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  1. #31
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    DD1 used to feel very self-conscious about her curly hair (she has ringlets) and said some of the kids called her "curly top" or something like that. She wanted me to straighten her hair for school which I wouldn't do (her hair is soooo thick). I want her to accept herself for what she has and I don't want to have to do it all the time! But if it's something she perceived as a flaw in herself I don't know - I think it depends so much on the child and on what the issue is.

    I guess I'm not sure what I would have done. I don't think I would have let her use concealer, but I think until you are in that situation it's hard to know. You seem to have a very good relationship with your daughter and she knows you have her back, which is a good thing.

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    As a one off I don't think it's a bad thing. She now knows that she can do something about them should she feel like they are a big deal when she is older.

    I was allowed to shave my legs from whatever age I wanted. Not because I had a lot of freedom (I didn't!) but my mother was self-concious about hers as a child and decided that I wouldn't have to go through that. I think I was about 10 the first time I did it.

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    OJandMe is offline I am the strength my children will have.
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    Depends if she starts feeling like she 'needs' it. I don't think it's a bad thing once in a while, but if she starts attaching it to how she 'needs' to look then possibly that might not be good.

    Maybe try tea bags, or cucumbers... those old recipes that are 'fun' but you can't wear them out, so she feels as though she's doing something about the darkness under her eyes, but that's all she 'has' to do. iykwim.

  4. #34
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    I dont have a daughter so this is just my opinion on it.

    Personally, unless it was causing obvious issues (bullying, teasing, huge amounts of sadness/pain to the child) then I think I would talk to my child and explain everyone is different and make up is for adults to "play with" blah blah blah. Id let my daughter wear makeup for fun occasionally but doubt I would teach her at such a young age how to cover her minor 'flaws' or 'imperfections'.

    I have dark circles and have learnt to live with them. I barely wear any make up anyway. Cant be bothered with it (and I grew up as a dancer, being COVERED in makeup). I can imagine that a child who watches her mother put make up on every day might possibly be more inclined to want to try and cover her 'flaws' too...monkey see, monkey do.

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    I have been in a similar situation to your daughter, except I snuck the concealer from my older sister because I was afraid that my Mum would say no (I was also too embarrassed to ask her). I think it's obvious that you have a wonderful, close relationship with her.

    My situation was slightly different...I had a skin condition that I was attempting to conceal. I wasn't being teased about it and I didn't grow up in a house where looks were focused on much. I was just aware that my skin looked different to usual and I wanted it to look the same as before. I can't imagine how I would have felt if I finally plucked up the courage to ask Mum to apply it and she said no. That would feel awful.

    I think you have done the right thing in this situation and I would do the same.

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    Default Re: Putting concealer on a small child... wrong or acceptable?

    I wouldn't do it. I'd just be saying things like "so what if you have dark circles? It doesn't mean anything, it's no biggie! We're all different and we're all beautiful." Etc etc...

    I have freckles. Lots of freckles with rosy red cheeks. And pasty white skin. I always hated my freckles, always. But I'm glad my mum used comments like above in an effort for me to not worry about it. I have no beef with my freckles or rosy cheeks now

    *I can haz typos*
    Last edited by Lillynix; 26-11-2012 at 15:04.

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    No, I don't think it will encourage her to be happy with & accept herself the way she is. And self acceptance is incredibly important, especially for girls & women with the odds so stacked against us/so much brainwashing and obsession over looks.

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    I personally wouldn't be letting a child that young use makeup.
    I would be taking her to the dr to investigate the problem as there could very well be a more serious issue. Dark circles under the eyes could mean; lack of sleep, anaemia, kidney issues, food allergies, envirnmental issues, food allergies, adrenal fatigue. Getting more rest, drinking more water and a healthier diet may assist.

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    Personally I wouldn't of, but I don't judge you for doing it. I would worry that it would then be requested all the time and become an every day requirement to 'cover up'. And then what happens at the next flaw she sees... does she need to cover that up too... and being so young she's got quite a while to go until she's a teenager which is when I personally would be allowing things like that. JMO though.

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    As a side note, it can indicate a food intolerance. Gluten and dairy intolerances commonly cause dark circles under eyes. Have you considered an elimination diet? More for her general health than to eliminate the dark circles


 

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