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  1. #31
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    Lilly, I feel the same in that i'd rather more of the responsibility falls on adults to boost herd immunity, rather than babies. Our bodies have already been exposed to so many toxins in our lifetime- what's a few more! Compared with a 6 week old getting pumped full of vaccine!

    I'm pretty sure rubella immunity wanes as most women I know (inc myself) have had to have boosters. Unless its because as kids we were never immunised against it, instead we all had the illness (well most of us at least had mumps and measles), so maybe because we only had the shot in high school we needed another one to make it work properly or something? Also WC obviously isn't forever. I have no idea about others.

    Anyway I believe in herd immunity, but I do believe there needs to be more emphasis on adults being up to date. I dont believe most are up to date at all- especially with WC. Health professionals-yes, but general population I doubt it. It is widely known that most babies catch WC From their parents or close relatives, not from unvaxxed kids, so in the WC battle I really think this is where they need to target. Apparently the reason parents no longer get the vaccine free isn't because it's not working but because it's not 'cost effective', there are only a handful of deaths a year so it's not worth the govt subsidising it! Anyway, I dunno if maybe part of the reason these diseases are coming back now is because OUR immunity is starting to wear off? I dunno?

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    Lillynix  (16-07-2012)

  3. #32
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    I think you are right with regards to Rubella, it says on the immunise Australia website that to be fully covered you need two shots. One at 12 months and one a 4 years.

    When I was growing up they started the shots at school - but that was only the one rubella shot that was separate. So my reading of that is, if you didn't get the second shot it wasn't as effective.

    Also - if you go onto the site it tells you all these other things, like if you were born before 1966, you need to have a booster as well because it wasn't effective etc etc.

    I think lots of different factors come into play.

    I agree with getting titre levels checked. Unfortunately I don't think it is very accurate for whooping cough - I asked to get mine done and the doctor said that some people can still catch it again even if they have some immunity etc. So it was worth just keeping on top of the boosters - and the time that they last depends entirely on the person. So annoying!

    I agree with you about Adults being vaccinated.

    Quote Originally Posted by Annabella View Post
    Lilly, I feel the same in that i'd rather more of the responsibility falls on adults to boost herd immunity, rather than babies. Our bodies have already been exposed to so many toxins in our lifetime- what's a few more! Compared with a 6 week old getting pumped full of vaccine!

    I'm pretty sure rubella immunity wanes as most women I know (inc myself) have had to have boosters. Unless its because as kids we were never immunised against it, instead we all had the illness (well most of us at least had mumps and measles), so maybe because we only had the shot in high school we needed another one to make it work properly or something? Also WC obviously isn't forever. I have no idea about others.

    Anyway I believe in herd immunity, but I do believe there needs to be more emphasis on adults being up to date. I dont believe most are up to date at all- especially with WC. Health professionals-yes, but general population I doubt it. It is widely known that most babies catch WC From their parents or close relatives, not from unvaxxed kids, so in the WC battle I really think this is where they need to target. Apparently the reason parents no longer get the vaccine free isn't because it's not working but because it's not 'cost effective', there are only a handful of deaths a year so it's not worth the govt subsidising it! Anyway, I dunno if maybe part of the reason these diseases are coming back now is because OUR immunity is starting to wear off? I dunno?

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  5. #33
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    Rubella is indeed a tricky one, in that for many women it doesn't give lasting immunity. I remember having a vaccination in highschool for Rubella, assuming it was MMR, i've no idea of the vaxx schedule I was given, i've tried a Google search, but nothing helpful.

  6. #34
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    MMR has only been out since 1989, so if you had it before then ( like me ) it would have just been the single Rubella vax that we got in year 7 at school, also I was just speaking with my mum at lunch and she said I never got measles or mumps shots when I was little at they were not offered ( born 1970) I remember getting a needle at 5 before school
    But she thinks it was a dtap booster
    Last edited by Elijahs Mum; 16-07-2012 at 14:51.

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    Lillynix  (16-07-2012)

  8. #35
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    I was born in 77, and I got Measles and mumps done in the one shot in year 4, Elijah's mum is right- the shots in high school were single rubella shots. And you would have needed them twice to be effective.

    The government really does need to start telling people what boosters are needed. I would consider us more read that most people and even we don't know half of what is going on!

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  10. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    I was born in 77, and I got Measles and mumps done in the one shot in year 4, Elijah's mum is right- the shots in high school were single rubella shots. And you would have needed them twice to be effective.

    The government really does need to start telling people what boosters are needed. I would consider us more read that most people and even we don't know half of what is going on!
    That's why I started the adult vaccine thread. People just starting out in childcare, even at 40+ are unaware of their own status, only what they remember having.

  11. #37
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    And I for one do find it alarming that people are happy to vaccinate their children for the sake of their health, but put no thought into their own health when it comes to vaccination.

    It really does boggle my mind and the Government should definitely step up in promoting adult boosters more. Perhaps Doctors/Nurses could bring up adult vaccination with parents when their child gets vaccinated. It would be a start...

    *I can haz typos*

  12. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    I was just thinking about all the recent threads and that we all seemed to agree most adult vaccinations/boosters are not up to date plus the stats show over 70-80% of people contracting VPD are over the age of 10, so how can herd immunity exist ( in adults anyway) if most are not immunised? (especially with the newer vaccines like Hep b, chicken pox, meningococcal and rotavirus only introduced in the last decade)
    I thought I might attempt a more technical answer to this question (while trying to keep things in English ).

    First, herd immunity only applies to contagious diseases, which excludes infectious diseases such as tetanus, malaria, and sexually transmitted infections. So not all vaccines aim for herd immunity.

    Second, herd immunity as a general concept simply means a sufficiently high level of immunity in a population such that a degree of protection for those not immune is provided (because they are less likely to come into contact with an infected person). In practice, this means achieving the herd immunity threshold for that particular disease, which in a well-mixed population is:
    1-(1/R0)
    where R0 is the reproduction rate, meaning the average number of people an individual with the disease would infect in a population that had no immunity. So a disease with an R0 of 10, would require a herd immunity threshold of 90%, and at that level any occurrence of the disease would "die out" without further measure such as quarantine, and if maintained the disease would be eliminated from the population.

    But populations are not "well-mixed". This makes the mathematics of our models somewhat intractable, but it also means swift action by public health authorities can contain outbreaks more easily through vaccination of susceptible individuals and physical isolation of infected subgroups.

    But the health community generally operates on the basis that the threshold values derived from the simple models apply and regard immunity levels falling below these nominal values as a public health threat for most VPDs. The fact diseases such as measles, polio and diphtheria are no longer endemic in Australia indicates herd immunity was/has been reached for them. This is no small measure due to the fact that adults who were not vaccinated (because the vaccine did not exist) were in the main no longer susceptible to infection, as for instance is the case with rotavirus now.
    Last edited by JohnC; 11-04-2013 at 08:26.


 

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