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  1. #41
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    What I meant was any illness physical or mental of a child is the worst thing for parents to watch . My brother has schizophrenia and that has been so hard on the family , we all love my brother to death but our lives were never like a normal family and now as a parent I want the best possible life for my kids and seeing them not having that would be the hardest thing for me.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by AMFM View Post
    What I meant was any illness physical or mental of a child is the worst thing for parents to watch . My brother has schizophrenia and that has been so hard on the family , we all love my brother to death but our lives were never like a normal family and now as a parent I want the best possible life for my kids and seeing them not having that would be the hardest thing for me.
    Autism and mental illness like schizophrenia are in totally different realms.

    I have a child with autism and one with bipolar, aniexty disorder and depression. They are different as being on a wheelchair and cancer.

  3. #43
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    Yes you are right they are different but I'm not comparing them here!!! You say autism cause meltdown over very small things well with my brother we had to witness meltdown over things they don't even exist and that is not easy and I think if any one claims that its not hard to witness is not telling truth
    My baby doesn't have vision or much vision in one eye , the good eye also doesn't make eye contact hence me thinking he could be autistic and seeing him with vision problem has been by far the most difficult thing for me to witness bkz we as parents see how much potential our little angles have and any syndrome , physical disability or mental/emotional illness that limits our children is very hard on parents, at least it has been for me !!!

  4. #44
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    @AMFM your concern for your child is obvious from your posts, but I do think you're getting completely ahead of yourself by focusing so intently on what your child may not even have.

    He's only a newborn and it's too early to worry to this degree.

    I also think you need to choose your words carefully when you're corresponding with parents of ASD children, as we can be a fiercely protective bunch (it comes with the role!).

    There are far, far worse things than ASD. My son can be challenging, but he's so much more than a diagnosis. He's funny, intelligent, ridiculously cute and affectionate.

    I'm sorry to hear what you've been through with your brother, that must have been extremely difficult

  5. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Mod-Degrassi For This Useful Post:

    HollyGolightly81  (26-12-2015),LoveLivesHere  (26-12-2015),Tamtam  (26-12-2015),zoz  (27-12-2015)

  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Degrassi View Post
    @AMFM your concern for your child is obvious from your posts, but I do think you're getting completely ahead of yourself by focusing so intently on what your child may not even have.

    He's only a newborn and it's too early to worry to this degree.

    I also think you need to choose your words carefully when you're corresponding with parents of ASD children, as we can be a fiercely protective bunch (it comes with the role!).

    There are far, far worse things than ASD. My son can be challenging, but he's so much more than a diagnosis. He's funny, intelligent, ridiculously cute and affectionate.

    I'm sorry to hear what you've been through with your brother, that must have been extremely difficult
    Thank you you said that so much better than I could.

  7. #46
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    Default I'm so over autism

    AMFM, you've said your DS that you are worried about has sight issues in one eye and the other one he's rarely making eye contact, is that right? Could the lack of eye contact be an issue with how his eye has to work to make up for the other eye?

    He's only 12 weeks old and I totally get worrying about every single possible issue but you need to remember that he is only 12 weeks old. They change so, so much every week, month, year that it is really not worth stressing about something like this. There's no way to diagnose him until he's older--IF he does have it, big IF. And I fear you're going to read into everything he does and worry about it rather than just enjoying the amazing little baby that he is.

    I went through a short phase of worrying DS couldn't hear because he was never startled by loud noises. He's fine. He didn't sit up independently until 9 1/2 months, roll until 7 months, crawl until after his first birthday and walk until 17 months. If I compared how slow he was with these things to other kids I would have gone crazy. He is now a very typical, busy, crazy toddler.

    Enjoy your baby boy and try and stop reading into this. If it's worrying you that much, see a pediatrician to put your mind at ease.
    Last edited by HollyGolightly81; 26-12-2015 at 19:46.

  8. #47
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    Hi ladies hope all doing well , I'm sorry if my words came across offensive , I wasn't trying to disrespect or insensitive I was simply expressing my feelings and concerns about my son , I'm also reading and typing in between feeding , changing , putting to sleep 2 babies ( my husband is back to work and I don't have much support else where ) so I perhaps haven't had the chance to read what I typed.

    Hollygolightly thanks for your post , it really gives me hope to read stories like yours so is he complitlly normal in terms of achieving other milestones ? I guess every baby is different in their own way I guess most of my concern about my son comes as I compare him to his twin brother , he is acting like a 6 months old. I have been to pd he thinks it's a bit unusual for him not to fix and follow so did a head ultrasound and ran a few blood tests and all came normal . We then saw and eye specialist and went to the eye hospital , one eye has retina damage but the other eye doesn't follow either so he is now diagnosed with delayed eye maturation and they have given him up to 6 month to improve but there are loads of other possibilities and when I feel down I keep thinking about them all
    And you are right I feel like I'm not enjoying my babies as I'm too concerned about this issue but I really want him to lead a normal life and it aches my heart to think it might not happen . The hardest thing for me is ten waiting game of just observe and see what happens !!!

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    Default I'm so over autism

    My son is developing completely normally, even him doing those milestones 'slow' is considered normal because every baby learns at a different pace, they all achieve their milestones at completely different rates and you will drive yourself crazy if you continue to compare--which I understand that since you have a twin is hard not to do.

    An example: this Christmas we went to a friend's house who has a boy the same age as DS (22/23months old). Their son seemed to completely understand about Santa, that he came down the chimney and brought the presents whereas my son had no interest in Santa or what he did, definitely didn't understand why we were making him sit down and open presents. But then my son has started to be able to build train track (link the pieces) and figured out how to push his foot to make his scooter move on the first trip to the park whereas their DS hasn't figured that stuff out yet and has had his scooter longer. Both completely normal boys developing fine, they just have different interests with what they are willing to focus their little toddler attention spans on.

    You have two boys that although they are twins are still completely separate people and will be very different. I think you have been given an explanation for your son's sight right now and you need to accept that explanation until his next exam and try to stop reading into other causes. You only know what you know and that's all you can do. Like I said, they change so, so much--so quickly. Give him a chance to surprise you.
    Last edited by HollyGolightly81; 27-12-2015 at 18:31.

  10. #49
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    Thank you very much , I actually feel better now . It's hard very hard not to worry some times but I guess we really don't have a choice do we ?

    I'm gone follow up with the eye hospital and their paediatrics just so I know I have done everything possible.

    Have you heard of anyone doing an MRI go their little ones ? Does it have any side effects?

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to AMFM For This Useful Post:

    HollyGolightly81  (28-12-2015)


 

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