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  1. #11
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    Google square foot garden- we are garden dummies but my brother is a natural so in May he set one up for us, all organic soil/compost/mulch stuff , he planted some seedlings andsome plants and we now have: sage, thyme, mint ( meant to keep bugs off), carrots, cos lettuce, garlic, chives, beet root and DH just planted basil and coriander today! All we do is water it - I'll try take a photo tomorrow and show you!

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  3. #12
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    We're in the process of setting up our second raised garden. Our first is going really well and we wanted to get more variety so decided to expand! I'm loving it.

    We're growing spinach (silverbeet) which grew really fast and I use it all the time, parsley (also going crazy), broccoli, tomatoes, strawberries, spring onion, chives and chillis. We did have coriander but I took it out because there was way too much of it.

    I the new garden I'm going to plant lettuce, zucchini, basil and maybe cucumber. Not sure what else yet, I'll see what's good for this time of year that we'll use.

  4. #13
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    Easy things to grow are tomatoes, beans, basil (plant next to tomatoes to keep bugs off), lettuce, sage, thyme, oregano, strawberries, rosemary, pumpkin (if you have the room), shallots/spring onions, carrots and cucumbers.

    Raised beds can make it easier especially of you have a poor drainage area or a lot of clay in your soil. It makes things cheaper and easier if you have a compost heap but if you dont have the space or whatever then just add some dynamic lifter, chook poo, seasol, charlie carp, and blood and bone etc to your soil. Your vegies will only be as nutritious as what they can get out of the soil. If you can get a hold of some horse or cow poo it will make your garden take right off.

    Seedlings are definately best when you are getting started since growing from seed can be very hit and miss. If the seed is poor quality then half of what you buy may already be dead. You have to keep them damp and warm but not wet to get them to sprout.

    Garlic takes a long time to grow, same as leeks. They arent terribly hard, just take ages. Pumpkins are easy but take up a lot of room and really do not like to be moved so make sure if you plant them, they are in the spot u intend to keep them. Tomatoes need to be staked for support and cucumbers need to be tied to a trellis or similar frame to keep them off the ground. Potatoes can be grown in a hessian sack to make harvesting easier and you just need to plant potatoes that have been left too long and have started to sprout.

    I could go on and on. My mum is a green thumb and I cant go without my herbs for eating and healing. Trial and error, internet and books are your best sources of information. There are even books on companion planting (planting certain plants next to each other to help them grow better) which go into way more detail than I ever could. Best of luck! We just moved and I'm trying to get my vegie garden in soon, so far have only just managed my worm farm and a makeshift compost heap (piece of corragated tin with 4 stakes to curve up the sides and bits of wood to cap off the ends). Its fun to get in the garden!

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  6. #14
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    I'm still learning but started off with herbs. I've had parsley, basil, oregano, thyme and chives for a couple of years and it grows well. Last year I also did tomatoes and cos lettuce and both were a huge success, I used cherry tomatoes and had LOADS. I use pots for the herbs, lettuce and one lot of tomatoes, the other tomatoes and some of the basil I put in the ground. I just dug up the soil a bit and added compost and potting mix then watered with seasol. The main thing I think for me, is to remember to water every day. This year I'm trying Lebanese cucumber and watermelon too- fx it works!

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  8. #15
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    Default Wanna start a vegie patch!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Deserama View Post
    Thanks SPG

    Ok so any particular veg that are super easy? I take it by your post that cos lettuce is...what about things like garlic, onion, carrots?

    Do you know of anything that can be planted side by side that would ward of pests?
    I started veg gardening last year and massively expanded this year. We rent and have a huge front yard (useless bein the front lol) and a small back yard.

    In hanging pots on the verandah I grow heaps of cherry tomatoes of all kinds. I like the variety and you get a higher yield with cherry toms. Hanging pots are also a great way of avoiding snails.

    Potatoes in grow bags are really easy to grow! So are beans!

    Plant basil, chives, marigolds and nasturtium with everything! Avoid marigolds with beans though! These are all great companion plants that will help a little with pest issues.

    Don't be afraid to make mistakes!

    Google "square foot gardening".
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  9. #16
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    I am new to this too

    I usually grow and propagate my own succulent plants which are easy as they don't need a lot of maintenance lol but my husband who is an avid cook has been asking me to grow some herbs and veg for him for a while now so I have taken the plunge..

    I am just doing pots for now as we rent and I am unsure about placing anything on the ground which may kill the grass by the time (if we have to) move house..

    I have planted a small tomato vine (this type is only small and grows better in pots apparently), chili tree, sweet onion, chives, thyme, rosemary, lavender and oregano - though some of this died recently - a rep from bunnings said i probably didn't water it enough..

    Here I am thinking I don't want to over-water them (I'm so used to not watering every day with the succulents lol) and kill them off... so I started off by watering the plants a little each morning, though the heat is too much and after losing some of the oregano, I now water them in the morning and in the evening... also just for a few minutes during the day if I am home and it is exceptionally warm... so far so good...

    I recently had a big snail problem with my succulents though and had to put snail pallets down and so far so good.. I've only sighted a few since with a few days between..

    With a raised garden bed, does it have a base at all so you can move it now and then? Does it make it harder for snails to get into?

    At the moment I also have all my pots spread along the verandah, so they don't get direct sunlight, though the sun hits the ground about 30cm from where they are situated, is this okay?

    I've noticed some of the chilli's have small brown patches on the tips and am hoping it isn't from over-watering.. As I've planted it as a bit of a feature in with the spring onions, I've been watering it twice daily..

    Thanks for starting this thread! I've been looking for other novices to speak to lol

  10. #17
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    Toonzie and Tildy - with potatoes, can I just use a potato which has sprouted? Does the whole potato go in the soil and how do they grow from there? vine/plant ect Potatoes would really benefit in our garden!!

  11. #18
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    Yeah, plant sprouted potatoes. Its the easiest way. You can cut them up into quarters so long as there is an eye or a sprout in each quarter and plant the pieces. The plant grows above the ground as a shrubby type plant and the potatoes grow underneath the soil. Hence why bags are so awesome since you dont have to dig up the spuds, just unroll the bag or cut it open.

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  13. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by troopingfairy View Post
    I am new to this too


    I have planted a small tomato vine (this type is only small and grows better in pots apparently), chili tree, sweet onion, chives, thyme, rosemary, lavender and oregano - though some of this died recently - a rep from bunnings said i probably didn't water it enough..

    Here I am thinking I don't want to over-water them (I'm so used to not watering every day with the succulents lol) and kill them off... so I started off by watering the plants a little each morning, though the heat is too much and after losing some of the oregano, I now water them in the morning and in the evening... also just for a few minutes during the day if I am home and it is exceptionally warm... so far so good...


    With a raised garden bed, does it have a base at all so you can move it now and then? Does it make it harder for snails to get into?

    At the moment I also have all my pots spread along the verandah, so they don't get direct sunlight, though the sun hits the ground about 30cm from where they are situated, is this okay?

    I've noticed some of the chilli's have small brown patches on the tips and am hoping it isn't from over-watering.. As I've planted it as a bit of a feature in with the spring onions, I've been watering it twice daily..

    Thanks for starting this thread! I've been looking for other novices to speak to lol
    With herbs its best to remember that most of our culinary herbs have come from england, ireland, scotland and the like. So they are kinda used to shade and dampness. That being said, they dont want to be wet all the time. Damp yes, wet not so much. If you have trees in your garden they are best off under the trees. The only sun they need is early morning and late afternoon.

    Also, watering the leaves during the hottest part of the day can cause burns in any plant so if you water when its hot make sure it is only going onto the soil.

    Raised garden beds cannot be moved. Even if they did have a solid base (which most do not) they would be waaay too heavy to move anywhere. You can set one up on concrete that would be removable when you need to move house but that is about it. Much better to think of them as permenant structures and get permission from your landlord for it. The benefits of a raised bed are better drainage (which can maybe be a problem if it is really hot), easier access since you dont have to bend so far, and better soil as you have to fill it up so you are not relying on the existing soil.

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  15. #20
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    I started my vege patch yesterday and today the spinach is wilted and dead looking and my parsley has already been half eaten !! Arrgggh!

    I planted tomatoes , zuchini, capsicum, cabbage, leeks , celery , mint , spinach , silver beet and parsley .

    Was so exciting to do ! What can I do to protect my crop from being eaten as a seedling ??

    Thanks ladies!


 

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