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  1. #61
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    The policy at DD's pre-school is no nuts and they encourage you to pack healthy foods but not sure how enforced it is as i always pack healthy anyway.
    I make sure DD never has anything with nuts, i don't see why anyone would risk the life of another child over something as easy to avoid as nuts.

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    Default Re: Preschool food policies

    Quote Originally Posted by Cleigh View Post
    Its so funny that as soon as I write something like that everyone jumps down my throat, but seems most other posts just get looked over and ignored. Boo hoo
    I think I know how you feel. But still even that was a little much. I would even say troll like.

    Anyway I have an example of our school. Nuts are a big no no. We have several anaphylactic kids at our school. The school have also requested that kids not eat peanut butter or nutella before school but of they do could they do so before showering and before brushing teeth. Fair enough.I agree. Another example.. I make dd1's lunch with left over bacon (well grilled ham cos we ran out of bacon) and eggs from dinner the night before. Later that day dd1 told me she had to sit by herself and eat her sandwich isolated from other kids and had to scrub get hands after wards. Why? Cos "a" kid at school is slightly allergic (hives very occasionally) to egg (which I discovered after questioning the teacher to which the teacher said wasn't even really a known allergy just suspected as one). Ok. But she is allowed to order a curried egg sandwich from the canteen the next week. With ham if she wanted it added as an extra filling. My option was healthier as it want full of artificial cr@p, mayonnaise etc..
    Yet when having dd1 checked for wheat intolerance and on a special diet(which the teacher was very well aware of) just over a year later, she was given food containing wheat. (which was a whole other thread). Our school also DOS the traffic light system but IMO it is a joke as most of the stuff on the canteen menu is amber and the majority of "green" items should be Amber. How is mini pizza, hamburger and salad, hot chicken roll and mayo, cheesie, Mac and cheese etc considered to be a healthy option? What's the difference between a "green" chicken wrap snack and an "Amber" hot chicken wrap snack? An "Amber" play water or a "green" lol drink (which has more sugar)?

    I think it could be time a formal national standard was introduced.

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    Cleigh  (13-11-2012)

  4. #63
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    Default Preschool food policies

    Wow, write a post and log off bubhub for a few hours and see what happens????!!!?!

    DS won't be old enough for preschool for 2 years so it's not a problem for me at the moment. I was just shocked at what was ok to take and what wasn't.

    These 'rules' are from the director of the preschool and from what I can gather most/all of the preschool committee don't agree with her but she is the one there everyday at lunch saying what the kids can and can't eat. I also gathered it wasn't so much because of allergies that they couldn't have those things. What was upsetting one of the mums I was talking to was all the preservatives in packet stuff.

    I can sort if see that banana bread can be seen as 'cake' but I have made it without much sugar and I'm sure muesli bars have heaps more sugar in them not to mention other crap.

  5. #64
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    The whole banana bread thing would probably annoy me in our circumstance. Mainly because have you ever tried to find a wheat, soy, nut free, low egg bread that a 4 year old will actually eat? For the longest time banana bread was our alternative to days on end of rice crackers. Even then we still have to make our own. But if there was a legitimate health and safety reason for saying no then we would comply.

    I dread the day DS goes to school, not because of him or his allergies per se but other peoples attitudes towards him and them. At 4, even 5 or 6, he is still very much reliant on other people to help keep him 'safe'. Honestly I think all allergies should be treated with some seriousness, as you can't tell when a once placid allergy will suddenly invoke a different reaction from the body. Not only that, but I would hate for another child to feel the pain and discomfort that I have watched my DS go through due to something that I could have help prevent. No child deserves to feel uncomfortable due to someone elses complacency.

    Allergies are easy enough to live with when you do it every day, whats hard is knowing you have to rely on other people too.

    Cleigh I hope your child never has an allergy friend! I fear for them if they do.

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    Default Re: Preschool food policies

    The banana bread would be sugar content and.possible almonds,
    Though to offer musli bars as al alternative in nuts and insane.




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    Default Preschool food policies

    I think the problem is that some pp have been annoyed at schools telling them what they can give their kids but you guys are not the ones that they are targeting- you give your kids good foods and the occasional snack but there are a lot of parents who have no clue about nutrition and they are the ones I assume the schools are trying to educate - our kids are getting fatter, diabetes is in the rise as are allergies and other diseases so I like the fact they tell parents what to bring because at least at school someone is watching what these kids eat ( granted some of the policies on shapes etc and selling hamburgers are baffling!)

  8. #67
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    Default Preschool food policies

    Quote Originally Posted by Maia View Post
    The whole banana bread thing would probably annoy me in our circumstance. Mainly because have you ever tried to find a wheat, soy, nut free, low egg bread that a 4 year old will actually eat? For the longest time banana bread was our alternative to days on end of rice crackers. Even then we still have to make our own. But if there was a legitimate health and safety reason for saying no then we would comply.

    I dread the day DS goes to school, not because of him or his allergies per se but other peoples attitudes towards him and them. At 4, even 5 or 6, he is still very much reliant on other people to help keep him 'safe'. Honestly I think all allergies should be treated with some seriousness, as you can't tell when a once placid allergy will suddenly invoke a different reaction from the body. Not only that, but I would hate for another child to feel the pain and discomfort that I have watched my DS go through due to something that I could have help prevent. No child deserves to feel uncomfortable due to someone elses complacency.

    Allergies are easy enough to live with when you do it every day, whats hard is knowing you have to rely on other people too.

    Cleigh I hope your child never has an allergy friend! I fear for them if they do.
    Yes. Agree.

    Also It isn't just anaphylaxis that should merit attention. We should be working together to ensure the risks of a child having Any allergic reaction, anaphylactic or not, is minimal. I sure wouldn't appreciate it if someone elses child brought something to school every day that my child was allergic to. So, if it happened to be spilt on a table, or smeared in the carpet, my child would have to go through not only hives and lip swelling but vicious vomiting...I honestly would be fuming that other childrens parents couldn't care less! Not to be overlooked also is the psychological damage it could do...going to preschool = getting sick so I don't want to go to preschool anymore. The moral of the story?

    Don't send foods with your child that other children are allergic to.

    As to the nutritional value of the food thing, that is a seperate issue.
    Last edited by Smurfberrylizard; 13-11-2012 at 17:32.

  9. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    I think the problem is that some pp have been annoyed at schools telling them what they can give their kids but you guys are not the ones that they are targeting- you give your kids good foods and the occasional snack but there are a lot of parents who have no clue about nutrition and they are the ones I assume the schools are trying to educate - our kids are getting fatter, diabetes is in the rise as are allergies and other diseases so I like the fact they tell parents what to bring because at least at school someone is watching what these kids eat ( granted some of the policies on shapes etc and selling hamburgers are baffling!)
    But is this a schools role? It seems everyday schools are expected to take on more and more responsibility in areas other than education. Teachers are not qualified to act as nutritional advisers, This is clear from the OP, muesli bars a better option than home made banana bread my ar$e.
    Last edited by Euphrosyne; 13-11-2012 at 22:53.

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    Stiflers Mom  (13-11-2012)

  11. #69
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    Default Preschool food policies

    It should not be the schools role but unfortunately the parents who should be teaching/feeding them properly are not - so yes at least at school they can monitor it and I totally get the teachers really don't need the extra work but I think a child's health is just as important ( or actually more important) than its education
    If these stupid governments would get their act together and give the schools some more funding and put a proper nutrition plan into place we wouldn't have this problem!
    I'm spending money to send my son to private schools were I know this is being addressed!

  12. #70
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    Last years when Miss6 went to preschool, and they didn't have any children with nut allergies, so nuts were fine. When there was a party day where we sent in a plate to share, we were told no egg because someone had a reaction to eggs, but there was no restriction on eggs on normal days.

    However, Miss3 is going to the same preschool next year, and we've been told that they have children with problems with nuts and eggs enrolled for next year, to neither nuts nor eggs are allowed.

    I can only assume that the child with a problem with eggs last year wasn't as severe as the one next year.

    ------------

    We were advised no museli bars as they are full of honey or sugar and thus not really a healthy snack.


 
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