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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by αληθη View Post
    In my experience its not easy to go through the interview stage, find someone who could do the job only to find they're unreliable, fire them and then have to go through the whole process again. It's not practical so it does lead to certain questions in the interviews.
    We've hired many mothers, many people who do party on the weekend but they still come to work on time and not hungover, we have a lot of smokers who have agreed to our rules and we have many other types of people and even a single father. Asking these questions does not mean we won't hire them it's just making sure they are right for what our business needs.
    So why on earth ask the question then? I'm sorry I really do not understand. You ask an illegal question, and then say that you might hire them anyway?

  2. #52
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    1st job fact: Did you know that asking for particular information, such as marital status or childcare responsibilities or religion, during an interview is illegal?

    There are two types of discrimination – direct and indirect.

    Direct discrimination is treating someone unequally (or unfairly) simply because they belong to a particular group or category of people. For example, you answer a job advertisement for a receptionist. You’re told over the phone that because you’re a man, you’d be wasting your time.

    Indirect discrimination results when a requirement, rule, policy, practice or procedure which appears to treat everyone the same is applied, and it has an unfair effect on particular individuals or groups of people. For example, a job advertisement says that all applicants must have ten years experience in the field. (A young person could be well qualified but is ineligible for the job.)
    More information at http://www.worksite.actu.org.au/your...ur-rights.aspx

    I think that sets the issue. What the interviewer has done is illegal. So is what some PP are doing. There are not 2 ways around it. ILLEGAL.
    You can fight for the law to be changed but what you are doing right now is as illegal as driving at 160kph on the highway.
    Last edited by ExcuseMyFrench; 13-12-2012 at 11:08.

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  4. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chew the Mintie View Post
    As a small business no I can't take someone on and spend weeks training them unless I feel sure they will stay.
    But you wouldn't be sure with ANYBODY! That's the point!

    They could just be an unreliable person because...it's who they are.

    Maybe a better question would be "Are you ever running late?" Because, in my experience, people who are ALWAYS late for things do tend to be unreliable, flaky, unable to organise themselves and be quite self involved. These can be people WITH or WITHOUT children - it doesnt' really matter.

    I once worked with a chick who was always late for work because...."Lots of people had to use the shower all at once so I had to wait my turn" WTF??? And here was another collegue with 3 children she had to get organised and choofed off to daycare and school who was always on time - always!

  5. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by shelle65 View Post
    So why on earth ask the question then? I'm sorry I really do not understand. You ask an illegal question, and then say that you might hire them anyway?
    It's not illegal to make sure I can have reliable, responsible employees. I'm not discriminating them by asking whether they have reliable child care, or a reliable plan for childcare, exactly the same as if they had reliable transport. If I decided they weren't right for my job it wouldn't be solely on no childcare it would be because they haven't displayed in the interview that they were responsible and there could be many reasons. If I really wanted an employee and they had no plans yet I would offer my knowledge in ways to organise something and give them a trial if I could, and if they messed that up then the childcare is not the fault, it's them.

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    Default Dud interview

    Quote Originally Posted by Ana Gram View Post
    I think part of the problem is that in order to pay for childcare (if you don't have anyone else), you need a job. In order to get a job, you need childcare.
    This is the problem exactly! You can get quotes and make enquiries but unless you've paid the holding deposit those childcare places can be filled by anyone off the street.

    It's a catch 22 - you can't get a job without childcare but you can't AFFORD childcare without a job!!!!

    And people say it's soooooo easy for mums to get back in to the workforce

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    Quote Originally Posted by αληθη View Post
    It's not illegal to make sure I can have reliable, responsible employees. I'm not discriminating them by asking whether they have reliable child care, or a reliable plan for childcare, exactly the same as if they had reliable transport.
    It IS illegal. Because you say it is legal does not make it true. You have the law against you in that matter, no grey area.

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  9. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by HugsBunny View Post
    This is the problem exactly! You can get quotes and make enquiries but unless you've paid the holding deposit those childcare places can be filled by anyone off the street.

    It's a catch 22 - you can't get a job without childcare but you can't AFFORD childcare without a job!!!!

    And people say it's soooooo easy for mums to get back in to the workforce
    In my business, and several others I know of (though sure this may not be the case for all) it's that they know what options they have and that they have planned. I mean, 'oh yeah my in laws/parents said they could' isn't as solid as 'I have looked into several centers and if I get this job, it will be a top priority of mine to get my child into one.'

    When I interview, I look for responsibility and childcare plans are part of that. It's not the whole issue like this whole thread makes it seem like, it is a very tiny part of the interview. One question and answer and it can tell so much about the person.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lili81 View Post
    It IS illegal. Because you say it is legal does not make it true. You have the law against you in that matter, no grey area.
    Correct. IT IS ILLEGAL! How many times do we have to say it?

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  12. #59
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    Default Dud interview

    Quote Originally Posted by αληθη View Post
    It's not illegal to make sure I can have reliable, responsible employees. I'm not discriminating them by asking whether they have reliable child care, or a reliable plan for childcare, exactly the same as if they had reliable transport. If I decided they weren't right for my job it wouldn't be solely on no childcare it would be because they haven't displayed in the interview that they were responsible and there could be many reasons. If I really wanted an employee and they had no plans yet I would offer my knowledge in ways to organise something and give them a trial if I could, and if they messed that up then the childcare is not the fault, it's them.
    Then why ask the question at all???? You've just stated that if they're right for the job you'll offer suggestions for finding child care so by that rationale, whether they have care arrangements or not has no bearing whatsoever on your decision to hire them so WHY ASK THE QUESTION???

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    You can't prove that OP didn't get the job because of her childcare arrangements or because she's a parent but surely the fact that the question was asked should be enough?

    If it's illegal to discriminate then wouldn't be illegal to ask the question? An employer can't say that they're not going to use the information discriminately....but my question then is "Why ask"?

    It might seem perfectly reasonable to ask these questions if you are a business owner, but at the end of the day it is illegal to discrimate. So one might have a business to run and that's why they're asking....but if they keep asking they won't have a business to run. Catch 22

    I think maybe some rewording of some questions may be appropriate. Asking if there are any reasons why the potential employee feels that they won't be a reliable candidate or if there is anything that can cause the employee to not be reliable would be a better way of getting the information one seeks without asking an illegal question.

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