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  1. #11
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    ToughLove is offline Meaner than a junkyard dog
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    Sure, why not.

    DD is five and her bedtime story at the moment is Tom Sawyer. Trust me, there are some parts that need a bit of glossing over {such as the reference to watermelons being "ni**er fruit" } , but the adult theme is left.
    We've read Narnia and some Kipling as well, and those are a bit more grown-up.

    I remember reading Flowers in the Attic when I was 11.

    There's nothing wrong with adult books {not THAT type of adult book} for younger kids. Better than the pre-teen trash that's on the shelves at the moment.

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    No. I think 10 is too young to read Lord of The Flies.

    I feel that a 10 year old child would need to be very mature enough to deconstruct and process the themes.

    I also don't know that this is necessary for a 10 year old. There are plenty of other books with more age appropriate themes.

    Would I be happy with my 10 year old watching the movie - no. So, I am definitely not comfortable with them reading it either.

    ETA: It was written for an adult audience.
    Last edited by babyla; 28-08-2012 at 19:15.

  3. #13
    Bonkers is offline wishes she was a glow worm. A glow worm's never glum, 'cos how can you be grumpy when the sun shines out of your bum?
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    Default Would you let your child aged 10 read

    I'm pretty sure I watched the movie in primary school (I think I vaguely remember)

  4. #14
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    Gothel is offline Skip the drama, stay with Mama!
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    Default Re: Would you let your child aged 10 read

    No I don't think so. it's a pretty full on book, they descend into madness slowly but it's gripping and disturbing, all the more so cos it's kids. It's years since I have read it but I remember it vividly. I think I would hold that one back for a few years personally

    **Nothing spells as goof as typo splats**

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    Default Would you let your child aged 10 read

    I would. DSD aged 10 read all the hunger games. I'd rather she read something with a bit more substance.

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    It would depend on the individual child.

    Some kids are more than capable of being able to handle that sort of thing. I was when I was a kid... my parents were strict EXCEPT about censoring things from me, so I was exposed to a lot when I was a kid. I remember starting to read Lord of the Flies when I was a pre-teen/young teen, but I got bored and gave up.

    I have an only child, and as cliche as it sounds, she's a bit grown up because she spends a lot of time around adults rather than children. I am a no-bull parent and if she asks me a question, I answer it as best I can in a way she will understand. She knows about all sorts of things other parents would never dream of telling their kids about.

    We've talked about things like cannibalism, for example. I did that in a car trip, where I just said something without thinking, and she wanted more info. So began my attempt to explain cannibalism to a 7-year-old while I was driving. lol.

    She's all very factual and doesn't get terribly emotional about things that don't involve her or people she loves, so I really think that by 10, she'd probably be more than able to accept the themes of Lord of the Flies. That said, I'm not sure she'd be terribly interested, as she seems to be more interested in pretty cartoons than tales of substance.

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    I haven't read it, but my dh has. He said 'it's more like what age would you inflict it on someone?' - he's a big reader, but he did not find the book that riveting. His answer by the way was year 8 or 9. Definitely not a 10yo.

    It can be hard to find suitable books for good readers, but there are definitely better options around.

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    Default Re: Would you let your child aged 10 read

    I haven't read it, it's really not my style though I've been contemplating it after a friend read it a few months ago.

    My child would have to be very mature for a 10yr old to read such things, but in saying that like PPs, I was reading advanced books like pride and prejudice, Jean Plaidy and the entire series of Anne Rice's vampire chronicles. Actually I'm pretty sure by 11-12 I had read most every, if not all vampire related book in the local library. Anne rice started a now 16 year long love of all written things fang (....well most..... )

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    Absolutely.
    I'd be very hesitant to restrict a child's reading - regardless of the age or content.
    I was an avid reader as a child, and my parents never placed any restrictions on what I read. I read plenty of books with quite "adult" themes when young, and generally if I wasn't mature enough for the content then I simply didn't understand the themes... and if I was then I had my own thoughtful take on them.

    If I was aware that a book had content or themes that I thought my child might not be mature enough for, then I'd probably make a point of discussing it with them.

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    yep. we'd prob read it together and talk over any stiuff he wanted to as we went.


 

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