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  1. #111
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    I was at private hospital which seems to be a bit different in what was supplied (they supplied nappies, wipes, creams etc) and they did have formula which I used twice to comp feed when I got so hysterical I physically couldn't go through the pain at that stage.

    I think hospitals should provide formula, it is a basic necessity and right to feed your child irrespective of your method. If you know by say day 2 that you are never going to go back to BF or you are sticking to FF then I think you it would be nice if you started to supply your own but not a necessity, but then I wouldn't ask for more cream after I ran out, I just used my own so that's more my nervousness of asking for things.

    I would think that a hospital is either getting formula free or paying pittance for it so does it really matter the cost. If taxpayers money is going towards feeding our children in whatever way that is (formula, lactation consultants, whatever) then it's money well spent.

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  3. #112
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    I had a great public hospital that supplied unlimited Huggies nappies, gowns, wraps, and pre-made bottles of formula (which I didn't require, but it was there).

    If I did intend to FF, I would have bought my own in just so I had continuity.

    Even as a breast feeder I still had all FFing equipment/supplies at home JIC they were needed.

    I don't care much for the argument, I guess whatever your hospital has as policy - that's what goes. So in some cases, FFers WILL need to bring in formula and that should be prepared for.

  4. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    I had DD 9 years ago in public Hosp. There was a lc on 7 days a week. That aside, it was an example to show their are costs for both. As I said.
    My dd is 9 in a few weeks too. Only twice a week. Only 2 in town with (at the time) 3 hospitals and a child health clinic.

  5. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Girl X View Post
    I don't think hospitals should provide pain relief to women in labour. It's their choice if they want it, and I think they should bring their own drugs.
    This is the perfect comparison - and this thread is disgusting.

    I know in our local hospital premixed formula in bottles are supplied by Nestle for FREE to the hospital. It saves the hospital money on having to provide facilities for bottle cleaning/sterilising and preparation.

    So it's CHEAPER than breastfeeding mums expense for their feeding choice. A breastfeeding mother may require a lactation consultant, staff resources from midwives and a hospital supplied pump which will then need sterilizing.

    Most hospital stays are in the range of 1-4 days, in that time a mother trying to breastfeed is unlikely to give up, it's the days when they leave hospital that it's proven a good percentage stop breastfeeding due to difficulties. So formula being on hand is hardly relevant.

    Brb, DD needs her cigarettes. Oh, I mean formula... meh same diff right?

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  7. #115
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    I told myself I wouldn't reply again, (damn it popping up in new posts lol) but firstly I took nappies, creams, baby clothes, pads, despite the hospital providing them. This isn't about a sense of entitlement on my behalf.

    People keep saying if you don't plan to bf from day dot, what's the issue with paying yourself? In itself, that doesn't bother me. But people are also ignoring this scenario
    Mother A goes into hospital to have a baby. She plans to bf. Doesn't even buy bottles let alone formula to take. After a few days bfing is not what she expected. She hates it with a passion. So she decides to use formula. The problem is that she didn't bring cash (I didn't either with both my births as I'd heard stories of money going missing out of patients draws). She's single, no family near her. Not really any friends to bring her a tin of formula.

    Now I know people will say, invoice her, she can come in after discharge and pay. But should I have had to pay for the whole tube of lanisol I used trying to bf with my first? I know the response will be, that's ok bc bfing is better.

    But what message does that send? and this argument of choice can be applied to lots of 'choices' in a hospital. Charge the elective c/s for dressing bc she chose a c/s. Hit the lap band surgery person with all the cost in a pub hospital for the anesthetist. Overeating is a choice right? (and I know it's much more complex than that, but that's my whole point).

    The true proportion of women that choose to ff for no other reason than they don't want to while still in hospital is very small. I don't think a few bucks here and there will not matter.

    and with that, I'm out (really this time lol )

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  9. #116
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    Our hospital provides it for those little emergencies, which is fair enough. But what's the problem with being prepared if you know you will ff from birth?

    Just saw the post above. No nipple cream/shields/pumps were supplied either.

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  11. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by share a book View Post
    Our hospital provides it for those little emergencies, which is fair enough. But what's the problem with being prepared if you know you will ff from birth?

    Just saw the post above. No nipple cream/shields/pumps were supplied either.
    Pumps are supplied at our hospital.

    The problem with asking patients to supply their own is the hospital then has to provide facilities to clean, sterilize and prepare bottles. If the mother has had a c-section they have to find someone to do it for her as she's immobile(husbands are kicked out at 9pm at our hospital).

    Much more hassle for busy staff than supplying premixed formula.

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    Why is it disgusting? I'm confused. Most public hospitals DO ask you to bring in a tin of formula if you plan to ff. So? It's better to stick to the same formula anyway.. for the babies tummy.. so why would you want to just use whatever the hospital has in the beginning. Surely you would have a formula preference? My son was formula fed from birth and mix fed there after.. it was my choice to continue the formula.. not medically necessary.. I don't see how the thread is attacking of formula feeding as a choice.

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  14. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlissedOut View Post
    This is the perfect comparison - and this thread is disgusting.

    I know in our local hospital premixed formula in bottles are supplied by Nestle for FREE to the hospital. It saves the hospital money on having to provide facilities for bottle cleaning/sterilising and preparation.

    So it's CHEAPER than breastfeeding mums expense for their feeding choice. A breastfeeding mother may require a lactation consultant, staff resources from midwives and a hospital supplied pump which will then need sterilizing.
    Like I said in another thread.............
    I'm actually amazed that there are hospitals that are endorsing a 'brand' of formula by accepting free samples to give to mothers, I thought that went out in the dark ages. That would go against the policy of most well known hospitals these days.

    I think if you go into hospital planning to formula feed you should go in prepared, if you have issues with breastfeeding and need that option it should be made available.

  15. #120
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    Pumps and formula are supplied for premmie bubs. It seemed no hassle for those who ff when dd was born. The maternity ward has a kitchen with a microwave. And washing machine for cloth nappies. Our hospital is of the belief that women in that ward are not there because they are sick or incapable of being self sufficient. They are there to have a baby. Those who are sick or injured as a result, or have a sick or injured baby, are not treated the same way. They require more care and assistance, which is fair. In those situations they are provided with more, which may include bottles and formula.


 

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