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  1. #1
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    Default Medicine as a Mature Aged Student

    I was just wanting an opinion. I'm 19 currently and pregnant with bub1, but want to study after the birth. I was considering doing nursing to become a div 2, then once I am 21 applying to do medicine as a mature aged student, perhaps part time.
    I'm worried I'll be too old and that I may stuggle to balance this with family life, but I also would love my bub/s to be proud of their mum in a future.
    But do hubbers think this is a bad idea? Should I just become a fully qualified div 1 nurse instead?
    Have any hubbers done this or similar?

  2. #2
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    Can you study medicine part time? I had thought it was only fulltime. When you say medicine do you mean MBBS?

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    Default Medicine as a Mature Aged Student

    Hi!

    I know heaps of people that did medicine as mature age students, I dont think you'd be too old at all!!

    medicine is a HUGE commitment so just do heaps and heaps of research into it. Where my DH went to med school the students were divided up for placement for the last two years and had to move towns if allocated to do so. Once you've got your degree there's still years and years of training. DH started med school in 2000 and has only just completed his training as a specialist this year and that's with him having happened to select one of the quickest specialties and with him completing all his assessment in the earliest possible timeframe. Many specialties require rural placements or moving to get a job.

    There's plenty of strong women out there who balance medicine and family. Just make sure you've got heaps of support to help you through!!

    Best of luck deciding!!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by wigglemay View Post
    I was just wanting an opinion. I'm 19 currently and pregnant with bub1, but want to study after the birth. I was considering doing nursing to become a div 2, then once I am 21 applying to do medicine as a mature aged student, perhaps part time.
    I'm worried I'll be too old and that I may stuggle to balance this with family life, but I also would love my bub/s to be proud of their mum in a future.
    But do hubbers think this is a bad idea? Should I just become a fully qualified div 1 nurse instead?
    Have any hubbers done this or similar?
    Whoooaa. Hold up. Have you researched medicine at all?

    First of all its a fulltime program, as far as I know there is no part-time study options.

    Secondly you have two choices of programs that you can in Australia - undergraduate (5-6 years dependent on university) and postgraduate (4 years, after you've completed an undergraduate degree).

    What program are you looking at?

    Postgraduate programs, people will be at least 21 in them as they would already have to have completed an undergrad degree.

    Undergraduate programs, you will still need to sit the UMAT and have a very competitive score as well a competitive uni entry score (OP 1/99 ATAR) to be considered for entry. This course would have majority of school leavers but at 21 you wouldn't be 'old' at all.

    After you've completed med school (which is brutal in terms of workload/stress) you then have many further years of training as previous posters have said.

    Lots of people study/work as doctors with young families and theres no reason why you can't.

    But I suggest you research it thoroughly, as you sound a bit unsure especially since you said you were going to do enrolled nursing and then medicine or maybe registered nurse. Without being offensive, those three are completely different in terms of academia.

  5. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to wannawannabe For This Useful Post:

    Alexander Beetle  (05-09-2012),CMF  (05-09-2012),Glover  (05-09-2012),Gracie's Mum  (05-09-2012)

  6. #5
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    Hi there,

    I am currently studying MBBS as part of a post grad course.. I am 24 and am in my second year (of 4). There is a mix of ages in my course, but 21 definitely isn't old by any standard...

    Medicine isn't available to do part time, it is a full on course with a lot of contact hours, especially in 3rd and 4th year where you are basically working/studying in the hospital for the equivalent of full time hours. If you are serious about it, I would suggest looking into the GAMSAT if you do nursing first, or UMAT if you want to go straight into it (as a undergrad 6 year course). Each uni has different entry requirements, and are quite competitive academically, so it depends what state you are in and whether you are willing to move to do it.

    I know there are some people with families in my course, and while they are a minority, they manage and love it.

    There is the possibility of being sent away on different rotations to different areas, however, it is sometimes possible to apply for special consideration if you have dependent children. Again, depends on the uni and your circumstances.

    I'd just like to point out that while yes, it does take years and years after your degree to become a specialist, and that does involve training and more exams and alot of hard work and hours, you are still getting paid and you are working. While it is a long path, I think of it as very similar to say, a career in business. You don't become the CEO of a company the day after graduation. You have to work your way up through the ranks...

    That being said, if you are already in the course, it is possible to defer or take time off for a limited period of time depending on what stage of your degree you are at for things like childbirth and sickness (then of course it takes longer to complete the degree, but you do have some flexibility). DH and I are TTC #1 and so I will more than likely be deferring for a period of time for the birth and first couple of months of bubs life. I'm very lucky to have a DH that is amazingly supportive in all aspects.

    If Medicine is what you want to do, then I would encourage you to do it. However, make sure you do your research and have a strong support network around you, because its not easy. That being said, I wouldn't change it for the world.
    Last edited by onlyjuststarting; 05-09-2012 at 17:11.

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  8. #6
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    I agree with everyone else who said 21 would not be old at all. Check out the Paging Dr forums (med student forums) for some perspective on that. I have a family member who did her MBBS a few years ago, and there were a huge range of ages there. In fact, I would argue that in many cases (not all! Don't flame me people!) a little bit of life experience other than just school then straight on to uni goes a long way toward making a good doctor.

    I looked into doing med quite seriously a few years back. I am now planning to start nursing/midwifery next year instead. A few of the considerations that turned me off the MBBS path:

    * It is full time, and it is really full on. Everybody is different, but for me personally, I value my time with my family too much to go to med school. If I'd realised before kids came along, of course the story could be totally different.
    * It takes a long time. Graduating is just the start. You have lots of post-grad work and study ahead of you. I calculated that even if I had started at 27, I would have been well into my forties before I finished specialising and got where I wanted (and that's if I had been able to go straight into the specialty I wanted -- it is not as easy as you'd think, and the "med student tsunami" means places are getting more difficult to secure in many areas).
    * You asked about the difference between nursing and medicine - others may feel free to disagree with me, but from what I've observed, medicine has less patient contact (although still a high degree of it), and is more focussed on the "why?". ie: Diagnosis, formulating a plan for treatment, following up on how the treatment is working etc. I have been told medicine generally suits those with a strongly scientific/inquiring mind. Nursing has more patient contact, and is more task-oriented than many medical specialities. Ok, they were major generalisations, but this is what I have observed from doing a lot of research and talking to a LOT of people over several years. I'd suggest you do a similar thing.
    * If you decide you seriously want to pursue med, be aware that most (all?) unis use both the UMAT/GAMSAT plus interview. They like to see evidence that you are serious about the field you are entering, which I have been told includes demonstrating relevant voluntary/community experience. Acquiring some of that whilst doing some basic A&P/chem/biol units might be a good way to spend some time in the years ahead.

    Good luck with your research and with whichever future path you take.

    onlyjuststarting, I am so full of admiration for people who manage to combine med school with a young family! You go girl

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Parksider For This Useful Post:

    onlyjuststarting  (23-09-2012)


 

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