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  1. #41
    bambino's Avatar
    bambino is offline Autistic Today, My Genius Tomorrow
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    Boston Terrier.

    They are small in size. Short hair. Doesn't shed. Great with kids. Very cute too.

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    Witwicky  (09-07-2012)

  3. #42
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    ToughLove is offline Meaner than a junkyard dog
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    Pedigrees are the healthiest out of any of the 'options'.

    Purebreds being the unhealthiest, followed by mongrels {but only for the first generation}

    There's a wealth of difference between a purebred and a pedigree purebred. You can buy a purebred from a pet shop, online, the side of the road. It simply means the parents were the same breed.
    Pedigreed purebreds are from papered, registered parents from registered breeders, who follow a set guide line on health and welfare in their dogs.

    Normal purebreds can suffer a huge range of health issues, as the breeders of them wouldn't bother to do any genetic testing, nor would they hold back putting two unhealthy dogs together.
    Crossbreds suffer less, but still to a high degree. This is because, for example, mixing a Poodle with VwD and a Lab with hip dysplasia isn't going to breed super puppies with bulletproof immune systems, like Don Burke constantly trots out. It's going to breed puppies with raised chances of acquiring both disorders.

    Buying from a pedigree breeder doesn't guarantee the pup won't get health problems. However, it does guarantee that it has less of a chance of getting them, and you can see several decade's worth of health records from those lines, the percentage of issues with the parents, and you can make an informed decision.
    We wouldn't spend thousands on genetic testing if it had no point.

    Try asking the Pet's Paradise assistant about the hip screen scores of the parents of the puppy in the window. They don't know, they don't even know what breed it is, nor do they know what conditions it came from. That's a huge risk to take, even if you look at it from a purely financial point of view.

    Guess how much it costs to do a double hip replacement on a dog, compared to spending $500 extra on a pup whose parents and grandparents are 0/0 clear for hips?
    There's a saying in the show world- you can't buy a Lamborghini at a used car lot, and you can't buy a quality dog from a backyard breeder.

    You pay for what you get- the cost is not just food for the growing litter.

    It's the tests on the parents, and xrays alone cost hundreds. It's the fee for the stud paid to the other breeder. The fees for show entries and registration fees in order for your dog to even be proved it has the necessary quality to breed.
    If you need to use AI from an import; that's sperm extraction fees, freezing fees, transportation, then the vet needs to impregnante the female, ultrasounds every second week to check for pregnancy, then weekly vet visits in the pregnancy, then the litters is born, after you've spent thousands already.
    Then you raise the puppies, paying for a temperament tester to rate them. You pay for weekly vet visits. Vaccinations, desexing, microchipping, registration, papers registration and printing, worming, flea treatments, insurance, grooming, toys, and advertising fees from the breed club.
    The pup is already worth about $7000, and you sell it for $1500.
    We don't make money from breeding; we don't even make back half of what we spend!


    You only specified non-shedding {of course if you're allergic to dogs, non shedding won't help. You're not allergic to the fur}, so off the top of my head:

    Small:
    * Shih Tzu
    * Maltese {no, they're not a terrier, and there is no such breed as a Maltese Shihtzu}
    * Dachshund
    * Poodle
    -Toy
    -Miniature
    * Norfolk Terrier:
    * Havanese
    * Welsh Terrier
    * Australian Terrier
    * Scottish Terrier
    * Yorkshire Terrier
    * West Highland
    * Bichon Frise
    * Italian Greyhound
    * Cairn Terrier
    * Schnauzer, Miniature
    * Silky Terrier
    * Boston Terrier
    * Chinese Crested
    * Affenpinscher
    * Brussels Griffon
    * Cesky Terrier
    * Bouvier des Flandres
    * Dinmont Terrier
    * Glen of Ismaal {don't think there's any Vic breeders, though}
    * Lowchen

    Large:

    * Poodle
    -Standard
    * Airedale
    * Wirehaired Fox Terrier
    * Bedlington Terrier
    * Soft Coated Wheaten
    * Basenji
    * Kerry Blue
    * Greyhound
    * Irish Water Spaniel
    * Xoloitzcuintle {although good luck with this one, there's only one breeder}

    If you specify what state you're in I can also link you to a list of registered breeders of those breeds in your state.

    Your best bet, of course, is to go to either an all breeds show or a breed club open day.
    That way you meet adults, pups, youths, and elderly members of hundreds of different breeds. The breeders are happy to talk to you about health, care and welfare, and show you their dogs. You can touch and play with them, and see what suits you. You might even find a breed that you never would have considered and absolutely fall in love!
    DH did this, he's a Neo mastiff man and always has been. Came with my family to a show, and suddenly- his all-time favourite breed is the English Toy Terrier.

  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to ToughLove For This Useful Post:

    CMF  (09-07-2012),Lillynix  (09-07-2012),Miss Moppet  (10-07-2012),Witwicky  (09-07-2012)

  5. #43
    Witwicky's Avatar
    Witwicky is offline A closed mouth gathers no foot.
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    Thanks heaps for your response. We are only looking at registered breeders, I would never purchase an animal from a pet shop or the like. The Viszlas are more expensive than other breeds we are looking at though (upwards of $2500 and we have put aside $1500-$2000). I have been having a look at registered breeders listed on Dogzonline - is this a reputable site?

    I am in love with Weimaraners, but not sure on the shedding. I'll do a bit of research on the list above Cheers

    ETA: Ignore the prices above, turns out we were misquoted on the Viszla.
    Last edited by Witwicky; 09-07-2012 at 15:46.

  6. #44
    Witwicky's Avatar
    Witwicky is offline A closed mouth gathers no foot.
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    Also, are there specific reasons to have a male or a female? I don't mind either way, but just wondering what the reasoning is behind picking the sex for a family dog.

  7. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Witwicky View Post
    Also, are there specific reasons to have a male or a female? I don't mind either way, but just wondering what the reasoning is behind picking the sex for a family dog.
    DD wanted a girl, so that's what we got

  8. #46
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    Dogzonline is a good site, yes. Join the forum if you can, they have a breed sub-forum that is like an online group for each breed. They have a Vizsla one here: http://www.dolforums.com.au/topic/10...arian-vizslas/
    Very helpful info, you can ask any questions you like and get an answer from owners, breeders and exhibitors.

    If you have a particular breed in mind, also get in contact with the breed club for your state {simple Google, for example, 'Hungarian Vizsla Club Victoria'} and call or email them.
    They have all the registered breeders for that breed in a list, and can also tell you more detailed information like which breeders do hip screening, which breeders have children, or tell you which breeders welcome visitors to their home. I know the Great Dane club have a list of every breeder who has bred dogs that have reached the age of 10, so you can narrow down a longer lived pup.

    They also hold an annual open days, which are so much fun. All the breeders attend, with their dogs, and they have a sausage sizzle and games and stuff. It's a great opportunity to bring your kids along and really interact with the dogs. It acts like a socialisation event as well, with young pups learning how to be calm and quiet in a crowd.

    Male or female is personal preference. I do better with males; I just bond with them easier. In some breeds males are more headstrong and confident, in other breeds it's females. Mostly it's size differences that people go for.
    In my own breed, male Danes get quite a bit heavier and taller, same with the Wolfhounds.

    If you're going for a Vizsla, that's a great breed. Very energetic, though, so be sure you're able to exercise every day.
    They're easily trained, very clever and very family orientated. They can tend to be a one-person dog, but the ones I've met are happy to be with anyone.
    I trained one to unpack shopping bags. He picked it up incredibly quickly, only taking two days to learn what shelves which products went on. Very smart and eager to please.

    If you choose a breeder you like the sound of, you can always ask if they do a payment plan on a future pup. That means you sign a contract and pay them gradually for the full price of a pup. If you have a particular preference for personality, size, gender or colour, once that pup is born, it is automatically reserved for you. Your money and rights are protected with the contract; if anything happens you get it back.
    Not all breeders do it, but you can always ask.


 

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