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  1. #121
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    i had every intention to bf my twins but due to bubs needing special care at birth my milk did not come in fast enough nor was i making enough so the hospital gave formula...would you prefer they starve them i was unable to leave the hospital to buy formula so i used what hospital had then switched to formula of choice when home.
    having babes in nicu and scu the hospital also supplied nappies and wipes and everything else that was needed as it is easier for them and when we left we took home all the leftover supplies as the nurse said if we didn't they would just get thrown away due to hygiene and safety.
    you can't discriminate on who gets/doesn't get the free formula and i think choosing to ff in hospital is a lot harder than bf..believe me the amount of tears i shed due to the pressure i was getting to bf was enough to fill a lake. sometimes what we wish to do and what actually happens are two different things.

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  3. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlissedOut View Post
    Pumps are supplied at our hospital.

    The problem with asking patients to supply their own is the hospital then has to provide facilities to clean, sterilize and prepare bottles. If the mother has had a c-section they have to find someone to do it for her as she's immobile(husbands are kicked out at 9pm at our hospital).

    Much more hassle for busy staff than supplying premixed formula.
    The hospital I had both my children had a room with bottle warmers, sterilizers, sterile water etc.

  4. #123
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    Zombie_eyes is offline Formerly Diamondeyes
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    Havent read the replies.

    If u plan on bottle feeding from the very start, you should supply the stuff yourself.

    If u try to breast and cant or decide its too difficult or whatevs and its the middle of the night, then i think the hospital should provide you with enough to get you through until a relative can bring you what you need

    This is how it worked at my hospital, they supply 24 hours worth of bottles and formula, then u are on your own. But they make it quite clear if your going to bottle feed from the start, bring your own.
    Last edited by Zombie_eyes; 23-06-2012 at 14:39.

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  6. #124
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    I guess it isn't something that is ever really going to happen though, no hospital in this country is going to go "oh sorry but we don't have any formula, your baby will have to starve"

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  8. #125
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    hospitals provide food for mothers? shouldn't babies entitled the same rights?

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  9. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by bumMum View Post
    Why is it disgusting?
    Have you read the thread and the comment about it being like buying patients cigarettes for them?

    Once hospitals start asking patients to bring their own meals from home I'll agree that formula feeders should supply their own also. For now, hospitals feed their patients regular meals and I don't see why that's even debatable.

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  11. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I told myself I wouldn't reply again, (damn it popping up in new posts lol) but firstly I took nappies, creams, baby clothes, pads, despite the hospital providing them. This isn't about a sense of entitlement on my behalf.

    People keep saying if you don't plan to bf from day dot, what's the issue with paying yourself? In itself, that doesn't bother me. But people are also ignoring this scenario
    Mother A goes into hospital to have a baby. She plans to bf. Doesn't even buy bottles let alone formula to take. After a few days bfing is not what she expected. She hates it with a passion. So she decides to use formula. The problem is that she didn't bring cash (I didn't either with both my births as I'd heard stories of money going missing out of patients draws). She's single, no family near her. Not really any friends to bring her a tin of formula.

    Now I know people will say, invoice her, she can come in after discharge and pay. But should I have had to pay for the whole tube of lanisol I used trying to bf with my first? I know the response will be, that's ok bc bfing is better.

    But what message does that send? and this argument of choice can be applied to lots of 'choices' in a hospital. Charge the elective c/s for dressing bc she chose a c/s. Hit the lap band surgery person with all the cost in a pub hospital for the anesthetist. Overeating is a choice right? (and I know it's much more complex than that, but that's my whole point).

    The true proportion of women that choose to ff for no other reason than they don't want to while still in hospital is very small. I don't think a few bucks here and there will not matter.

    and with that, I'm out (really this time lol )
    Common sense is used in most public hospitals. With my son, who was premature, he had to be tube fed a few times and then I was encouraged to express and then to put him to the breast to encourage sucking etc however I found it quite overwhelming and difficult and didn't find it particularly bonding yet.. so then I told them I was feeling pretty fed up trying to feed him all day so they gave me bottles and taught me how to do it.. no they didn't charge me for it.. I thought the thread was specifically about people who plan to formula feed in advance. I don't know why you wouldn't take your own..

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  12. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiamondEyes View Post
    Havent read the replies.

    If u plan on bottle feeding from the very start, you should supply the stuff yourself.

    If u try to breast and cant or decide its too difficult or whatevs and its the middle of the nit, then i think the hospital shoukd provide you with enough to get you through until a relative can bring you what you need

    This is how it worked at my hospital, they supply 24 hours worth of bottles and formula, then u are on your own. But they make it quite clear if your going to bottle feed from the start, bring your own.
    Careful, you will be called a formula basher!

    Works that way here too, not sure what the issue is.

    If people or hospitals banned the use of formula, or suggested the should, that would be different.

  13. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlissedOut View Post
    Have you read the thread and the comment about it being like buying patients cigarettes for them?

    Once hospitals start asking patients to bring their own meals from home I'll agree that formula feeders should supply their own also. For now, hospitals feed their patients regular meals and I don't see why that's even debatable.
    My concern isnt that mums get free formula which is a tax burden or whatever was suggested.. that's silly to me.. but that formula is not actually breastfeeding friendly lol.. so in a public breastfeeding friendly hospital it would be counterproductive to give out formula.. I guess it would depend how its done.. if it was not "offered" on arrival but mums were informed that while breast is best if they make the informed choice to formula feed then it is available in room x and we will teach you how to use it correctly.. that would be okay. But I would be worried that some midwives would be too formula happy. I was determined to breastfeed my second child and still had a midwife suggest a formula top up because my baby was "too big" and needs more than.breastmilk. People can only make informed choices when they really know all the facts and are free of pressure. So telling people formula feeding is like giving your baby a cigarette is wrong in my opinion.. guilt is wrong.. not informing someone of how to best formula feed a baby is wrong. But routinely offering formula to New mums could easily become pressure to formula feed for some mums.

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  15. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by bumMum View Post
    My concern isnt that mums get free formula which is a tax burden or whatever was suggested.. that's silly to me.. but that formula is not actually breastfeeding friendly lol.. so in a public breastfeeding friendly hospital it would be counterproductive to give out formula.. I guess it would depend how its done.. if it was not "offered" on arrival but mums were informed that while breast is best if they make the informed choice to formula feed then it is available in room x and we will teach you how to use it correctly.. that would be okay. But I would be worried that some midwives would be too formula happy. I was determined to breastfeed my second child and still had a midwife suggest a formula top up because my baby was "too big" and needs more than.breastmilk. People can only make informed choices when they really know all the facts and are free of pressure. So telling people formula feeding is like giving your baby a cigarette is wrong in my opinion.. guilt is wrong.. not informing someone of how to best formula feed a baby is wrong. But routinely offering formula to New mums could easily become pressure to formula feed for some mums.
    I agree with all of the above and if a hospital was routinely offering formula I'd be horrified.

    I only knew our hospital does because I had to ask what I needed to supply, what facilities were available for feeding my child and who would do the preparation when I was there alone with my baby.

    Our local hospitals policy is that the MWs aren't allowed to offer formula, it has to be requested. It's definitely not advertised as being available either. Which is a policy I'm comfortable with.

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