5 hours and they were not going for as long as they "should". Thankfully I did not listen and went to the hospital otherwise I would have ended up delivering my baby at home. My whole labour was only 8 hours!

    Plan for after you take your baby home. I didn't really think about what it would be like. Just thought oh I will be right he will just do what he is meant to do. Ahhhh no. It was a huge adjustment. I hadn't slept in days as couldn't sleep at the hospital. I didn't know what DS wanted most of the time. I was in a fair bit of pain and hadn't prepared for it. You do get through it but I wish I was more prepared for the after.

    Oh and the after pains are the worst! Prepare a heat pack for your stomach before breastfeeding otherwise if the feeding makes them really intense like mine did you will spend the entire feed wanting to hunch over in pain.

    Ask for ibuprofen if you want it while in hospital. I had quite severe tearing and a lot of stitches and they kept just giving me Panadol because I made the mistake of just asking for pain relief and not being specific. Panadol does not help with the swelling. Ibuprofen was soooooo much better at relieving the pain.


 

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