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  1. #31
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  2. #32
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    From the moment we are born we are conditioned to be in teams. Certainly at least once kids reach Kindy age, they are put into groups, taught to support the team. There's no I in team they say. At school they are put into house groups, sports teams, maths groups. I think it is the way we are conditioned. While team spirit can be inspiring, I think patriotism can be detrimental.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MissMuppet View Post
    Oh I'm not wondering about 'why do we watch or why do we love the Olympics' because I do understand that some people love sports and all that side of it.

    Its more the patriotic element that I'm starting to question. As in why do (some of us) get so emotionally invested in Australians winning and moving up the medal tally. Does it really matter if the Australian wins rather than the British person, or the Spanish or the South African? That's where I get lost.

    I think what Girl x said about group identity and basking in referred glory makes sense.
    That response was more about people who find it boing, not you OP nobody has to watch it, and I ferl bad when people watch (or do) anything out of peer pressure, or because they think they should/are supposed to.

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  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Refresh View Post
    From the moment we are born we are conditioned to be in teams. Certainly at least once kids reach Kindy age, they are put into groups, taught to support the team. There's no I in team they say. At school they are put into house groups, sports teams, maths groups. I think it is the way we are conditioned. While team spirit can be inspiring, I think patriotism can be detrimental.
    That's a good point. We are conditioned from school to get into the 'team spirit' and to support our house team or our school sporting teams and to feel proud when our school football team or school orchestra wins a competition even if we weren't a part of it ourselves.

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    We are enjoying watching the lesser shown sports...in this house, Judo and Gymnastics are the major ones as DS does Karate and Gymnastics. It has been great for him to talk about the sports he loves and see just how good you can get if you dedicated yourself.

    The opening ceremony doubled as a geography lesson and flag lesson ... he already knew about the different ages of England lol

    I don't mind who wins, we celebrate every winner. It is special for an Australian to win, it is where we live after all.

    It is not "the most important thing ever", but, like anything else we celebrate and watch....it's fun to be involved

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    The Olympics is to world leaders what penis's are to men.

    - bigger ->more 'medals'->more power->other people think twice about picking on you

  10. #37
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    SpecialPatrolGroup is offline T-rex is cranky until she gets her coffee.
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    I do get a bit caught up in the emotion of the games. It does unify people, and it is often symbolic of change in the world that some people would never be aware of, for example, the first ever female athletes from Saudi Arabia to participate in the games. The things that really stand out for me are the athletes whose individual stories are remarkable, the marathon runners who limp across the line supported by everyone, from every country, just for the show of sheer determination to do it *sob sob*. Gets me every time.

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    I love the Olympics, watch them every time.

    I am very patriotic and love to see our countrymen win....

    I love the diving, gymnastics and the swimming...

    For those that dont, just change the channel....!

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    FearlessLeader is offline Winner 2013 - Most Memorable Thread
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    We always chose a small nation to support, one year it was Uzbekistan, one year was Tuvalu. I generally don't have time for sport, but i truly think the Olympics is a unifying event with so many incredible personal stories. Most olympians aren't glamorous or rich or well known, they are just amazingly talented and dedicated at what they do.
    Australia's a small country, and i think the fact we punch above our weight in sport is something to be proud of. We also punch above our weight in the arts and sciences too which should be celebrated much more, but just because it's not doesn't mean that we shouldn't be proud of our athletes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ~Bec~ View Post
    We are such a miniscule country on the world political stage but we punch so far above our weight when it comes to sport I can't help but feel so very proud.
    This is what I actually hate the most - the fact that we are over-represented at the Olympics in terms of country/popultation size makes it clear that:

    1. Australia spends way too much money on sport; and
    2. Australia is such a privileged country that it can afford to spend too much money on sport and be heavily involved in what is essentially a frivolous endeavour, when other countries struggle to send 2-3 athletes.

    Imagine if Australia spent 1% less on Australian athletes and used that money to sponsor athletes from other, poorer countries to be able to train and compete in the Olympics they otherwise wouldn't have the chance to. I would be much prouder of Australia for doing that than winning a million gold medals.

    Winning a gold medal doesn't mean you are the best in the world. Winning a gold medal means you are the best out of those from a privileged country who had the resources to train you.

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