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  1. #11
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    We taught DD1 when she was 3 years old. I really do need to teach her my mobile number though....

  2. #12
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    I taught my oldest from 4, once she was old enough to grasp the concept, understand the seriousness of it etc.
    I haven't taught my middle child...I should though, she's nearly 5...it's just something I've left my oldest to be responsible for.

  3. #13
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    My kids have known how since they were around 2yo as I am a type 1 diabetic and am really unstable when pregnant. They have never prank called and know how to call not only from the landline but from my mobile as well. I have made sure that they always knew their address or where we were, just in case.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ToughLove View Post
    DD has been calling emergency since she was almost three.

    She's had to learn early; I have uncontrolled, severe epilepsy, and DH was cramming in studying and working. Alone at home with me, she's the only one who could help me.

    I actually wrote a 'teach your young child to call emergency services' tutorial for an epilepsy booklet once and I'd be happy to make a thread about it if you need it.

    On a traditional seizure time; I collapse, she goes to the phone we bought specially for the that purpose near the front door, and calls the ambulance using the guideline poster next to the phone.
    She waits with me until they arrive, usually I 'come to' and she's sitting next to me colouring or playing. I wait where I am {if I'll stay down; having a seizure totally addles your brains, so sometimes you get up and wander off. It's like waking up from a fever sleep}
    When they arrive they knock on the door, and if I'm still lying down she opens the door with the snib on to check they're uniformed, then closes the door, takes the snib off, lets them in, hands them my folder off the side table, and shows them where I am. Then as we're all heading out she gets her Hospital Bag off the hook near the door {it's a small satchell with crayons, a small notepad, a poptop drink and some bagged snacks} and follows them.
    Oh and don't forget the step where she tells them that all brave girls get lollipops and a bear

    By the time I'm in the ambulance I can answer questions coherently and have a clear idea of what's gone on.

    It's sad that she's had to learn, but at least if she's home with me I'm safe.
    That's great!

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToughLove View Post
    DD has been calling emergency since she was almost three.

    She's had to learn early; I have uncontrolled, severe epilepsy, and DH was cramming in studying and working. Alone at home with me, she's the only one who could help me.

    I actually wrote a 'teach your young child to call emergency services' tutorial for an epilepsy booklet once and I'd be happy to make a thread about it if you need it.

    On a traditional seizure time; I collapse, she goes to the phone we bought specially for the that purpose near the front door, and calls the ambulance using the guideline poster next to the phone.
    She waits with me until they arrive, usually I 'come to' and she's sitting next to me colouring or playing. I wait where I am {if I'll stay down; having a seizure totally addles your brains, so sometimes you get up and wander off. It's like waking up from a fever sleep}
    When they arrive they knock on the door, and if I'm still lying down she opens the door with the snib on to check they're uniformed, then closes the door, takes the snib off, lets them in, hands them my folder off the side table, and shows them where I am. Then as we're all heading out she gets her Hospital Bag off the hook near the door {it's a small satchell with crayons, a small notepad, a poptop drink and some bagged snacks} and follows them.
    Oh and don't forget the step where she tells them that all brave girls get lollipops and a bear

    By the time I'm in the ambulance I can answer questions coherently and have a clear idea of what's gone on.

    It's sad that she's had to learn, but at least if she's home with me I'm safe.
    Thanks ToughLove, some really great advice there! I'd really love it if you could share your tutorial


 

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