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  1. #11
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    Default Why is induction so bad?

    If you need it done you cannot avoid the inevitable .
    The argument for induction is that even tho people suggest the need for intervention is greater after induction , there is always that possibility of need for intervention , no matter how you go into labour .
    I've heard lovely birth stories from friends and family involving induction & intervention.
    Unfortunately people's opinions are everywhere and you cannot avoid them :-/
    Personally I had a strong & fast labour after an induction with ventouse and episiotomy, however I don't regret a thing and am over joyed with my labour and birth and my baby girl
    Every labour and birth is individual , have a super midwife & have an even better experience , all the best for you

  2. #12
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    Default Why is induction so bad?

    It's NOT ... People just have their own thought and beliefs about everything and this is one of them ....
    I have had 4 and I had NO problems at all loved it would do it the same way if given the chance....
    .....

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  4. #13
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    Default Why is induction so bad?

    I think the aversion to induction comes from the fact it's associated with more pain closer together- however there's never any guarantee on how a natural labour will go.

    If its it's what's best for you then don't worry about it.
    Main thing don't stress yourself out about it take it as it comes.

    On the plus side induced births are usually over faster!

    Good luck!

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  6. #14
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    Whilst many women say they had positive experience during an induction I think there's probably more that say it wasn't so positive. My first born (DS) was induced and my second (DD) was spontaneous. With DS I was crying out for an epi within an hour of the syntocin drip as the contractions were unbearable. With DD I had an active labour, mostly at home, and cruised through the contractions with the majority of it being very bearable. Because I had the epi with DS I was on my back for the duration which is the worst position for labour and birth (baby has to push uphill). Induction can also put stress on your baby and body (remembering your body was not ready to give birth). Induction for first time mothers also has a 30.4% emergency CS rate, 24.6% instrument delivery (ie forceps or ventouse) which can be traumatic for baby and mother and increase risk of tearing with only a 44.9% chance of having a vaginal delivery.
    http://www.smh.com.au/national/steep...715-1hhtp.html
    DS was 40+16 when he was induced, turns out he was fine and the placenta was fine. DD was born 40+10 and again was fine, placenta was fine.

    I should also add that the cocktail of drugs given for induction and epi can also adversely affect breastmilk production.

    Have your health care providers talked to you about the risks of induction? They are often keen to talk about the risks of being 'overdue' but aren't so vocal about the risks of induction. I would strongly suggest talking to your health care provider about the risks and options available to you. When I started to get induction pushed on me with DD I offered to do regular monitoring instead of induction as I was keen not to have a repeat experience.

    Best of luck with everything

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  8. #15
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Default Why is induction so bad?

    The cascade of intervention!

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  10. #16
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    Default Why is induction so bad?

    For me both times it was so intense and painful and I didn't like that i had to be hooked up to machines etc. My friend has had three by choice and never had issues or any pain relief so we both had very different births/pain thresholds

  11. #17
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    I had 3, 2 were great easy births not even very painful, My 3rd was horrid but that was because he was my 6th bub and I had a bad reaction to the induction drug cervidil.

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    Default Why is induction so bad?

    Natural spontaneous labour progresses and the pain gets worse and worse over time. Once the drip goes in the intensity of labour is full on straight away. That's the way I understand it. Don't be freaked out by all the intervention stuff though. I was totally fine and had a normal vaginal birth with a totally healthy baby. I know it can lead to more intervention and Caesarian but most of the time it's totally fine. Don't stress about it.

  13. #19
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    Im going to be in the minority im sure, but i loved my induction. 37+3 i had my baby 3 hours after my waters were broken and the drip was put in pitocin or whatever it is. Only half that time i was labouring, other than monitoring i had no intervention and i found the pain easier to cope with than my first which was spontaneous labour

  14. #20
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    I love this quote from Hannah Dahlen (Associate Professor of Midwifery, University of Western Sydney) as I think it give a great example of the cascade of intervention.
    "If you’re a low risk woman, healthy pregnancy, you walk into the doors of our institutions what you do is you embark on a cascade that often takes you in a direction you never anticipated. You arrive, the midwife puts you on a bed, she puts a monitor on your belly, she examines you, she takes your blood pressure, she finds something going on in the monitor, there’s a deviation on the trace, so the monitor never comes off and now you’re really uncomfortable because you’re on the bed. You need pain relief, you’re going to have an epidural, now you’re going to need a drip, now you’re going to need a catheter, now you are never ever going to get off that monitor. Ok, we progress, your labour slows down, now you need oxytocin [syntocin], now you get to second stage, guess what, you can’t push because you can’t feel. So now we get the forceps out, now we cut the episiotomy. Suddenly you’ve got a baby in your arms and yes, you’re alive and the baby’s alive but has that been a good experience and did it need to happen that way?"

    (Quote taken from The Face of Birth documentary)

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