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  1. #21
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    Yep there are potential negative effects of c-section to read up on; including not receiving the benefit of mum's vaginal flora to help build a healthy gut, and there are higher incidences of respiratory problems in c-sec babies. Lots of progressive info out there if you have a google.
    Also, if you are only 32 weeks, how can your doctor be sure the cord will still be around bub's neck in approx 2 months time? Will you have further scans to confirm it?
    Probably good to talk to an Ob as pps have suggested - a general practitioner really does not get much training whatsoever in pregnancy or birth.
    Good luck, OP.

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    Default Cord around baby neck

    Borntobe, on the contrary, shared care gp's have done extra training in obs. That plus the training in obs that we do get in med school, equals probably similar ob knowledge to a midwife.

    However, I do agree that the op should wait and see what the ob at the hospital says. Two of my kids were born with cords around the neck and they were delivered naturally with no issues.

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    Read the GP bit/missed the shared care bit. Thanks for clarifying.

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    Default Cord around baby neck

    I guess the thing is, that the vast majority of us don't get a scan after 20 weeks. So we would have no idea if the cord was around the neck until it was born. I think that if it was actually a big risk for natural delivery they would be getting all of us to have late scans to check. Do you know what I mean?

  5. #25
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Sorry I didn't realize this was an IVF thread my apologies. I've re-found this site today thanks to helpful friend which is about Nuchal Cords. This part is particularly interesting as it explains how it is not usually an issue unless you have a particularly short cord..

    "During labour a nuchal cord does not cause a problem. The baby is not ‘held up’ by the cord because the whole package – fundus (top of the uterus), placenta and cord are all moving down together. The uterus ‘shrinks’ down (contracts) moving the baby downwards, along with their attached placenta and cord. It is not until the baby’s head moves into the vagina that a few extra centimetres of additional length are required (see ‘birth’ below). However, when a c-section is done for ‘fetal distress’ or ‘lack of progress’ during labour, the presence of a nuchal cord is often used as the reason… “ah ha, look – your baby was stressed because the cord was around his neck” or “…the cord was stopping her from moving down”. The cord is unlikely to have had anything to do with the stress or lack of progress. Most likely other interventions carried out during labour led to the end scenario (eg. the use of syntocinon and/or ‘failure to wait’)."

    http://midwifethinking.com/2010/07/29/nuchal-cords/

    Here is also a link to the mother friendly organisations cesarean fact sheet which lists the risks of a cesarean. http://www.motherfriendly.org/Resour...bruary2010.pdf
    Last edited by headoverfeet; 14-12-2012 at 18:15.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by ciaomamma View Post
    Seriously... Csection is not the end of the world, if that's what you want/have been told to do then you'll be just fine! Sure recovery is a little longer and you'll have the scar but I had a csection and we were fine, breastfeeding without issues baby is healthy and well rounded.
    A cesarean section is major abdominal surgery. Yes it is an increasingly common occurance but beyond 10-15% it does nothing to improve maternal and fetal outcomes. Our currant rate is around 32% a previous poster mentioned a few risks of a cesarean and you can read more risks in the link I posted above. I totally agree each woman should be able to choose for herself which way to go but it is important to make an informed choice.

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    Default Cord around baby neck

    ...
    Last edited by MummaOJ; 14-12-2012 at 18:44.


 

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