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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boobycino View Post
    yeah that strikes me as an odd comparison when numbers of nut allergies are rising while fewer people exclusively breast feed.

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using BubHub
    how I read it was that while exclusive bfing was falling, the nut allergies in children were higher in that group that comp or ff kids.

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    Yes I thought they discredited the theory as well lambjam?

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    how I read it was that while exclusive bfing was falling, the nut allergies in children were higher in that group that comp or ff kids.
    It only says "15000 children were studied" it doesnt state if the 15,000 were exclusively breastfed or not. The whole article is a jumbled mess if you ask me. I would love to read the actual research paper.
    My son was exclusively breastfed and doesnt have any allergies.

  4. #14
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    Found it. Paste this into your web browser and you can download the pdf. www.hindawi.com/journals/ijped/aip/675724.pdf

    Infant Feeding Practices and Nut allergy over Time in Australian School Entrant Children. Published in International Journal of Paediatrics.

    The research article found that 5% of the exclusively breastfed group had a strong nut allergy versus 2.7% that were fed other fluid/food only and 3.7% that were breastfed as well as given other fluid/food in the first 6 months.
    Last edited by HouseOfFun; 12-07-2012 at 19:07.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HouseOfFun View Post
    It only says "15000 children were studied" it doesnt state if the 15,000 were exclusively breastfed or not. The whole article is a jumbled mess if you ask me. I would love to read the actual research paper.
    My son was exclusively breastfed and doesnt have any allergies.
    well 15k is a small sample and a difference of 2percent really is neither here nor there is it? I would say the 2% is worth it to bf.... and I'm a stanch supporter of ffers on here as most know so that isn't a jab at ffing.

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    It appears that this paper suggests introducing foods before 6 months is what has the protective effect. I agree that the 2% is very small and I would not avoid breastfeeding, nor eating nuts in pregnancy based on this research. But I think it may add weight to the current trend of advice towards introducing some foods before 6 months (even as early as 4 months), particularly in children with a strong family history of food allergy.

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    beebs  (13-07-2012),Boobycino  (12-07-2012)

  9. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    well 15k is a small sample and a difference of 2percent really is neither here nor there is it? I would say the 2% is worth it to bf.... and I'm a stanch supporter of ffers on here as most know so that isn't a jab at ffing.
    It is definitely not an insignificant difference. The numbers imply that exclusive formula feeders are twice as likely to develop the allergy than exclusive breastfeeders. It is certainly statistically significant.

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    I have been wondering about this. My DS is anaphylactic to peanuts. We have no family history of food allergies but do have other risk factors such as history of eczema, hay fever and asthma. I exclusively breastfed DS for 6 months (apart from one top up feed on day 2) and went on to breastfeed until 14 months. I ate a lot of peanut butter throughout pregnancy and while breastfeeding and I have often wondered if it contributed. Since finding out about the peanut allergy I have found out how many packaged foods can have traces of peanuts in them and wondered about the contribution of that with modern diets. We don't have any peanuts or traces of in the house anymore so I won't be eating peanuts next pregnancy or while breastfeeding by default. I'll have to think about whether I eat other nuts now?? I've always held the opinion that avoidance wasn't the answer. I probably should go and look at the paper very carefully.

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Geez we just can't win can we? maybe we need to just give our babies fresh air and hope for the best
    Modern air is very polluted. Excess consumption of which can cause asthma, allergies and lung conditions.

    :P

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaddyLarge View Post
    It is definitely not an insignificant difference. The numbers imply that exclusive formula feeders are twice as likely to develop the allergy than exclusive breastfeeders. It is certainly statistically significant.
    I thought exclusive bfing was more likely than ffing for peanut allergy?


 

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