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  1. #21
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    Default Re: Dangerous home-birthers spoil it for the rest of us

    Quote Originally Posted by BlissedOut View Post
    Free birthing when there is the alternative of home birthing with a midwife is IMO negligent.
    And IMO putting all the responsibility of your birth onto a medical professional negligent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrsdj1234 View Post
    And IMO putting all the responsibility of your birth onto a medical professional negligent.
    Maybe so, but why is it an awful thing to have a qualified, experienced professional on hand?

  3. #23
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    I guess I see birth as a normal physiological event for both participants, I wouldn't go to the hospital to poop unless I had an issue or my poop had an issue and I don't feel like I need a medical professional in my home to watch either.

    Now some would say but what if your baby did have an issue? Well what if your baby had an issue and you were at home, what would you do? You would go to hospital and so would I. I don't see birth as some big huge dangerous thing a baby has to go through (this article just perpetuates this myth with the head thing) birth is a normal event for a baby, they are designed for it (which is why their heads mould and why the orchestra of hormones in birth is so important).

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    Default Re: Dangerous home-birthers spoil it for the rest of us

    Quote Originally Posted by BlissedOut View Post
    Maybe so, but why is it an awful thing to have a qualified, experienced professional on hand?
    Why is it so bad not to have one?
    For me, a midwife would have been an unwanted person involved in something that was so intimate. Like having someone watching me have sex, which I'm sure most ppl wouldn't appreciate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by headoverfeet View Post
    I guess I see birth as a normal physiological event for both participants, I wouldn't go to the hospital to poop unless I had an issue or my poop had an issue and I don't feel like I need a medical professional in my home to watch either.

    Now some would say but what if your baby did have an issue? Well what if your baby had an issue and you were at home, what would you do? You would go to hospital and so would I. I don't see birth as some big huge dangerous thing a baby has to go through (this article just perpetuates this myth with the head thing) birth is a normal event for a baby, they are designed for it (which is why their heads mould and why the orchestra of hormones in birth is so important).
    I don't think the MW has to watch, just be on hand to answer questions and help if needed. In my ideal system a MW would be chosen by the expectant mother and would build a relationship during the pregnancy, so you would be comfortable with her and she would understand what was expected of her by you.

    While it might be natural physiological function, it's one that does go wrong occasionally, women have been seeking midwife care for well over 2000 years in most cultures, it's long been considered 'ideal' to have a qualified, experienced set of hands on board.

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlissedOut View Post
    I don't think the MW has to watch, just be on hand to answer questions and help if needed. In my ideal system a MW would be chosen by the expectant mother and would build a relationship during the pregnancy, so you would be comfortable with her and she would understand what was expected of her by you.

    While it might be natural physiological function, it's one that does go wrong occasionally, women have been seeking midwife care for well over 2000 years in most cultures, it's long been considered 'ideal' to have a qualified, experienced set of hands on board.
    What an ideal system, I can tell you that the freebirthers who don't choose it out of default still wouldn't use this system. I had access to a medicare funded program and I could've afforded my own private midwife, still chose to freebirth.

    Of course it goes wrong occasionally and that's why we need to improve hospitals attitudes towards homebirthing/freebirthing women so women would feel confident in collaborating with them rather than fearful of being reported to DOCS or being treated horribly for their choices if they need to transfer.

    Women have also been birthing alone for well over 2000 years.

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    Default Re: Dangerous home-birthers spoil it for the rest of us

    Just because I chose to freebirth my last baby, doesn't mean I am anti-hospital nor does it mean I go around advocating freebirth and trying to convince others to do it. That was my personal decision to make, and I'd never advocate it to another, but I would support another who had already made that decision for themselves, unless I thought there was a reason they shouldn't consider it as an option.

    This shrill, radical birther also has some smarts

    *I can haz typos*

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  10. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lillynix View Post
    Just because I chose to freebirth my last baby, doesn't mean I am anti-hospital nor does it mean I go around advocating freebirth and trying to convince others to do it. That was my personal decision to make, and I'd never advocate it to another, but I would support another who had already made that decision for themselves, unless I thought there was a reason they shouldn't consider it as an option.

    This shrill, radical birther also has some smarts

    *I can haz typos*
    Exactly.

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    I agree with her.
    I do believe that the actions of a few extremists are damaging the homebirth movement. Look at the women who insist on birthing twins at home. Yes it was their right (and the author clearly said she knew it was their right) but when the birth went wrong (I'm talking of the case in SA) it caused a media frenzy and untold damage to the homebirth movement.
    Most of us agree that homebirth is a good option for low risk women but it is when we see cases like this that we start to feel uncomfortable.

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    Hmmm. Interesting point of views. I was going for a homebirth myself until my blood pressure rose at week 38 and was still "high" when I went into labour. That alongside obstetric Cholestasis which started around the same time reaulted in my private midwife recommending we head to the hospital for the birth. Had a completely drug free intervention free birth at the hospital, and to be honest the hospital actually made labour more difficult for me with the constant blood pressure checking, fetal monitoring, no access to showers/baths in the labor room, and feeling pressured into giving in to having internals to 'check' if i was in labour despite the obvious on-top-of each other contractions. I was in transition when I arrived at the hospital (labour progressed fast). So Whilst i am relatively happy with how this labour went I was disappointed about my blood pressure etc that made me go to the hospital. It was all just incase really, as it wasn't high enough to be on medication for it. Same with the cholestasis, the levels were high but the doctors said they had seen much higher. but I didnt know this until discharge from hospital the following day. So, question for the OP, would you have gone to the hospital in my circumstances? why/why not?


 

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