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  1. #1
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    Default Control crying 'no risk to babies' 'better for mothers mental health' says new melbou

    rne study.

    What do you think?

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-09-1...babies/4254446

    "A landmark study by Melbourne researchers has found controlled crying poses no long-term risk to the health of babies and infants.

    The study, conducted by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, looked at the effects of early behavioural parenting techniques on a group of six-year-olds.

    The institute's Dr Anna Price says it found controlled crying, where parents leave tired children by themselves for short periods at a time, was beneficial for children and parents alike.

    Have you found controlled crying beneficial? See what our audience had to say.
    "A brief sleep program offered to parents who wanted help managing their baby's sleep could improve baby's sleep, could improve mum's sleep and her mental health," she said.

    Dr Price says the techniques work and they are safe to use.

    "There were no differences between families who were and were not offered the program across a whole range of things; children's mental health, their behaviour, their stress levels, parents' mental health and sleep," she said.

    We did it for all four of our kids. They're healthy and happy and slept through the night from pretty early on. Stoked!

    Darren Chapman via Twitter
    She says if it does not work after a week, parents may need extra help to get the technique right.

    For those who do not like to leave their children to cry, Dr Price suggests an alternative called camping out.

    "It involves the parent sitting in a chair next to their cot or lying in a camp bed and slowly moving the chair or cot out of the room over two to three weeks," she said.

    "It takes longer. Controlled comforting takes only a few days, but camping out for parents who find it too hard listening to their baby cry is a great option."

  2. #2
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    The techniques are not controlled crying.. The ABC has reported this incorrectly. I find this damaging to the actual research for them to report it like this. Dr Anna Price specifically discusses the difference between her research and it not being 'controlled crying'.

    Here is a link to the report from the Murdoch Institute:

    http://www.mcri.edu.au/news/2012/sep...er-babies.aspx
    Last edited by babyla; 11-09-2012 at 21:00.

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Default Control crying 'no risk to babies' 'better for mothers mental health' says new melbou

    I was going to post this myself!

    I think the more studies that are done into controlled crying the better. It is an endless source of guilt, judgement, controversy and different opinions. Just look at the threads that get started on here.

    The more information we have - good or bad - the better.

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to duckduckgoose For This Useful Post:

    Alexander Beetle  (11-09-2012),babyla  (11-09-2012),Cdro  (11-09-2012)

  6. #5
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    Well, that is what we did, and I was told it was controlled crying, going in every two minutes and then spacing it out longer.

    I would wager that lots of people think that is what they are doing when in fact they are control comforting.

    But I would still guess that the anti control criers hate it no matter which one you do, or what it is called.

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    babyla  (11-09-2012)

  8. #6
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    I know, I felt so guilty for doing it after reading some of the stuff on here, even though it worked really well for our family - and I was just following advice that I was given by our nanny at the time.

    So I am really relieved to read this study to be honest, It feels like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders a bit.

    Quote Originally Posted by duckduckgoose View Post
    I was going to post this myself!

    I think the more studies that are done into controlled crying the better. It is an endless source of guilt, judgement, controversy and different opinions. Just look at the threads that get started on here.

    The more information we have - good or bad - the better.

  9. #7
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    I'm also glad some research has been done! Personally, we did something like this which worked very well. My gut always told me this was not damaging to my DS. I also feel like a weight has been lifted. A weight which should not have been there in the first place.

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    beebs  (11-09-2012)

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    Default Control crying 'no risk to babies' 'better for mothers mental health' says new melbou

    I don't know if it was damaging to DD or not, but it was damaging to me. I didn't mind getting up 1000 times during the night, but hearing her cry and not going to her made me a mess. I cried and I felt so stressed out. I quickly realised it wasn't for me and went back to cuddling her to sleep.

    This isn't having a go at those who did. I'm just saying it wasn't "better for mum" in this case.

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    I used controlled crying with DD without actually realising that it was a "thing", let alone a "thing" that is as contentious as bottle-feeding! It was simply the only way to get some sanity with a bub who screamed frequently and did not settle. I really struggled with my first, she had reflux and was a reasonably challenging baby, I am one of those people who has a hard time asking for help, and this is not a good trait with a baby like that!
    DS is seemingly the opposite to DD in every way- people often remark that they rarely hear him cry, and I have had very few problems with putting him to sleep. I would not even consider "controlled crying" with him, simply because he does not need it.
    I don't think my choices for either child has damaged them. I have just done what I felt needed to be done for both. Even babies have different personalities and respond to their surroundings in different ways. To this day, DD has a "naughty streak" (like her mummy!), and is pretty highly strung, and DS is relaxed and laid back (like his dad).

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    Default Control crying 'no risk to babies' 'better for mothers mental health' says new melbou

    I think its good. Brings some balance to the discussion. My daughter is 15 months old. She has woken 6-12 times a night since almost the beginning. I got to a point where I was fu king exhausted. Around 9 months. I was physically unwell and not able to even sleep if she was asleep becsuse I was so used to sleep deprivation. I remember hating all parents who recommended gentle methods. I had done it ALL. Read pinky McKay and Dr sears. Breastfed on demand to ensure she was full. Cluster fed so she was more than full. Fed on only one side so she got more fatty milk.. co slept, Lots of skin to skin and a loving gentle routine with lavender oils and massage and soft music!!!
    Eventually it was taken out of my hands and she had to be nightweaned as my bedtime anxiety required medication LOL. Seriously. She was taught to self soothe by her daddy while I got some sleep elsewhere. It didn't work anyway though hahaha she can self soothe now but she can also still wake up screaming all night :what: I always get that pang of guilt now when I read someone on facebook saying controlled crying causes brain damage or later psychological damage..
    I can accept that controlled crying causes infants stress but I've always wondered if its one of those things people hate on a bit too passionately.
    Sent from my HTC Desire S using BubHub

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