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    Default Speech Delay??

    DS is now 16 months old and does not say any words. He talks away to himself and to us but its just dibberish. He does not say mumma or dadda. If we sing a song he sings it back but its just like "da da dada" is a soft singing tone iykwim? He does point to things. If he doesnt want something he just turns his head or pushes it away. It is starting to worry us that he hasnt said anything yet. DH has a sister with autism, so it that something to worry about? Should I be asking for a referal to a speech therapist or wait? Thanks

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    I wouldn't worry just yet. Boys tend to not be as quick as girls at picking up speech. My DS has a speech delay so this is familiar territory for me. Just encourag him to say words, even things like "what sound does a doggy make" when you look at pictures, that sort of thing. If he hasn't said a distinct word in the next couple of months or so it might be worthwhile getting his hearing tested. If that turns out fine then definitely see a ST.

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    I'm the same AS Bec and am familiar with speech issues. My suggestion would be, OWL!

    Observe, Wait, Listen.

    OBSERVE what it is your child is interested in, what activity they love and are truly engaged in.
    WAIT after you ask them a question, or after you make a comment about the activity they are doing, it is natural for humans to really want to fill silence, we don't like silence on conversation and when you wait and count to 30 without saying a thing, your child is MUCH more likely to feel that urge to "fill the silence"
    LISTEN to what they do tell you and always repeat it back to them. If they say it incorrectly then don't correct them, just model the correct way to say it by saying it back.

    The waiting part is hard, but once you start doing it I think you'll begin to notice how we as adults sometimes do not give kids enough time to answer and to think about how they're going to reply. I know in my own experience I was surprised to find how much and how often I was answering for my son instead of truly waiting for him.


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    Thanks for your replies. I will definately start allowing more time for him to answer. If in a few months he has not improved I will get his hearing tested.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ~Bec~ View Post
    I wouldn't worry just yet. Boys tend to not be as quick as girls at picking up speech. My DS has a speech delay so this is familiar territory for me. Just encourag him to say words, even things like "what sound does a doggy make" when you look at pictures, that sort of thing. If he hasn't said a distinct word in the next couple of months or so it might be worthwhile getting his hearing tested. If that turns out fine then definitely see a ST.
    I hate it when people say boys are slower than girls. It is not true for everyone My DS was much quicker than all the baby girls I know.

    The rest of your reply I agree with though.

    Perhaps OP you could get him to communicate by teaching him a couple signs (baby sign language). I only ever used a couple but it helped before he could say the word to tell me what he wanted.
    If he is babbling then that is positive in that he's not being silent.
    I would suggest talking to him, about everything.. Where you are going, what you are doing.. Wait for him to reply and then continue the conversation as if he has said something you understand.
    If you're really concerned then speak to a doctor about your options, hearing test, speech therapist, waiting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy2be3 View Post
    I'm the same AS Bec and am familiar with speech issues. My suggestion would be, OWL!

    Observe, Wait, Listen.

    OBSERVE what it is your child is interested in, what activity they love and are truly engaged in.
    WAIT after you ask them a question, or after you make a comment about the activity they are doing, it is natural for humans to really want to fill silence, we don't like silence on conversation and when you wait and count to 30 without saying a thing, your child is MUCH more likely to feel that urge to "fill the silence"
    LISTEN to what they do tell you and always repeat it back to them. If they say it incorrectly then don't correct them, just model the correct way to say it by saying it back.

    The waiting part is hard, but once you start doing it I think you'll begin to notice how we as adults sometimes do not give kids enough time to answer and to think about how they're going to reply. I know in my own experience I was surprised to find how much and how often I was answering for my son instead of truly waiting for him.


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    This!!! Alot of health nurses and health professionals I talk to say if there still not talking at about 2yo, then thats when maybe you should see someone about it. But there alot of good books out there you can buy to help and encourage(as well as have interesting activities and games) speech and language development.

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    starla  (08-08-2012)

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    Ill add something that sometimes a lot of parents do by mistake (i was guilty of this!) try not to ask close ended questions.

    Instead of "do you want a drink" when u know he wants one. Say "do you want, water or milk?" give him a choice so he needs to communicate more than a yes or no, thosenthings can be communicated easily. If he points to the milk, say "milk! You want the milk! Which one did you want? Ater? Or milk? " as he gets older he will eventually catch on to this type of commentating/ type of questioning and start to answer. If still nothing by two, go to gp

    Goodluck.

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    We have been talking to him alot more even if its just silly things like putting away things etc etc... He points at everything!!! We have alot of framed baby photos and photos from our wedding he loves looking and pointing at them. We always ask him where is mummy and daddy? He just points to the photo. If we pick the photo up and hand it to him he will place his cheek on the photo (his way of kissing lol)

    He has been walking since he was 11 months old and recently we have noticed every now and then at home when excited and running around he will walk on his tip toes. He doesnt do this all the time mainly when happy. I have researched and most say its normal behaviour.

    I feel like Im becoming paranoid that something is wrong with him.

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    Well, as I'm sure you know, tip toe walking and delayed speech are flags for autism BUT they are only 2 of a whole pile of symptoms AND almost all kids I know went through a stage of tip toe walking etc etc. If you're seeing a speech that's all you can do for now and just keep your eyes peeled for anything else that may seem a bit different as he gets older.

    Don't be paranoid, but there's nothing wrong with being proactive and on the ball either :-)

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    I think tiptoe walking is a normal stage of development, particularly when children are that young (but can obviously indicate issues when considered in conjunction with other signs/symptoms).

    My DD also had delayed speech - she had one word at 18mths. I first flagged it with our MCH nurse and GP when she was about 12mths and I am annoyed at myself at listening to them ("wait and see") as it turned out she had hearing difficulties that were corrected with grommets. In her case she babbled, but only used limited sounds which was what made me wonder if something was up. Did you end up having your son's hearing checked? It might be a good first step at this stage.


 

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