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  1. #261
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I had to pay for my tube of lansinoh!
    yep free for me lol I don't think you should have had to pay for something to maintain a bfing relationship

    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I've heard that in some middle eastern countries formula is kept under lock and key and is available with a doctors prescription only.
    Well thank god that's not here. I put this in the category of banning abortion. The reasons women formula feed are complex. That thread has been done a few times and always ends badly lol there are logistical issues like what a woman does at 10pm with no milk, a screaming hungry baby and no chemist open. Then there's the issue of bodily autonomy.... I'll stop there before I starting foaming at the mouth lol

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    The problem is with this, how do we define need? What about someone like my cousin who had 2 children, failed badly bfing and got really depressed. For her 3 rd she decided she was use formula from the beginning and as I said, yes she probably should of provided her own (not sure if she did or not) but if she didn't?

    Is the answer to lock up the feeding room to those that don't have 'valid' issues and it's only unlocked for 'deserving' mums with issues the staff deem as good enough?

    We are getting into dangerous territory there.
    So you disagree with current policy? It's not under lock and key, but there is a chemist in the hospital where formula is supplied. If they are not going to bf, a supply will be given until they can get hold of some. Babies are not left to starve. I was first pregnant in 2002 and the policy was around then. Why the sudden defiance?

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to share a book For This Useful Post:

    VicPark  (23-06-2012)

  4. #263
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    yep free for me lol I don't think you should have had to pay for something to maintain a bfing relationship



    Well thank god that's not here. I put this in the category of banning abortion. The reasons women formula feed are complex. That thread has been done a few times and always ends badly lol there are logistical issues like what a woman does at 10pm with no milk, a screaming hungry baby and no chemist open. Then there's the issue of bodily autonomy.... I'll stop there before I starting foaming at the mouth lol
    With the lock and key thing that was in hospital only where staff were available to give a prescription at all hours. I agree totally unworkable if it's in the wider society.

  5. #264
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    What's so funny? That one expects parents to pay to feed their kids?
    I'm sorry that made me laugh again.

    You suggested going to c'link for the money for formula - you do realise omigosh it's tax payers dollars again for the formula.

    Also I forgot nappy wipes like a total rookie and the nurses were kind enough to give me a packet. Should the Australian government now pursue court action against me to get back their $2 for the nappy wipes. Should I have ran out across the road to the store with my few hour old baby to buy wipes?

    The average hospital stay is 24-48 hours? someone else said 94% of mothers in aus breast feed when they are discharged. Most formula is free to the hospital.

    But if your aching so badly as a tax payer I'll chuck you the $0.004 it's cost you will you take paypal ?



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    delirium  (23-06-2012),Guest654  (23-06-2012)

  7. #265
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    To vic park
    PLEASE don't take this as an attack. It's purely a few questions As I've seen in a few threads you are not happy with how tax money is spent.

    What Makes you so concerned about how tax payers money is spent.?
    And
    What is it that you want the government to spend the tax payers money on?

  8. #266
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    Quote Originally Posted by share a book View Post
    So you disagree with current policy? It's not under lock and key, but there is a chemist in the hospital where formula is supplied. If they are not going to bf, a supply will be given until they can get hold of some. Babies are not left to starve. I was first pregnant in 2002 and the policy was around then. Why the sudden defiance?
    Not in NSW. I had my babies in 04 and 07. In 04 it was a big regional hospital. There was a feeding room with about 6 electric breast pumps which I used. then a little room to the side with about 10 different types of formula and sterile, disposible bottles. There was no thing about a chemist, having to provide your own.

    In 07 I gave birth in another hospital where they had premade S26 glass bottles. I was comp feeding with EBM and formula as in the first few days my milk was slow to come in from the c/s.

    So no, not policy here.

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    I really doubt or hospitals would be able to afford formula, formula companies would supply the formula (which I have moral objections to there, not the women who need it for their babies).

    I remember supplying everything when I had DS, apart from a sample tube of J&J baby wash that I didn't use. I dare say Lansinoh would supply the lanolin....that's just at a guess.

    It wouldn't be a burden on the poor hard done by taxpayer at all.

    Agree with delirium that LCs and real help is needed for women who want to continue breastfeeding.

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    Annabella  (23-06-2012),delirium  (23-06-2012)

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Not in NSW. I had my babies in 04 and 07. In 04 it was a big regional hospital. There was a feeding room with about 6 electric breast pumps which I used. then a little room to the side with about 10 different types of formula and sterile, disposible bottles. There was no thing about a chemist, having to provide your own.

    In 07 I gave birth in another hospital where they had premade S26 glass bottles. I was comp feeding with EBM and formula as in the first few days my milk was slow to come in from the c/s.

    So no, not policy here.
    We have one of the leading maternity hospitals. It has been policy for a long time with no issue at all. People have options. If you intend to bf, then something goes wrong, enough is supplied to get you through until you buy some. If you intend to ff then you supply it. There is no anti formula policy where formula is banned. That would cause issues. It's just a given here that formula is available as a back up only, but the expectation is that parents supply it.

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    VicPark  (23-06-2012)

  13. #269
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    The problem is with this, how do we define need? What about someone like my cousin who had 2 children, failed badly bfing and got really depressed. For her 3 rd she decided she was use formula from the beginning and as I said, yes she probably should of provided her own (not sure if she did or not) but if she didn't?

    Is the answer to lock up the feeding room to those that don't have 'valid' issues and it's only unlocked for 'deserving' mums with issues the staff deem as good enough?

    We are getting into dangerous territory there.
    No no! You misunderstod me! I think it should be as it is already- it SHOULD be available for people that unexpectedly need it until they can organise their own. And I realise for some women they won't be able to organise their own before leaving hospital and this doesn't bother me, but shouldn't be advertised iykwim?

    When I say 'need', I mean self-defined need, which is pretty much as it is now as well. If a woman is having attachment issues (a pretty common reason for switching to formula I'd imagine), she should have access to all the support and info available to encourage her to continue bf, but if she decides its just too much, the formula should be available to her til she organises something.

    Where I had my last baby they had a room for formula and EBM, with a fridge, bottles, sterilising equipment, sink etc. It was open and available to everyone but (from memory) all milk (formula and EBM) had to be signed out by the mother and a midwife. If a mother expressed that she didn't want to continue with bf, she was shown this room, and where things were, how to prepare bottles, where to keep her formula when she bought it etc, but this room was not really 'advertised' if you know what I mean, it was on a needs-to-know- basis which is what I mean by I agree with it not being 'right there'. If there was a room that everyone was shown, with free access to help-yourself formula, bottles etc, I can imagine less women would persevere when bf gets hard.

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  15. #270
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    I have been trying to keep up with this thread all day but it keeps moving.

    Interesting reading over the course of the 20 odd pages. First pp'ing accuse the midwives of all being bf'ing nazis who hate formula and would let babies starve rather than give the stuff out, then the posts turn around and the midwives are forcing formula on mums left right and centre,

    All I know if I wouldn't be a midwife for all the money in the world. My mother is one, as is one of my closest friends, and they are incredibly tolerant of mothers' choices, but are also incredibly over worked and understaffed.

    FWIW I think formula should be supplied by all hospitals if necessary or the mother asks for it (so long as there is a full discussion on the topic with the parents). I would think the number of women who attend a public hospital and ff from birth and don't come prepared would be so minor as to be inconsequential.

    The baby friendly health initiative guidelines here in WA make obtaining formula so difficult in hospital I think this is a complete non-issue here

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