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  1. #31
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    Default Limiting sale of alcohol?

    Quote Originally Posted by kalgirl View Post
    It's a standard procedure in the towns and communities where I've lived for the past 20 years. Here we call it a 'liquor accord'; police and elders and other community groups (police, DCP) have deemed it an absolute necessity for social order. Not only can you just buy cask wine for 2 hours a day (and the line can be 50 people plus long) but when a funeral is being held all sales of take away alcohol is prohibited before and for the duration. No take away for a week sometimes.

    In these places cask wine is the cheapest and best bang for your buck, there's no huge selection of bottled wine (maybe a dozen reds and whites all starting at $20) and the price of spirits is prohibitively expensive.

    If you don't like it you can always go for a quick drive across the border to Alice, a mere 1600km away.
    Yep this. We also used to have to give our name, ID, and tell them who we were buying it for and where we were taking it.

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    Default Limiting sale of alcohol?

    It seems pointless- but their might be a good reason for it (some research somewhere who knows). My luck would be to need a cask on a rare morning shopping trip lol. I use it for cooking but don't need to buy it often and tend to shop in the late arvo so mehhh..

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    People who say they don't care because they don't drink cask wine should be concerned, because one day big brother will be telling you that you cannot partake of, or participate in, something that you enjoy.

    We as a society are becoming numb to the gradual erosion of our ability to make decisions for ourselves.

    Furthermore, this move, which has been seen in many country towns, is for political reasons only. It does not make any difference to the consumption of alcohol or disruptive behaviour, but it gives the appearance of 'doing something'.

    It also smacks of racism as this rule mostly appears in towns/suburbs with high Aboriginal populations.

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  6. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by kalgirl View Post
    It's a standard procedure in the towns and communities where I've lived for the past 20 years. Here we call it a 'liquor accord'; police and elders and other community groups (police, DCP) have deemed it an absolute necessity for social order. Not only can you just buy cask wine for 2 hours a day (and the line can be 50 people plus long) but when a funeral is being held all sales of take away alcohol is prohibited before and for the duration. No take away for a week sometimes.

    In these places cask wine is the cheapest and best bang for your buck, there's no huge selection of bottled wine (maybe a dozen reds and whites all starting at $20) and the price of spirits is prohibitively expensive.

    If you don't like it you can always go for a quick drive across the border to Alice, a mere 1600km away.
    The Land Council and Police here go one better. You have to have a licence check (your ID is entered into a computer and sent away to be checked that you havent been arrested ect). Then when its all clear you get a photo taken and you get a special liquor licence. Then you liquor licence is added electronically to your drivers license. Then when you go to purchase alcohol you have to give over your license (they scan it into the machine to check for a valid liquor licence). You can only drink at your house if you have a valid licence, when you visit friends, you can only drink if they have a licence, you can also drink at the pub. I live in a dry community. They also dont sell cask here. The spirits are crazy expensive too.

    No grog until 4pm? Not so bad IMO. Here you can only get any takeaway from midday-10pm. If you dont like it, you can hop on a plane, fly back to mainland and find a place to drink (at the cost of about $1000 for airfares)

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    Quote Originally Posted by MsTruth View Post
    It also smacks of racism as this rule mostly appears in towns/suburbs with high Aboriginal populations.
    I agree. There is a pub/bottle shop at the end of my street and wow we have some problems on this otherwise quiet street. Alcohol, drugs, you name it. But because it's generally pesky white teens, nothing is done about it.

    Personally, the sale of alcohol after hours wouldn't bother me. I do think cask wine is too cheap and available to people struggling with alcoholism and young teens etc. It's not getting to the root of the issues though, which is what is needed.

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    Yeah, I think it's a total waste of time and I think the way it's done is racially discriminative.

    "What the white man giveth, the white man taketh away"

    >vomits<

    I have no issue with individuals creating a dry community for their community (independent of the state), it's no different to my MIL having a liquor ban on her property.

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  10. #37
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    Nmgb is offline No relationship is all sunshine, but two people can share one umbrella and survive the storm ♡
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    Quote Originally Posted by trishalishous View Post
    Why should I have to travel at the speed limit just because others cant control thier cars at high speeds?
    Seriously?

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    Default Re: Limiting sale of alcohol?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nmgb View Post
    I don't drink. At all. But what if they're already in town say doing groceries and they would like a cask of wine? Why should they have to make the extra trip just because others can't drink responsibly? And why only casks of wine? Why not just keep the store closed until 4pm?
    Agreed! I wouldn't want to do two trips. I don't drink cask wine but if I'm out and I want to buy a bottle of wine or champagne or port for the weekend I'd be peeved to have to do another trip if it applied to all alcohol.

    Sent from my GT-P5100 using BubHub

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    I very rarely drink myself, but id say if someone really wants alcohol they will drink and drink when they want to.

    Alcohol is a real problem tho but i dont think this will have any real impact

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    If you have lived in a problem area where it SHOULD be dry zone :| We have people drinking in a local park and its HORRIBLE! They come from down north and police do nothing. Little kids there, urinating/using the grass as toilets... ugh! once I had a heart attack because they got water out of our front yard i thought he was going to bash me

    I think this is a great practice that should be everywhere! Lots of people would spend there money on other things first instead of booze/smokes. if this was put into place
    Last edited by Mod-pegasus; 06-12-2012 at 12:23.


 
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