+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 9 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 81
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    21,654
    Thanks
    15,094
    Thanked
    11,267
    Reviews
    14
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the WeekBusiest Member of the Week - week ended 5/2/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 31/10/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 24/10/14Busiest Member of the Week
    Yes it can be hard, We were lucky that dd was able to transfer from her job here to a job there at her closet store.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    547
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    268
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Thermolicious View Post
    There are other methods of study apart from uni or school based apprenticeships. I just don't think a fast food job ect is a good way to invest your time if that's not the field you want to work in and if it is I think doing managerial courses or the like is a good idea first.
    I prefer to look at it as its not just a job in fast food or scanning groceries ... They learn the responsibility of having to be somewhere at a certain time, working with colleagues, dealing with difficult customers and most importantly the value of the $$$.

    Prior to children I worked in recruitment I had two focus' in my role single parents and youth. You would not believe how many youngies came in thinking cause they had a business management cert that they would get a job as a supervisor or manager ... They did not want to come in at the base level ... Why??? They were 18-20 years old had no work exp and mummy and daddy had told them you study hard, get good grades you will get a great job ... They seemed to forget you start at the bottom, get experience and work your way up to a great job.

    I would rather prepare my children for life not just academia. I never received pocket money, I was still expected to help around the house. I worked from 14 (2 shifts per week - maybe 6 or 7 hrs p wk) ... By the time I finished VCe I had bought my car, paid for all my drivibg lessons and paid for a holiday.
    After VCe I was at UNi I then worked 15 hrs p wk - I now had to pay for car and phone.

    I'm curious the parents who will support their children does that mean you will provide $$ for cars clothes, fuel, outings with friends, etc ... And until what age ??? If your child does yr 12 UNi , post grad you could be fully supporting them well into their 20s ... Would you be happy with that? Would they be happy to ask mum and dad for $$ for everything. They do?

  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Smartiecat For This Useful Post:

    JaneDoe  (11-08-2012),LoveLivesHere  (12-08-2012)

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,011
    Thanks
    429
    Thanked
    542
    Reviews
    17
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    2 of my girls work and it's never affected their school work. It gives them confidence, responsibility and experience for when they leave school

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    'Stralia
    Posts
    947
    Thanks
    386
    Thanked
    95
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I worked during high school and my marks were fine. When I quit so I could focus on the hsc I probably should've stayed working. Brilliant discipline and without it I got lazy.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to backgroundnoise For This Useful Post:

    wherewerewe91  (11-08-2012)

  7. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2,975
    Thanks
    3,600
    Thanked
    892
    Reviews
    15
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I support DD having a casual job (1-2 shifts a week) while at school, provided it didn't interfere with her school work. I'd probably encourage her to get one. I think it teaches a lot of valuable skills.

    I worked from when I was 14 years, 9 months at a supermarket, about 8 hours a week. I saved $50 a week to put towards going to uni and then the rest (anywhere from $20 - $50 depending on whether I did full Saturday shift) was for me to spend however I wanted.

  8. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    675
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked
    119
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I think it's a brilliant idea to work casually while in school. I started working at McDonalds when I was 14 and through my HSC then at Coles while at uni. I always had a job since 14 until I started my maternity leave. Didn't interfere with my study and I think it's a great way to learn responsibility as you transition into adulthood.

    I respect others may feel differently but for me encouraging our DD to have a casual job will teach her valuable lessons about balancing responsibilities eg work and study etc. Study is important but so is general work experience even if just in fast food.

  9. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    10,316
    Thanks
    3,126
    Thanked
    6,322
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Smartiecat View Post

    I'm curious the parents who will support their children does that mean you will provide $$ for cars clothes, fuel, outings with friends, etc ... And until what age ??? If your child does yr 12 UNi , post grad you could be fully supporting them well into their 20s ... Would you be happy with that? Would they be happy to ask mum and dad for $$ for everything. They do?
    My parents paid for everything until I got my first job at 18, I think also it depends a lot on the attitude of the parent, the school experience etc. they also need to teach responsibility, my parents had their own business so working hard/long hours didn't worry us , we all have our own businesses now and I've never been unemployed, but have interviewed many young job applicants and really there is not much difference in attitude/ability ( in my experience) for those who worked or not before , one of our assistants we were her first job out of school and she is fantastic, the one we just fired worked at KFC and was hopeless!

  10. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    5,687
    Thanks
    1,089
    Thanked
    4,057
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    For me it depends on the teen and the job.

    I'd be looking at things like their current commitments, the employers attitude about school being more important than their business for this employee.

    My employer in high school (fashion retail) was always begging me to skip school to fill in on shifts. When I later employed high school students I asked for a copy of their school year (holidays, exams) and to meet their parents before hiring them, we discussed their availability, their commitments and their limitations with the parents to ensure it was realistic and suitable (after discussing it one on one), I got a bit of 'don't hold their hands' from upper management, but these teens went through the process like a 25 or 45 year old would've, it was just the final closing piece that I felt contributed to their employee/employer relationship. I treated them as adults, this was often the only time their parents had anything to do with their employment.

    I don't think it's necessary thing for a teen to do and I won't push for it. Our kids will be exposed to work ethic through service to others and helping out with family members businesses. I have many more priorities for my kids.

  11. #49
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    12,222
    Thanks
    457
    Thanked
    533
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    yeah good idea I worked casually at a supermarket from 15! mum stopped giving me pocket money at that age so if I wanted money to hang with friends, buy new clothes I had to earn it. I also paid for my schoolies out of my tax return that year and paid about half of my first car!

  12. #50
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    12,222
    Thanks
    457
    Thanked
    533
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    ad I only used to work Thursday nights and Saturday's so I didn't think it affected my grades at all!

    I'm glad I did as when I started Uni I had to move away and fend for myself so without having previously worked part tome and learnt to save I would have even screwed !


 
+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 9 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. "spin off" do you think kids should wear school uniforms?
    By Elijahs Mum in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 100
    Last Post: 26-08-2013, 14:44
  2. Spin off.. high school parties
    By bumMum in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-08-2012, 01:00
  3. *Spin off from a spin off* Fave kids shows
    By JaneDoe in forum General Chat
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 12-07-2012, 20:03

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Tambo Teddies
Visit our online store and select your individually handmade natural sheepskin teddy bear. Our soft and loveable bears come in a range of styles and colours. Created in Outback Queensland each bear is unique individual. 100% Australian made!
sales & new stuffsee all
CarmelsBeautySecrets
Growing your own natural nails is easy. Years ago, I devised a simple and very effective technique which really helps boosts the nails' growth in as little as three days! And most importantly keeps them that way.
featured supporter
HuggleBib
The HuggleBib is not "just another" baby bib. Sure, your child may be a messy eater who gets more food ON them rather than IN them, so you dread cleaning after feeding times! Well the HuggleBib is THE best solution to help with all these daily tasks!
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!