+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11
    Eko's Avatar
    Eko is offline Acrobatic Dominatrix.
    Winner 2012 - Most Politically Correct Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    2,837
    Thanks
    1,083
    Thanked
    1,427
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I don't know about teaching children when they're very young, but I do know that when I was in early highschool I was studying Japanese and Indonesian at the same time.
    In an English class, I wrote a 2000 word essay in Hiragana, using Indonesian language. The teacher thought I was taking the mickey and yelled at me for it. Then she took it to my Japanese teacher who translated it to Indonesian, and the Indonesian teacher who translated it to English.
    I got a B for that essay at the end of it. I think the English teacher saw the funny side by the end of it when she realised I hadn't done it intentionally.

    My point is that if a teenager with a pretty good grasp of language can have their brain broken enough to make a mistake that big and not notice it while they're doing it, I'm sure a toddler would have just as much if not MORE trouble! So I wouldn't be suprised if it took a trilingual child longer to speak.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Eko For This Useful Post:

    lovesushi  (31-08-2012)

  3. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    795
    Thanks
    900
    Thanked
    233
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Re: Raising a trilingual child

    Thank you for all the helpful replies.

    I normally see children in my community that understand their parents language but only speak/respond in English. It's important to me that DS speaks my language because my family do not know English. My inlaw family is fluent in English so my husband doesn't take it serious like me.

    I'm not sure if linguistic (sp?) ability is genetic, if it is then we have "bad" gene. I've only learnt English but after many years still have heavy funny accent and very limited vocabulary. My husband speaks English well but is terrible in spelling. We've been together for nearly 5 years but only learnt very little from the other's language. I really hope that my son is much better than us in that aspect.
    Last edited by lovesushi; 31-08-2012 at 17:30.

  4. #13
    rainbow road's Avatar
    rainbow road is online now look at the stars, look how they shine for you
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    in a glass case of emotion
    Posts
    12,409
    Thanks
    1,187
    Thanked
    8,058
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts

    Default Raising a trilingual child

    Children before 11 have a much greater capacity to learn languages than people over 11

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to rainbow road For This Useful Post:

    lovesushi  (01-09-2012)

  6. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    'Stralia
    Posts
    947
    Thanks
    386
    Thanked
    95
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Raising a trilingual child

    My nephew is being brought up bilingual and at 4 years old was very far behind, though I'm not sure if that could just be him. I do know a lot of children brought up bilingual so I think if you sort of speak all three to them it's a bit like translating and they'll pick it up easier than bits and pieces of three languages?

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to backgroundnoise For This Useful Post:

    lovesushi  (01-09-2012)

  8. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    795
    Thanks
    900
    Thanked
    233
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Re: Raising a trilingual child

    Quote Originally Posted by backgroundnoise View Post
    My nephew is being brought up bilingual and at 4 years old was very far behind, though I'm not sure if that could just be him. I do know a lot of children brought up bilingual so I think if you sort of speak all three to them it's a bit like translating and they'll pick it up easier than bits and pieces of three languages?
    Was he behind both languages or just 1?

  9. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    'Stralia
    Posts
    947
    Thanks
    386
    Thanked
    95
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Raising a trilingual child

    Quote Originally Posted by lovesushi View Post
    Was he behind both languages or just 1?
    In both, his English was that of a two year old and his Greek was very limited. He's picking up English a lot better now that he's in prep though

  10. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    35
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked
    1
    Reviews
    0
    Grandparents can help. My parents can only speak our dialect and mandarin. They live with my brother to help with his kids. My brother's first child picks up mandarin very easily. She somehow figures out nana and pa can not understand English that well so she has to speak Mandarin to them.

    A few of my cousins grow up in Europe but we are very surprised at their mandarin. Their parents only speak our dialect at home. How can they learn mandarin? We later find that they watch quite a lot of TV in Mandarin. They learn from these shows (mainly dramas). Their parents take them to China every frequently. They find that what they learned from TV is useful in making them popular among mandarin speakers, which encourages them to learn more.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to ChristinaM For This Useful Post:

    lovesushi  (03-09-2012)

  12. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,862
    Thanks
    164
    Thanked
    497
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Raising a trilingual child

    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    From a linguistics perspective... kids who are raised bilingual/multilingual usually do take a little longer to become fluent in each language, but their proficiency by school age is easily as good as their peers. Being multilingual also has so many benefits that you really shouldn't let any potential language "delay" worry you.

    Interestingly, the most effective way of ensuring a child learns two languages fluently is to have one parent speak to the child exclusively in one language, and the other parent in the other language. When it comes to 3 languages in the home though, that's a tricky one. All I can suggest is to ensure that your son is exposed as much as possible to all three languages. Try to make sure that one language isn't reserved for one use... eg. that games are played in all languages, songs sung, books read etc. With plenty of meaningful exposure, kids will usually pick up (and then learn to distinguish) whatever languages they're exposed to.
    This is exactly how I understand it too. We are bilingual and we didn't follow these rules (of the fluent/mother tongue parent speaking their language solely). We spoke a true random mix. Our DD didn't realise for many years that she was speaking two languages which can be confusing for others but not for her. Our DS we compartmentalised languages, but also moved back to Australia so he was exposed to way more English than our DD.

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Hannahly For This Useful Post:

    lovesushi  (03-09-2012)

  14. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,403
    Thanks
    93
    Thanked
    387
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Raising a trilingual child

    My parents speak Italian I grew up in a French colony and I went to an English school. It wasn't confusing as a child I just knew Italian at home French at the shops and outside, English at school... Kids are like sponges I could converse in 3 languages at the same time...
    DD is 5 months now and she'll need to learn a few as we are blended cultures here so we'll get the grandparents to spend time with her talking the different languages, I will speak Italian when DH is not around we'll also have sit down lessons daily to learn writing and grammar when she's older, holiday with the relatives too so she can practice. :-)

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to ciaomamma For This Useful Post:

    lovesushi  (03-09-2012)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Raising Boys
    By Kiplusthree in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 11-11-2012, 11:48
  2. 1,2,3 Magic/Raising Your Spirited Child etc worth the $$?
    By breakthemould in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 29-06-2012, 20:46

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Einsteinz Music
Make music at Einsteinz Music in age-appropriate class in Sydney's Inner West, Eastern Suburbs or North Shore. For ages 6 mths - 4 yrs. All music is live! Christmas Gift certificates available for full term or casual classes. Call 0431 338 143
sales & new stuffsee all
CarmelsBeautySecrets
Growing your own natural nails is easy. Years ago, I devised a simple and very effective technique which really helps boosts the nails' growth in as little as three days! And most importantly keeps them that way.
featured supporter
The Fix Program Sydney CBD and Broadway
Pregnancy and women's health physio, pregnancy and new mum Pilates classes taught by our physios for you and bub. Pregnancy back and pelvic pain. Also, we treat postnatal and women of all ages. Incontinence, prolapse, sexual and pelvic pain.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!