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  1. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    I am a primary school teacher and we don't rely on parents for any of those things.

    We have a woman who runs out canteen and it's her business. She operates out of about 10 schools.

    We do all our own fundraising, book fairs, fetes. The p & c will get involved, but that is a handful of people.

    We don't have any parent helpers.
    That's great for you but at DD's school every single bit of fundraising is done by the P&C and a lot of the people who volunteer to help at events like sausage sizzles, book fairs at SAHPs. We also have 2 people employed to work at the canteen, but they also rely on 3 parents to roster on each day it's open. Another parent runs the roster.

    I thought I was pretty clear I was talking about DD's school. Personally I love the fact so many parents are so hands on - we raised enough money to pay for every computer at the school, as well as state of the art playground equipment.

    As for once they go to high school, I would hazard a guess most SAHPs who had been out of the workforce by that stage would be unemployable?
    Last edited by Sonja; 22-10-2012 at 19:31.

  2. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyla View Post
    I didn't realise being a good role model was dependent on being in paid work.

    I thought it was based on the kind of impact you made wherever and whatever you're doing.
    Me too...but clearly it's about money money money or your ability to make money. Man I've had it so wrong all these years!!!!

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  4. #113
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    Default Stay at home mum vs career mum

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackEyedPea View Post
    In the context of what I was saying though and not so black and white, I think in terms of being a role model, a role model for me is someone who lives by example, is inspiring and motivated. I don't look down on people's life choices, but I don't necessarily see dependency or lack of interests and passion as role model worthy.
    Can I just ask how exactly being a SAHM equals a lack of interests and passion?

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  6. #114
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    Default Re: Stay at home mum vs career mum

    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    That's great for you but at DD's school every single bit of fundraising is done by the P&C and a lot of the people who volunteer to help at events like sausage sizzles, book fairs at SAHPs.

    I thought I was pretty clear I was talking about DD's school.

    As for once they go to high school, I would hazard a guess most SAHPs who had been out of the workforce by that stage would be unemployable?
    Bingo, unemployable, by your 40's. Then what?

    Plus, what you actually said was that *most* state schools run that way, when that is not my experience at all.

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  7. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    Bingo, unemployable, by your 40's. Then what?

    Plus, what you actually said was that *most* state schools run that way, when that is not my experience at all.

    Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710a using BubHub
    Fine. I will limit my comment to the state primary schools I know of in perth, which are about 6. Happy?

    I was merely trying to give an answer to what some parents do when their kids start school. As you admit most parents put in a token effort. Our school wouldn't thrive as much as it does without those that don't.

    Anywho, I'm working tomorrow so have to get ready for the million things I have to do before I start at 930.

    By the way, you flatter me. I will be in my 50s when my kids start high school.

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    Default Re: Stay at home mum vs career mum

    Genuine question, but what if neither the mum nor dad chose to work? So, if they were both financially independent?

    That doesn't mean they would be sitting watching Oprah all day. It means they wouldn't have to work unless they wanted to and, instead, could pursue anything they wanted in life.

    Would that make them bad role models too?

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    I am busier now with the kids in school then I ever was when they were at home as babies/toddlers. I am parent helper 3 times a week, I always attend school assembly and help in the tuckshop. Then we have after school activities every day after school. And excursions etc. on top of that.

    I have no intention of going back to work. I'm unsure why paid employment is an indicator of your worthiness as a role model. I don't intend on twiddling my thumbs - I have lots of ideas and plans I intend to spend a lot of time on. Working for someone else isn't one of them! And I have absolutely no doubt that this will not impact on my children's success at all.

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  11. #118
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    I just really find the concept of financial dependency only being something looked down upon if it's dependency on your husband unbalanced. Never mind being dependent on an employer.

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  13. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Girl X View Post
    Genuine question, but what if neither the mum nor dad chose to work? So, if they were both financially independent?

    That doesn't mean they would be sitting watching Oprah all day. It means they wouldn't have to work unless they wanted to and, instead, could pursue anything they wanted in life.

    Would that make them bad role models too?

    Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710a using BubHub
    No. I have wonderful friends, raising children who are in this position. They simply don't need to work and don't. They're great role models for their kids, kind, caring, generous, educated people who make a difference in so many ways.

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  15. #120
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    Default Stay at home mum vs career mum

    Quote Originally Posted by BlissedOut View Post
    I just really find the concept of financial dependency only being something looked down upon if it's dependency on your husband unbalanced. Never mind being dependent on an employer.
    Exactly.

    And the thing is, often times husbands are just as dependent as their wives who stay at home.

    I have a close friend who left her husband and while she hasn't had an easy ride reeastablishing herself professionally, he has also struggled because all of a sudden on the days he has custody he is doing school pick ups and juggles. Even with after school care he has to have an absolute finish time at work.

    Dependency isn't always a one way street.


 

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