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  1. #11
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    i would ring the school and speak with the teacher in question, explaining the serious mistake, and follow this up with a written letter to the "normal" teacher and the principle.

    They are just very lucky at this stage it was not an anaphalatic reaction, and as teachers who parents trust with their child's safety they should have followed their normal procedures to ensure this didnt happen. Certaily doesn't give you much confidence in their abilities

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    Sorry - but this is just *not* true, not everyone reacts the same way to gluten. My reaction is in the life threatening emergency category. I hate how everyone just assumes that everyone just gets a few cramps and a bit of a vomit. It is not the same for everyone. It is rare, but it doesn't mean that it doesn't happen.
    I wasn't saying anything about gluten in particular, I was just saying that if the OPs child *or* mine are given an 'allergic' substance it does not put their lives in danger. That is the mindset *I* have adopted to cope with the times that people give *my* child something she cannot eat.

    Anyway my remarks were obviously not helpful so I'll just bow out of the conversation.

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    Mrs TW, I get what you mean. It would be AWFUL sending your anaphylactic child off to school and worrying if you would get a phone call

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    That is not what you said.
    What you said is this;

    "However it is not effectively the same thing as giving nuts to an anaphylactic child. That is potentially life threatening, and while i know how frustrating a setback like this is, I don't think its right to compare it to anaphylaxis, the consequences are just not the same "

    And it in your case, that may be the truth - but it is not the case with everyone who has coeliac etc, some have severe, life threatening reactions. I wasn't haven't a go at you, but rather the assumption that coeliac/gluten intolerance is annoying more than anything. I was merely pointing out that it can indeed be life threatening.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrsTiggyWinkle View Post
    I wasn't saying anything about gluten in particular, I was just saying that if the OPs child *or* mine are given an 'allergic' substance it does not put their lives in danger. That is the mindset *I* have adopted to cope with the times that people give *my* child something she cannot eat.

    Anyway my remarks were obviously not helpful so I'll just bow out of the conversation.

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    I agree MTW. There is a big difference to a child eating something they may be intolerant to and eating nuts around someone who has anaphylactic reactions to them.

    I do see your frustration though OP. I would definitely be following it up, sounds like a lack of communication between teachers.

    Also as far as I was aware aren't you meant to have permission before feeding anything to a child in school?
    I'm not sure how different preschools are to primary in that regard but if my DD's preschool provide any food other than what has been sent with them (for example they have pizza or flavored milk days) then they send home permission notes to be signed first.

  8. #16
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    I understand the frustration, but try and approach the school in a calm manner and find out what exactly she was given to eat and why her intolerances were ignored. It may be that they gave your daughter something similar to damper but GF, however still called it damper in order to not single out your daughter for being different.

    Mostly likely not the case, but you are likely to get further with your enquiries if you take a friendly approach rather than an angry 'how dare you' approach - the will automatically have the teachers being defensive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brooke88(mum2b09) View Post
    I agree MTW. There is a big difference to a child eating something they may be intolerant to and eating nuts around someone who has anaphylactic reactions to them.

    I do see your frustration though OP. I would definitely be following it up, sounds like a lack of communication between teachers.

    Also as far as I was aware aren't you meant to have permission before feeding anything to a child in school?
    I'm not sure how different preschools are to primary in that regard but if my DD's preschool provide any food other than what has been sent with them (for example they have pizza or flavored milk days) then they send home permission notes to be signed first.
    At DD1's primary school (state) they frequently do cooking, make pizzas, sandwiches etc to learn more about healthy eating. No nuts of any kind but I've never signed a permission slip that I recall. It might be in their policy and if you have any issues with your child you let them know. School is very different to childcare and kindy in so many ways.

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    I'm surprised your dr told you to cut out gluten in the first place? I have celiac disease and I was encourage to keep a steady amount of gluten in my diet (a specific, set amount) in the 4 weeks leading up to the blood test. Then they test bloods then if they come back with positive markers, then come the more invasive tests.

    Your dr has just slowed down the entire process if she does have celiac disease.

    But yes, I'd be annoyed if a school teacher went against my childs dietary needs.

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    Most allergy children I know, mine included, have a Dr fill in an allergy and/or anaphalysis (sp?) plan for the school. At the very least an action plan based on school policy. I think you should talk to the principal about what their policies and procedures are so that you know where the potential downfalls are and also how this occurred. There should be policy in place that ensures anyone going into your childs class knows what could potentially happen if your child encounters their allergen. Unfortunately, like others have said, this will be something that you will encounter a lot and your best advocate is your child themselves. Teach her to ask "does this have gluten?" and if in doubt dont eat. Its not worth it. My 4 year old will ask "does this have wheat?", he also wears an allergy band to his daycare that shows clearly all his major allergens and he can and does show people, effectively helping himself. We had a steep learning curve where his old centre gave him Wheat bix, then proceeded to tell me its okay, he didnt react. He was screaming in pain and constipated again that night. All allergies and intolerances should be taken and treated seriously, yes some will kill, but those children who aren't as severe should never be treated as anything less than seriously as no child deserves to suffer because of someone else's complacency.

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  16. #20
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    'Intolerance' is a relatively mild word so the teacher probably didn't take it as seriously as you would have liked her to. Yes, every request by a parent should be noted and followed to a tee but teachers err... (25 little ones in a class is tough!) So I wouldn't be as mad as all that.
    Just see the teacher or principal if u prefer and make a complaint and stress how important it is that your requests be heard and followed.
    I'm a teacher so generally see it from the other side...


 

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