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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by missie_mack View Post
    And you know what it is such a AUSTRALIAN issue. In Europe men and children wear pink all the time, nobody bats an eyelid. Infact I often wonder if it is a class issue- because it is mostly in cheaper shops you see the limited colours. When you shop at more expensive places there seems to be much less of an issue and more colour choices.
    I think it does have a alot to do with social classes..... We have 2 stores in 2 very differnt socio economic areas (ie people from the more expensive area won't drive to our other store, even though it's 10 mins away)

    For the boys in our higher socioeconomic area they get lots of colours (no pinks because sport brands don't really make them) but lots of light blues ect they sell like hot cakes!

    In the lower socioeconomic area we don't bother with these colours, if it's not black, navy, red or dark 'manly' green it sits on the shelf until we send it to the other store!

    Please note- this is a massive generalization based on my own experience, and is definatly not always the case!

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by roz2288 View Post
    it would take a lot for me to get over if my son or sons came to me and said they wanna wear pink but id have to deal with it.
    Not even dresses. Just pink. You'd seriously have that much of a problem with your sons wanting to wear pink?



    I'm sorry but that's literally shocked me.
    Perhaps I may be judging you unfairly... But I'm yet to work out how. I know literally 20-30 guys who are young, buff and confident in themselves and are completely comfortable wearing a pastel pink shirt when they go out for a night on the town. Some of them have regular skin care routines, get their hair done at a hairdressers to get tips and foils done, and have the occasional manicure with their lady friends!
    There's absolutely NO question about their sexuality (at least a good quarter of them are married or have girlfriends) and they're all 'manly' men. Army boys no less!

    So your assertion that you'd find it difficult to accept a son's desire to wear pink is, quite frankly, amazing to me.

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    Oh and on the colour issue - I can't see boys being bullied simply for wearing pink - I could totally see my eldest, particularly, wearing pink or purple or something and he and his mates wouldn't bat an eyelid. I think a boy wearing a dress is a different issue altogether.

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    I would absolutely NOT allow my son to wear a dress out in public; the world is a very very cruel place.

    Don't get me wrong, I don't agree with gender stereotyping at all, but it's not me that's the problem, nor is it you OP, or afew ladies on a parenting forum. It's everyone else, I really don't see many people who would be accepting of this.
    As you and some PP have mentioned, pink shirts is ok, dress ups, boys fashion and design, jewellery etc, is all ok, but I think that allowing him to wear a standard girl's dress is just setting him up for so much bullying, and I would also worry about bullying of his siblings if their friends saw.

    Good luck OP, sounds like a really tricky situation.

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    its not like i actually say to my boys there's no way your wearing pink we dont have this issue so we dont talk about it

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    It's a hard one, and good on you for not only looking out for your son but challenging your own reasoning as well.

    Personally, I THINK at his age I'd try to explain to him my concerns. If I thought he understood the potential consequences of wearing dresses etc. in public, then it'd be up to him to make his own decision.

    As I say, I THINK that's what I'd do... but I don't yet have a child of his age, and of course you want to protect him.

    Good luck. There are plenty of others out there in this situation - hopefully you find support and advice whatever option you choose to take.

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    i couldn't be bothered reply to you all my thought and opinions are mine and ill raise my kids to accept people for who they are and not what they wear or look like. i dont have a problem with others allowing there boys to dress in whatever their boy please but im the way i am and i dress my boys like boys


    good luck to the poster

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    Default If your son loved wearing dresses...

    I have zero issue with colour, and an interesting point was raised between the price paid and the colours & styles you can choose from. DS is 4 and had multiple pink and purple shirts that are all fred bare. They don't look 'feminine' in any way in terms of lace and ruffles. That being said, he also had shirts with embellishments such as diamontes and metallic foil - a range which transcends from adult male clothes. I have no issues with him wearing this and have never had a negative comment (people often say he looks 'trendy').

    That being said, I agree - dresses and jewellry are another idea completely. Honestly? I wouldn't let my son wear a dress in public. He can go for gold at home, I couldn't care less. I certainly wouldn't buy him dresses and encourage him to wear them - but if he showed an interest in them and asked for one... No hesitating from me. I'm not sure why I wouldn't let him wear them in public... It goes against what I believe in (self expression, non conforming etc)... But at the end of the day, I'm far too sensitive for the opinions from the general public or teasing that could come from it. Horrible I know... I wish I could care less what other people think sometimes.

    Novel over lol

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    I too, have a boy child who loves wearing dresses. The 4.5yo can often be found raiding his older sisters wardrobe. He loves dressing up, pretending to be women (he wanted to be known as Anastasia for quite a while!), loves playing with the pink handbags, sparkly tiaras, nail polish etc...

    I think for him, he will "grow out" of it as his interest has lessened somewhat over the past 6 months, but for what it's worth, I let him wear whatever he likes, at home AND in public.

    Now he's older and more aware though, when it comes to dresses, I let him know that some people might think it's a bit funny and might look at him but that it's still okay to wear, though he usually chooses not to. He will still happily wear pink, purples, tiaras, nail polish etc in public though.

    It is a tough spot to be in, i'm all for acceptance and allowing my children to do what they want to do, fashion wise, but knowing that others may be cruel does play on my mind, which is why now that he's older, i'll explain things to him and leave the choice to him, whilst still being encouraging of his individuality, IYKWIM?


 

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