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  1. #1
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    Default when in uniform do you represent your business? **kind of spinoff**

    Just a quick question..
    I work in a uniform at the airport, people see me as the company I work for, therefore, I have to be careful of what I say and do when in uniform.

    I have strict grooming and behaviour rules, while wearing the uniform..

    so my question is, can I have my own opinion while in uniform, or is it impossible to seperate?

    and does this extend to online, eg a mod is in uniform..

    Does wearing a uniform or representing them , mean that you should be more careful when giving opinions etc..

    I do not want to talk about anything specific in here.. just a general question...

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    Yes. I'm a public servant and rarely if ever comment on anything political online. Unless I am anon. I think if you wear a uniform or represent a coy online you have to be careful what you say and do.

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    beebs  (21-09-2012)

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    I think it's reasonable to expect that clients/customers as well as the general public will see you as representing that particular company or organisation, particularly if you are wearing an easily identifiable uniform or title.

    However whether that company or organisation expects you to act as their representative depends on the agreement between yourself and your employer.

    Some companies wont care about your personal views or opinions, provided you express them within the confines of the law.

    Other companies will expect you to moderate your opinions and behaviour to reflect their companies values, even beyond the workplace.

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    Mod-Myztik  (20-09-2012)

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    I think it does make a difference, but as for my personal opinion I make it clear it is my opinion only and considering my boss family are strong LNP supporters vocally and physically and I refuse to agree or make nice on it in or out of uniform.

    I will to a certain extent change my behaviour( I am a bit of a bogan lol) but for issues of importance not a chance.

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    In uniform you should definitely ensure your actions/behaviour are acceptable and uphold the standards of company.

    It's similar to school uniforms...if you see a group of kids running riot at the shops in their uniforms you'd think 'kids who go to xyz school are feral' whereas if they were out of uniform you'd just think 'those kids are feral'.

    I think if you are in uniform and representing the company (even if you're just popping into the shops after work) you need to be promoting their values/beliefs etc. Once your out of that uniform you can be whoever you damn well please.

    Also depends on your job though.....
    I'm a midwife and my personal opinion on something can be quite different to my professional opinion. When at work, I have to follow hospital/state policies when caring for women and for giving advice, otherwise I've got nothing to fall back on if it goes pear-shaped. When hanging out with my friends, I can whinge about how rubbish said policy is as much as I want. But even then I have to be careful to who I say that to, (especially if their pregnant) because they could then take a flippant remark as sound medical advice or worse pass it on to their friends as a blanket 'my best friend who's a midwife said thats a load of rubbish and you don't need to have continuous monitoring during labour' (for e.g) which could then have detrimental effects......

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    I thought the comment in the other thread, with regards to mods having a right to their opinion too etc..... was wrong!

    I think if mods want to join the discussion they should do it as a member just like everyone else... as in have a separate user account. For obvious reasons.

    More generally, when you're at work, be professional, objective and impersonal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Baracuda View Post
    I thought the comment in the other thread, with regards to mods having a right to their opinion too etc..... was wrong!I think if mods want to join the discussion they should do it as a member just like everyone else... as in have a separate user account. For obvious reasons. More generally, when you're at work, be professional, objective and impersonal.
    Disagreeing with that, but there should be a very clear difference that's obvious to everyone if it's a mod post or a personal post. Back to the topic - working in a govt dept I often had people ask what I thought of certain procedures or laws. I would just say that my personal opinion was irrelevant as it didn't change a thing about the situation. Among coworkers though it was pretty common to find us on a break talking about how stupid this procedure or that guideline was.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Baracuda View Post
    I thought the comment in the other thread, with regards to mods having a right to their opinion too etc..... was wrong!

    I think if mods want to join the discussion they should do it as a member just like everyone else... as in have a separate user account. For obvious reasons.

    More generally, when you're at work, be professional, objective and impersonal.
    But obviously the bubhub employee/moderator/whatever policy must say different or they would not be allowed to do it. Provided the moderators dont ban or censor someone based purely on a response to their [the moderators] personal opinion then my guess is they're operating within hubbubs requirements.

    As I said in my earlier post, every company or organisation will have different policies on expressions of personal opinions.

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    I believe so. In uniform. Moderators on websites (though I've heard on some sites moderators having two user names. So they have "moderator" role and then I suppose they can still take off their uniform so to speak) Though I enjoy when drivers do dangerous or stupid things in a clearly marked work vehicle. Yes I'm a dobber

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boobycino View Post
    I believe so. In uniform. Moderators on websites (though I've heard on some sites moderators having two user names. So they have "moderator" role and then I suppose they can still take off their uniform so to speak) Though I enjoy when drivers do dangerous or stupid things in a clearly marked work vehicle. Yes I'm a dobber
    I have to admit im a bit of a dangerous driver dinner too. Probably not so much dangerous driving as throwing rubbish or cigarette butts out of vehicle windows. Or tailgating.I hate being tailgated and if you're stupid enough to do it in your branded work vehicle then you've got it coming!


 
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