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    Quote Originally Posted by Isabellabean View Post
    I remember when I was at uni studying law a female tutor I had actually made a point to tell us ladies how hard being a lawyer would be for us to even get jobs (said law was still a 'boys club') let alone be taken seriously and basically told us if we wanted children be prepared to never ever see them or pick a different career path
    How would she know if she is a uni tutor? Unless she returned to study after starting a career as a lawyer? It is a well-established fact that the majority of graduate lawyer jobs go to females. In my graduate year in a high-profile law firm there were 9 females and 6 males. Eight years on and most of us are still lawyers, and most of us have children. The difference is, the males who have children are generally now more senior and have higher salaries, and not just because of maternity leave - I had one year of maternity leave and I am more than one year behind some of them.

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    Default The real reason why more women don’t rise to the top of companies

    She could have been working as a casual tutor while also working at a firm? Most universities use casual tutors from the profession at some stage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NancyBlackett View Post
    She could have been working as a casual tutor while also working at a firm? Most universities use casual tutors from the profession at some stage.
    That's interesting, all of mine were later year students. Anyway, I can think of a few firms where her experience might have come from. Thankfully they're not all like that!

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    Default The real reason why more women don’t rise to the top of companies

    Too many still are though - it's disappointing.

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    Default The real reason why more women don’t rise to the top of companies

    I am currently working casual in my industry and applying for part time jobs that are way below my skill level. Unfortunately I can't be a director without working 40 plus hours from an office a week. This is in children's services where you would think they would be a little more flexible but sadly not. It's depressing not being able to utilize my skill set just because I want to spend more time with my child.

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    This is another fine example that there is so much room for improvement in many many workplaces to make them more family and women friendly.
    http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/mp-refused...225-1tv2z.html

    I am sooooo very lucky with my job. I get to work at home, in the evenings after the children go to bed. (I work in my jarmies ) Whilst it's not a flash paying job and it's not in my usual profession (but in the same industry) the pay is reasonable. Every few weeks I have to go into the office for a day (the humanity!! ) to touch base and catch up with colleagues and my boss.

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    Default The real reason why more women don’t rise to the top of companies

    Bec do you mind if I ask what industry you work in?

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    Quote Originally Posted by NancyBlackett View Post
    Too many still are though - it's disappointing.
    After 20 years working in 2 of the largest law firms in Australia I agree with the article and what the tutor said. I would definitely not be encouraging my girls into law. I worked for female partners and wouldn't have swapped their lives for mine for all the money in the world. The fact is though not every woman wants to be with their kids all the time, or even a lot of the time. Many I worked with loved what they did and loved being a lawyer and found their time with their kids quite draining. I know because I felt like that at times too. It was only when I was on extended leave when we moved interstate towards the end of my 3rd pregnancy that I finally found being at home rewarding.

    Towards the end of my working at my last firm I realised it wasn't working when I would get home at 10 pm and DD1 (5 at the time) would still be awake waiting for me to come home. It broke my heart.

    The problem is extremely complex. Professionals get paid a lot of money and you're expected to work hard in return. We charge clients a lot too so they expect high quality work delivered extremely quickly. That doesn't translate well to work life balance.

    There are a lot of places that get it right, but it usually comes down to the individuals working in the team, and whether they are prepared to support the part time worker on their non work day. I spent too many hours in play grounds on my blackberry talking to clients or responding to emails. I missed too much.

    At the end of the day I could have stayed and fought, but I stepped away so I could be there more for my kids. This isn't an area I wanted to be a trail blazer in

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    Quote Originally Posted by jez View Post
    Bec do you mind if I ask what industry you work in?
    I work for someone who has their own niche consultancy firm. I manage the database and tidy CVs. I have known the owner/boss for many years and worked for him in my usual role on 3 previous occasions (I'm usually a contractor) and when I asked around my work contacts if anyone had any work at home work for after DD was born he came forward.

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    Just wanted to clarify my comments - I was only disagreeing with the statement that women struggle to get jobs in law firms, not anything else - highly agree with the fact that it is a "boys club" in a lot of places and not compatible with spending a lot of time with your family. I have found the firms who advertise themselves as promoting work life balance are usually the very worst.

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to shelle65 For This Useful Post:

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