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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackEyedPea View Post
    I think providing encouragement and giving honest and correct feedback on a student's work are mutually exclusive, and not marking a student's work correctly for fear of discouraging them does not benefit them in the long run...?! Are teachers so concerned these days with offending, upsetting children these days that we can't provide honest and constructive feedback? that is a problem with education these days. Children do need to learn how to cope with set-backs and be resilient, to learn their strengths as well as weaknesses! Spelling and grammar are crucial to a basic education - it astonishes me how badly one of my teacher friends writes actually. But it should always be corrected IMO, no matter the subject.
    Quote Originally Posted by ~Bec~ View Post
    I think that not correcting a spelling error 'just because' it's maths is not really good enough but I do think that discretion should be applied.

    I also think it's really sad that any child thinks they are stupid, I think that's more detrimental to a child's development that any over or under corrections.

    I am a STRONG believer in teaching and enforcing correct English. As a school student if I ever gave my mother anything to read that I had written she would circle any English errors in red pen, I would then have to re-write correcting all the errors and then she would read for content. It used to annoy me so much at the time but I am eternally grateful now. In fact my job now requires me to have excellent English skills. (I have a very enviable job as I work from home, in the evenings and around the children and whilst I don't earn 'good' money it's certainly a whole lot better than what others earn!)
    I am glad to hear this because I hope my kids appreciate that I do do this they hate it and whine and moan when I make sure that things are correct. Be it history, english or any subject where they have to answer questions, I make them use a complete sentence, no spelling errors, and proper punctuation or they have to re do it. I also make them write book reports or essays by hand before they get to type it up because the computer will correct the errors for them which I dont want them to do I want them to know the mistakes.

  2. #42
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    I never ever mark in red pen and write corrections above in pencil. I write a comment at the end in blue biro.

  3. #43
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    Is there a compromise where a teacher could correct the spelling and but not lose grades? Meaning that at least the spelling is corrected but it's the content that is being graded rather than the spelling/grammar?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deserama View Post
    Is there a compromise where a teacher could correct the spelling and but not lose grades? Meaning that at least the spelling is corrected but it's the content that is being graded rather than the spelling/grammar?
    A teacher of a dyslexic child will definitely grade content - this does not mean they overlook spelling but if the focus was always on spelling the child may never, ever finish a creative story, be able to write a plot, expand on characterisation because they couldn't get past writing 1 sentence due to a fixation on spelling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    PS. Spelling mistakes irk me no end, but I figure if someone has achieved success because a teacher saw their strengths and built on them, I'll forgive them if I overhear them saying they 'brought it at Kmart'.
    Nooo no no NOO! It's bought!! Lol

    I get what people are saying here in that teachers feel correcting spelling and grammar is sometimes detrimental to a child's confidence. I just feel that spelling and grammar, speaking well, should be the groundwork of a basic education. It's truly shocking how badly so many Aussies speak and write. These kids that struggle with writing and grammar always have strengths in other areas - perhaps athletics, or arts. How do you protect the feelings of disappointment for kids who suck at sports? Give them a medal for coming last?

    It's ok for kids to suck at things and struggle in certain areas. Yes it's important to identify their strengths, but not at the expense of Ignoring weaknesses IMO. With things like spelling and grammar, repetition is key.

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  7. #46
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    Default Spin Off: Not correcting every spelling mistake

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackEyedPea View Post
    Nooo no no NOO! It's bought!! Lol

    I get what people are saying here in that teachers feel correcting spelling and grammar is sometimes detrimental to a child's confidence. I just feel that spelling and grammar, speaking well, should be the groundwork of a basic education. It's truly shocking how badly so many Aussies speak and write. These kids that struggle with writing and grammar always have strengths in other areas - perhaps athletics, or arts. How do you protect the feelings of disappointment for kids who suck at sports? Give them a medal for coming last?

    It's ok for kids to suck at things and struggle in certain areas. Yes it's important to identify their strengths, but not at the expense of Ignoring weaknesses IMO. With things like spelling and grammar, repetition is key.
    This is why we have weekly spelling activities and tests.

    Grammar can be corrected when speaking.

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    I went to a grammar school - (obviously) they were pretty anal about spelling and grammar, no matter the subject. To this day my school friends are the best writers and speakers I know. I noticed it on FB when we all got back in touch after so many years. My mum also used to correct our speech constantly (and very annoyingly) at home.

    I was responding to the post(s) which commented that as long as a teacher is focused on a child's strengths, it's ok to ignore weaknesses. Isn't great teaching about addressing both? Especially with basic things like English language.

    I don't really see how not marking spelling/grammatical errors does a child any favours simply because it's not English homework. You can still praise/grade them for an excellent piece of work while making separate comments about the spelling. A PP said they use blue pen and that there's no need to have big red crosses all over the page. it's not like you're giving them the cane for making errors, just drawing attention to it whilst not necessarily marking them down for it...?

    I don't know, I guess I'm quite shocked that teachers ignore spelling and grammar errors simply because it's not English homework and they don't want to upset the child. Are we raising a generation of kids that at too sensitive to handle any criticism??

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  10. #48
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    Well, I must be a bit of a hard-*** with my grade 4/5/6 then because their spelling and grammar is corrected on every piece of work.

    However, I don't just hand the books back en mass and let the kids deal with the consequences- for the majority of the grade who are doing well I do.. but those who I know struggle (eg I have a grade 6 girl who I am convinced is dyslexic- or at least has erlands but the prin refuses to test as she is about to go off to high school) I will always individually conference, and use the 'sandwich' method:

    *positives of her work
    *parts that need improvement that I have marked (still pointing out the positives- making good phonetic choices, starting to use punctuation to break up long sentences etc)
    * Overall positives (I can see you tried really hard, I'm so proud of you, I love the way you mentioned x etc)

    Out of a grade of 17, I have maybe 5 students who need this daily conference. I have 2 that need a conference because they are advanced and need direction on where to go next.

    But, in response to the original post- I agree wholeheartedly that sometimes it may not be appropriate to correct spelling for every piece of work handed in- it's just that I only have 17 students and so I have the time to sit down and work through it all with them.

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  12. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomsie View Post
    Well, I must be a bit of a hard-*** with my grade 4/5/6 then because their spelling and grammar is corrected on every piece of work.

    However, I don't just hand the books back en mass and let the kids deal with the consequences- for the majority of the grade who are doing well I do.. but those who I know struggle (eg I have a grade 6 girl who I am convinced is dyslexic- or at least has erlands but the prin refuses to test as she is about to go off to high school) I will always individually conference, and use the 'sandwich' method:

    *positives of her work
    *parts that need improvement that I have marked (still pointing out the positives- making good phonetic choices, starting to use punctuation to break up long sentences etc)
    * Overall positives (I can see you tried really hard, I'm so proud of you, I love the way you mentioned x etc)

    Out of a grade of 17, I have maybe 5 students who need this daily conference. I have 2 that need a conference because they are advanced and need direction on where to go next.

    But, in response to the original post- I agree wholeheartedly that sometimes it may not be appropriate to correct spelling for every piece of work handed in- it's just that I only have 17 students and so I have the time to sit down and work through it all with them.
    17 kids in 4/5/6 - that would be a lovely grade

    Grade size does make a difference no matter what people say, especially in the early years.

    I think your individualised approach is great and should be the standard, conferencing is so important.

  13. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyla View Post
    17 kids in 4/5/6 - that would be a lovely grade

    Grade size does make a difference no matter what people say, especially in the early years.

    I think your individualised approach is great and should be the standard, conferencing is so important.
    I can't lie- it's awesome. I do feel ripped off though because the other two classrooms in the school both have 13 kids


 

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