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  1. #1
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    Default Do you encourage your child/ren to think critically about issues in the world?

    Do you encourage rational and critical thought in your house?

    If so, why and how?

    If not, ( and I assume the opposite of 'encouraging' would in this case be 'discouraging') - so , why and how?


    This would be in relation to the many subjects we face often debate with firm viewpoints as adults, that we know as participating people of a society our children will also face.




    a few definitions of critical thinking:
    "Critical thinking, in its broadest sense has been described as "purposeful reflective judgment concerning what to believe or what to do."

    "The disciplined ability and willingness to assess evidence and claims, to seek a breadth of contradicting as well as confirming information, to make objective judgments on the basis of well supported reasons as a guide to belief and action, and to monitor ones thinking while doing so."

    "Ability to make a judgment, consider merit or worth, accuracy, relevance, and logic. It involves analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Other aspects of critical thinking can include metacognition, problem-framing and resolving."



    Examples welcome

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    headoverfeet's Avatar
    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Default Do you encourage your child/ren to think critically about issues in the world?

    Erhm I think so?

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    Absolutely. I would think I had failed as a parent if I did not foster and encourage critical thinking in my children. The result of not doing so leads to ignorance and narrow-mindedness, of which the world has enough already.

    My son is only three, but is very inquisitive and I definitely encourage him to think about bigger picture issues in an age appropriate way.

    We have close ties to several same sex partnered parents, and he asked me the other day 'Why don't I have two Mummies?', this led on to a discussion about the differences between families and how there is no 'right' make-up of a family.

    Editted to say...
    I guess I didn't really touch on how I encourage the critical side... I think that will develop more as he ages and is able to understand life issues more. Had he asked me the same questions in a few years time, I think I would encourage him to think about what makes a 'family' and how these can take different forms etc..
    Last edited by Barnaby; 07-09-2012 at 15:44.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FiveInTheBed View Post
    Do you encourage rational and critical thought in your house?

    If so, why and how?

    If not, ( and I assume the opposite of 'encouraging' would in this case be 'discouraging') - so , why and how?


    This would be in relation to the many subjects we face often debate with firm viewpoints as adults, that we know as participating people of a society our children will also face.




    a few definitions of critical thinking:
    "Critical thinking, in its broadest sense has been described as "purposeful reflective judgment concerning what to believe or what to do."

    "The disciplined ability and willingness to assess evidence and claims, to seek a breadth of contradicting as well as confirming information, to make objective judgments on the basis of well supported reasons as a guide to belief and action, and to monitor ones thinking while doing so."

    "Ability to make a judgment, consider merit or worth, accuracy, relevance, and logic. It involves analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Other aspects of critical thinking can include metacognition, problem-framing and resolving."



    Examples welcome
    I don't know that a lot of adults do this very well let alone kids. Mine are probably too young at this stage, but we do encourage DD1 where it's appropriate. She worries easily and tends to dwell so we're careful about what we expose her to.

    I hope we do as our kids get older. My parents certainly did and I loved our dinner table conversations. My mother was my idol she worked with indigenous families and orphans when we lived in north Qld, and then was one of the first people to work with AIDS sufferers in Australia. She made us all rethink how we saw those less privileged or "different" from us, which wasn't easy in the 80s in Qld.
    Last edited by Sonja; 07-09-2012 at 18:46.

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    Default Re: Do you encourage your child/ren to think critically about issues in the world?

    Not yet, he's 2.


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    Yes, I encourage both my kids to apply critical thinking

    For example there's a new show on tv and it was being heavily advertisised. One scene in the advert showed a cheerleader whose top burst open and all the guys cheered. DD absent mindedly cheered as well. So we had a long talk about what she was cheering about, how did she think the girl would feel, what else might have happened - ie someone filming it in their phone, what would all the kids say at school the next day, what if someone put it on the Internet, did she think the girl would want to do cheerleading again. Dd decided that she wouldn't laugh at that scene or if it happened in real life and that she didn't want to watch that show when the humor was based on someone being ridiculed.

    I 'lead' the conversation by asking questions and almost being devils advocate. Both kids now often question what they see and do not accept all things on face value.

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    Default Do you encourage your child/ren to think critically about issues in the world?

    We try... But DD is very black and white. It's why she is not allowed to go to RE. If she learnt that stuff in school, by an adult, she would believe it. She believes school is a place of learning and everything taught there is fact. Like I said, black and white.

    Encouraging her to think critically is an almost impossible task at this point... But we do try. Lol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SassyMummy View Post
    We try... But DD is very black and white. It's why she is not allowed to go to RE. If she learnt that stuff in school, by an adult, she would believe it. She believes school is a place of learning and everything taught there is fact. Like I said, black and white.

    Encouraging her to think critically is an almost impossible task at this point... But we do try. Lol.
    This really takes me back. I still remember thinking everything they told you at school must be true. It's actually a nice little stage kids go through where they ae so trusting and believing (not all kids do this I agree). Experience teaches them quickly enough that teachers don't know everything, but it's nice while it lasts.

    I agree with WCM about getting kids to critically evaluate things from how the other person might feel. DD1 is deeply empathetic (almost too empathetic at times) but it's an excellent way to drive critical thought.

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    Witwicky is offline A closed mouth gathers no foot.
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    My eldest is only three, but I don't think there is an age that is too young to encourage critical thinking

    I always ask him what HE thinks, as opposed to automatically giving an answer.

    We encourage him to form his own opinions of things - recently during a car trip, he asked me what the people outside the big house were doing (it was a Church and there were people outside talking after the service), which lead to a discussion about church, god, religious beliefs etc (in a very age appropriate manner...sounds extreme, it really wasn't). But he asked, so we had the discussion and it resulted in him really thinking about it and how some people believe in gods etc (I think his final comment included dinosaurs He is little, but his understanding of concepts is phenomenal and I enjoy encouraging him to think critically .

    At the moment, a lot of his answers are quite elaborate (his imagination is pretty full on but I will always encourage him to think for himself and think critically, and it will serve him well in his lifetime.
    Last edited by Witwicky; 07-09-2012 at 21:30.

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    I think when they start asking questions is a perfect time to start.

    I quite often ask my lot 'what do you think?' - give them as much information I personally have on the subject, find any books/ask them to borrow books on their next library day, or do the good ol' "let's google it'.

    I'm sure it will become more in depth once they grow.


 

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