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  1. #51
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    Default First baby - Public or Private - what are your thoughts?

    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    I don't know... But I doubt they would kick someone out a room for you and it is on a first come first served basis. I could be wrong but how would they know when to reserve the room dor you.

    I did get my own room though

    Don't meant to offend but so you have support in place for after the birth because your sleep patterns will of course be altered?
    It's not a necessity. If it was I'd just go private. But it would b beneficial. I've met with the mental health team in the pregnancy department and I forgot to ask about this. I'd gone to see them about getting pregnant on my meds, I'm not on meds anymore so I'm not sure how involved they will be in my case when I do get pregnant. I was guessing they would b monitoring me through the pregnancy so it would b in my file about needing the room, also my psych would call (she's already called them b4 and sent then my case notes).
    My psych has gone thru a lot repeatedly about stress afterwards and sleep and triggers and risk of PND. There are private clinics I can check into where they can look after me and the baby together if I need it (don't see this happening but its an option) I also have family to help, i don't work, husband is entitled to paternity leave etc.

  2. #52
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    Default First baby - Public or Private - what are your thoughts?

    That's great! The Women's was fantastic so I'm sure they will give you the care you and bub both need. I would definitely go back there.

  3. #53
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cue View Post
    Yep that's what I meant. In private you typically have a lot more choice. Plenty of women have an epidural in their birth plan for example, I don't think it's fair to automatically chalk that up to the private hospital pushing intervention.

    Lol, this has really gone off on a tangent - sorry OP!
    I'm not actually sure if this study includes women opting for c/s seems kind of silly for it to given it's about low risk women giving birth not about women choosing to have c/s?

    This is about the "too posh to push" myth.

    http://theconversation.edu.au/forget...-sections-4986 there is a link to the study in the article.
    Other factors?


    When we’re not using the “too posh to push” or “asking for it” explanation for rising caesarean rates, health professionals resort to the “too old, too sick and too fat” mantra to explain away our responsibility for the rise. In other words, women are giving birth at older ages, they have more health complications and are increasingly overweight.


    All of this is true on one level – women are older and more likely to be overweight and this all increases the chance of complications – but caesareans are rising among all groups, regardless of age, risk factors and weight.


    In fact, there is a greater correlation between your postcode and private insurance status and the caesarean section rate than being older, overweight, sick or asking for it. And the healthiest, wealthiest women who are least likely to be obese, smoke or have poor health (women giving birth in private hospitals with private obstetricians) are nearly twice as likely to have a caesarean section.


    When a healthy first-time mother in this country has less chance than not of having a normal birth, then something is seriously wrong.


    It’s time to abandon the “too old, too fat, too sick and asking for it" mantra and stop blaming women for the high rates of caesarean births. Instead, we need to address the real problem: we health providers are too often scared, impatient and inadequately informed to give women a real choice.

  4. #54
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    I went public both times. First time i had to share a room, but it didnt bother me at all. Second time i had a huge room, that had 4 beds in it, all to myself for 3 days. It was great. I was very happy with all the staff and how i was treated. I guess it comes down to if you want to see the same midwife all the way through, and have your own room (which sometimes may not happen depending on numbers). Private seems to cost a lot of money, and im just curious what makes it better??

  5. #55
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    Default First baby - Public or Private - what are your thoughts?

    For me it's mainly the OB of choice and the stay after birth. A good Gf of mine had her bub a year after me at a public hospy here in bris. Whilst she had a great birth she had a horrible post natal stay that irrevocably damaged her bf relationship with her bubby.

    I had an LC visit me each day (5days) I was in to help with attachment. Each feed was supervised by a mw those first few days. Even though dd1 lost 400gms (4kg at birth) in the first two days her Paed was not fussed and said the more she boobed the more milk I would have.

    My friends bub lost 190gms (3.5kg at birth) she was threatened that DOCS would be called if she didn't supplement with formula. She never saw the same LC and they weighed him twice each day and made her feel horrible. Told her to give bub a dummy and she should pump!!!!

    This is why I refused to go public second time round and ever.

    Quote Originally Posted by dee2628 View Post
    I went public both times. First time i had to share a room, but it didnt bother me at all. Second time i had a huge room, that had 4 beds in it, all to myself for 3 days. It was great. I was very happy with all the staff and how i was treated. I guess it comes down to if you want to see the same midwife all the way through, and have your own room (which sometimes may not happen depending on numbers). Private seems to cost a lot of money, and im just curious what makes it better??

  6. #56
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    Wow, now im never going pubic! Glad I chose private.

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    That doesnt sound good for your friend.
    I had a very positive experience both times going public.

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    I went private first time, was told I'd be induced 11 days over at the most, had an episiotomy, had to have my placenta manually removed afterwards and so was given a general anesthetic which made recovery hard as I had pain and a catheter and a drip of antibiotics....baby had jaundice and was put in special care on formula away from me for 2 days...my aftercare was tremendous and I had a private room so got lots of sleep.

    My second baby was in the Brisbane birth centre...at no time would they tell me I'd be induced, it was up to me and they'd offer more monitoring after 41 weeks...if my placenta was retained again they'd only give a spinal block, never a general as they are more dangerous and harder to recover from...they do not do episiotomies unless you request one...baby was jaundice but they keep them in your room with you and do not give formula unless there's a problem...aftercare left a lot to be desired due to room sharing and understaffed but everything, and I mean everything was free, whereas private I was out of pocket 4000 I think. I got no sleep for 5 nights though. I don't know what I'd do next time, probably go birth centre again as it was midwife centred and I was in control of my birth choices. My midwives were just so beautiful and it felt right to be looked after by women, not a man. The main thing is you get a healthy baby and feel safe and in charge of your own choices. No one should be telling you what to do with your birth.
    Last edited by starrystarrynight; 30-12-2012 at 13:12.

  9. #59
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    For me I was under the same ob for both pregnancies and delivered in the same private hospital both times. My ob knew me and my history, he knew what I did or didn't want. I didn't want a stranger delivering my babies. I was confident I was under the care of a professional and would get the best care and I did! I also had my own private room with a double bed, it was a huge room and I didn't feel like I was in hospital. I wouldn't have it any other way.

  10. #60
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    I haven't read through all the replies so sorry if I'm repeating others. I was really unsure with my first pregnancy whether to go public or private and booked in to see a private Ob but after doing lots of research I changed my mind and put my name down for the birthcentre (public). This was THE BEST decision I have ever made! If you have access to this type of facility and you're expecting a normal pregnancy then I would encourage all women to do this!

    The benefits of private just didn't outweight the cons for me.
    The benefits of private I saw were choosing an OB (although personally I found this stressful and just a random lucky dip really as it depended on the referrals of friends who had nothing to compare to or who your health fund had an agreement with).
    Having your own room with a double bed so partner can stay (I actually got this for free at the birthcentre and at my local private hospital at least there was no guarantee that you'd get a room with a double bed anyway).
    Seeing the same carer throughout my pregnancy (a birthcentre or midwife team model also allows this but actually guarantees you'll get a known carer at your birth rather than with private there is a high chance your OB will NOT be present at the birth if you birth on the weekend or after hours).
    A longer post-natal stay in hospital. Initially I was a bit worried about going straight home after the birth rather than spending several nights in hospital but I went home 9hrs after my son was born and the last 2hr were really waiting for a paed to give bubs the all clear. I would not have wanted to stay any longer, it just wasn't necessary. I had home visits by my midwife for 2 weeks after the birth which was absolutely fantastic and to anyone pregnant for the first time I'd encourage you to find out about the post-natal care services in the first couple of weeks as I had lots of feeding problems when my son was 11 days old and if I didn't have a midwife to visit me at home I doubt I would've been able to continue breastfeeding. This type of service is WAY MORE important than getting your own room, I really can't stress that enough. A friend of mine stayed 5 nights in a private hospital and then had bad mastitis when she got home, she was so over the whole hospital thing she didn't go back when she should've and ended up really sick and weaned her baby much earlier than she'd wanted to. Persoanlly I found being at home I was way more comfortable getting my boobs out and still had my midwife to help me out with visits at home.

    Negatives of private are that the c-section/intervention rates are higher (this is just fact, ~50% of women in private hospitals have c-sections compared to around 30% in QLD public hospitals) and apparently the whole too posh to push thing is rare. Personally my major goal was to come out of childbirth in one piece with no stiches if possible. I did (and maybe I just got lucky) but I also think it was because I made a lot of choices to minimise that possibility.

    Your birthing choices are much more limited in the private setting (at least in Brisbane, could be different elsewhere). I decided I wanted a waterbirth and that was just not an option anywhere except the birthcentre. (It was fantastic and I'd highly recommend by the way especially if you want to avoid stiches). A friend who gave birth at the local private hospital I almost chose was told she could birth in any position she liked as long as it was on the bed! I thought that was unbelievably rude and if it was me I would've told the midwife she was there to help me and not the otherway round and that I'd birth where ever I felt like it thank you very much! Also at my local public hospital there is a choice of birthcentre care, midwife team, shared care with your GP or seeing an OB (admittedly probably a different one each time).

    A few other negatives for me about the smaller private hospital I'd looked at were that you didn't get to know the hospital midwives before the birth and they're the ones that do most of the care during the birth so what was the point of getting to know an OB? Also if there had been something majorly wrong with the baby he would've been transferred to the public hospital and most likely separated from me as I wasn't a patient there.

    Also of course the cost. I downgraded my PHI as soon as I got accepted in the birthcentre. This has saved my thousands alone and I wouldn't choose to go private in the future anyway. Every single scan, test, appointment etc was free at the public hospital and I never had to wait longer than 10min for any of my appointments. I'm sure you do get better food in a private hospital though!

    Obviously everyone has different experiences and different preferences and sometimes there is just a bit of luck involved.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Noty For This Useful Post:

    FirstTimeMama34  (17-05-2015)


 

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