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  1. #11
    Zombie_eyes's Avatar
    Zombie_eyes is offline Formerly Diamondeyes
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    My kids have so many issues with food. I offer the food, i dont force. Who knows how they little brains are processing even the sight of the food infront of them (little one is mainly a white/beige eater...even the sight of coloured food sends him hysterical)

    I have never forced my children to eat something ive made, and this has worked out well, my 7 year old used to be like my little one, but now he eats so much more variety than the OT and paed or i ever expected. He still has many aversions, but doing pretty great so im happy.

    I used to be forced to eat my veg (i didnt have a problem with most except carrot) and id be forced to eat it and get a good smack if i threw it up.

  2. #12
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    Yes and no, I don't buy processed or fast food, packet food or any processed or deli meats or white bread so he won't eat them at home, when he is older and at school I can't control that but I won't buy them for him , I have not eaten birds or mammals for 25 years but have cooked them and give them ( organic) to DS as I want him to try all foods and if he chooses not to eat meat as he gets older would be great but I won't force him - we do BLW so he eats whatever he wants and how much he chooses of what we eat
    Last edited by Elijahs Mum; 12-08-2012 at 17:35.

  3. #13
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    Yeah, I Guess majority rules in this house in that I am GF, and two of my kids are as well - so we went GF as a household, the whole cross contamination was too much hassle. Anyhow - when hubby went GF with us, he started to notice he would feel really ill when he ate gluten and stuff, he has never been tested. So two of my kids could eat gluten. But they don't really get the chance because they are not old enough to go get it themselves. And to me honest I can't be giving two of them gluten and then trying to explain to a 3 year old kid on the spectrum why he can't have the same thing.

    So yeah - two of my kids are gluten free for no reason other than it is easier for me and our household.

  4. #14
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    I don't force my kids to eat anything, they are served food and they either eat it or they don't - i encourage them to give things a go before deciding it is 'yuk' but if they don't, they don't. They are generally pretty good eaters, they go through stages of refusing all vegetables etc but i just keep on offering and they end up eating it again eventually.
    I try to make meals i know or think they will like, obviously i don't feed them things i don't want them to have so in that way i am imposing my beliefs on them.

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    No, I choose not to eat beef or lamb but I intentionally make food with these foods in it for DD. I am purposefully making sure she eats everything - at least everything she can (she has multiple intolerances) and want to make sure she has exposure to everything so she can make decisions when she is older what she will and wont eat.

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    I agree with most of the PP. I want my DS to try everything but I am happy to let him make decisions about what he wants to eat.
    I can't stand onions and I hate the fact that my mother always forced me to eat onion just because she did. If any of my children have any food aversions I am happy to make sure I do not cook it for them.
    Eta: of course I would not feed them junk food either if they didn't want to chooses a healthy option they would probably go without
    Last edited by Mod-Zeddie; 12-08-2012 at 17:47.

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    we have all sorts in this house.

    I "enforce" healthy eating...5 serves veg, 2-3 of fruit, protein, grains and healthy fats daily.

    DS has intollerances so i cater for these...of the things he can eat...he hates carrot....so, no carrot for him

    DD is now dairy free lol so that means she eats diff to DS. But, they both have soy milk (in moderation) and she eats a very varied diet. However, she went through a faze of not eating pasta but loving rice...i catered for this...now she loves pasta and not rice lol

    DH loves hot curry and is a whiz at cooking it from scratch...he cooks most of our grown up meals!

    I don't eat cheese and am fussy with meat...so, i don't eat these...but DH and DS LOVE cheese...so i cook it for them.

    Every Sunday, i make a meal fort he whole family (it's a challenge lol) and we all eat together...everyone must sit and eat this meal...no complaints! Every other night, the kids normally at early...and every week night we have activities that means that there is a split shift for dinner!

    I believe in balance and I don't want to cause any stress over food as I feel that it should be something to enjoy and something to nourish us and causing stress and tears over something that should be joyous, goes against what i feel.

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    I think its good for kids to have a little bit of everything, then as they get older they will develop their own tastes. I was raised on a "normal" diet in the 80s/90s and i decided to become a vegetarian (and later vegan for a period) on my own at 11. I haven't touched red meat since, but it was completely my own decision.

    My brother raised his son on a mega strict vegan diet from birth. So strict if the kid grabbed a piece of bread off the table as a toddler they would try to make him spit it out thinking it was going to have some huge allergic reaction. The poor kid couldn't mix with other children well at birthday parties and the like because he wasn't allowed cake, lollies, milk anything like that at all. At his school they had this lovely routine in the mornings (a steiner school) of baking bread in kindy and sharing it together every lunchtime and he was never allowed to join in because they refused to let him eat bread (he's not gluten intolerant). In my opinion it was detrimental to him because now he's a teenager, he's overweight and lives on junk food, i think because he was denied it so much as a child.

    I think its good to give kids a little bit of all healthy foods, and they will develop their own tastebuds. I don't think you should force kids to eat things they don't like. I'm vegetarian (and have been vegan) but i will still give my kids a bit of meat (probably biodynamic/cruelty free) and they can make their own lifestyle choices when they are old enough.
    Last edited by Clementine Grace; 12-08-2012 at 17:39.

  9. #19
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    We live with my parents..it makes it impossible for "me" to "impose" anything..every time I have my back turned DD is begging for whatever I told her she isn't allowed to eat, like 5 minutes later. Sigh.
    I'm lucky..she eats well though. She loves fruit and veg, and meat, little carnivore (I don't eat much of it), but she loves crisps. Omg, does she love crisps. I am a complete sugar hound, so I just don't get it. I guess it means peaceful coexistence for the rest of our lives though.

  10. #20
    Busy-Bee's Avatar
    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
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    Only to the extent that we eat standard food readily available in Australia.

    I'm veggie by DF is not. The children often have veggie meals, the aim is that they will grow up believing veggie is just as 'normal' as omnivorism. If DF was a veggie then I'm guessing we would cook only veggie meals but I would't try and stop them them from eating meat at parties or whereever.


 

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