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  1. #1
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    Question Advice re: unusal crying-holding breath then vague episode please.

    Hi All,
    I would like to know if anyone has experienced or heard of the following.
    My son will cry (say for something as simple as seeing his bottle as I am making it up and wanting it NOW) to the point where he holds his breath for 6-8 seconds or so. As he is holding his breath he then throws himself back and just lays there on the floor, staring at whatever, when I pick him up he just looks around the room as if being there for the first time and it's then as if nothing had happened, no more crying, just silence.
    I am concerned that this is not normal.
    What does everyone/anyone think?

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    He is 11 months old.

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    A surprising number of children do this. My brother used to do it to. Does he actually faint? Google Syncope and see if it sound familiar. A tip, when he holds his breath, blow really hard straight in his face. Often this will startle him into breathing. Alternatively, squirt some cold water in his face as this will have a similar effect. These are what the doctor told my mum to do with my brother when he held his breath during crying fits. I know the blowing air method works as I have used it at work before. If it gets worse or more frequent it might be worth a gp visit just to put your mind at ease and rule anything out.

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    My DD is a breath holder - hers is called cynotic breath holding or blue pallid spells. Sharp or sudden pain or not getting her own way sometimes will set it off. Her cry changes- she goes stiff, stops breathing, blue around the mouth, grey in the face, her eyes roll to the whites and she passes out. Once she passes out she starts to breath again. A really bad one and sometimes her arms twitch. She has the extreme form of it.

    Hers started around 10 months and at 4.5 are still going. It peaked around 2.5 when we had a least one a week, then we didnt have one for nearly 12 months. Suddenly this year - we've had five.

    There is pretty much nothing you can do. She has been prodded and poked from one end to the next. Nothing will stop it once it is started. I did it as a child to and seemed to have lived through the experience ok. My primary concern is not getting to her fast enough when she goes down and her hitting her head on something. It does freak other people out. (I've had my fair share of day carers on the phone in tears...)

    She is a bit vague (and often tired) after a "spell" and I keep a close eye on her - but I never give in to the behaviour or make a big fuss about it.

    She is at kindy now and they have required I write up a medical action plan and explain what happens to all the carers.

    I would mention it to your doctor and ask your parents if there is a family history.

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    angemum2b2  (06-10-2012)

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    my DD is a apnea baby ( i say baby she is 6 and a half year and still does ) her alarm for breath holding wont go of for 20 seconds anything less than 20 seconds is ok, still scary if its new but doesnt harm them in anyway, mention it to the dr but

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    Thankyou for all your input. It has been a while now. Fortunately my son's 'events' became less frequent, however he has had 2 tantrums in the last 3 days which have resulted in him crying and holding his breath until he has passed out. I am also relating it to being tired. He started to breath again after I blew in his face, but he actually went cyanosed and it was a bit scary. It took him a while to fully recover. I have an appointment with my child health nurse next week to talk it over. People say to ignore tantrums, which is what I did (in very close proximity) when I think maybe I shouldn't have because he actually stopped breathing. Hmm, still concerned.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raising Leprechauns View Post
    My DD is a breath holder - hers is called cynotic breath holding or blue pallid spells. Sharp or sudden pain or not getting her own way sometimes will set it off. Her cry changes- she goes stiff, stops breathing, blue around the mouth, grey in the face, her eyes roll to the whites and she passes out. Once she passes out she starts to breath again. A really bad one and sometimes her arms twitch. She has the extreme form of it.

    Hers started around 10 months and at 4.5 are still going. It peaked around 2.5 when we had a least one a week, then we didnt have one for nearly 12 months. Suddenly this year - we've had five.

    There is pretty much nothing you can do. She has been prodded and poked from one end to the next. Nothing will stop it once it is started. I did it as a child to and seemed to have lived through the experience ok. My primary concern is not getting to her fast enough when she goes down and her hitting her head on something. It does freak other people out. (I've had my fair share of day carers on the phone in tears...)

    She is a bit vague (and often tired) after a "spell" and I keep a close eye on her - but I never give in to the behaviour or make a big fuss about it.

    She is at kindy now and they have required I write up a medical action plan and explain what happens to all the carers.

    I would mention it to your doctor and ask your parents if there is a family history.
    This describes my 2.5 year old to a tee! I can't remember when his started but at 31 months it is happening very frequently now.


 

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