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  1. #91
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    Hospitals should absolutely have a supply of formula for when situations arise where a mother can't breastfeed.

    I had DD at 11.30am by caesarean and was back in surgery shortly after until nearly 8pm and in intensive care for a day. DH had to leave the hospital while I was in surgery, and drive around until he found some formula, he had no idea what to buy, what supplies he needed. What an awful situation to place a new father in while his wife is in surgery to save her life. Just because our hospital refused to supply formula.

    Of course we would have been happy to supply our own once the situation settled down and he could go out to get some the next day, but to not have an emergency supply of formula for situations like this was disgraceful.

    Looking back now we should have done some research into formula feeding before she was born, but you just don't think that these things happen to you.

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  3. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    So who should pay for lactation consultants etc provided for those needing help with BFing? Both types of feeding incur a cost at some level, the hospital receives funding to support patients. One type of feeding is not more valid than another.
    My opinion is that hospitals should promote breastfeeding as it is the healthiest option for most families. Part of that is lactation consultants. I don't think they should openly encourage formula by giving it out. My son was formula fed (prem) and they discuss it with you first before they do the formula feed. Obviously hospitals should have formula on hand and provide it for free when necessary as is already done.. but I don't think if somebody knows they are going to formula feed they should expect it to be paid for in a public hospital.
    What happens in private hospitals.. well who cares, they are paying a fortune to be there.
    Yes I am aware this post will be taken as some sort of attack on formula feeding. My son was formula fed. It's not an attack. I don't see why hospitals should give out formula when they are meant to be promoting breastmilk.
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    Annabella  (23-06-2012)

  5. #93
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    I think it should be as it is. Typically you are advised that it is recommended you bring formula with you if you know you will FF from dot, but not required. Similarly it is recommended you have a pack or two of maternity pads in your bag - I did, but I still used the hospital's ones (plus those weird stretchy disposable knickers) for the first few days because they were so huge they were great when bedridden! I think the hospital should provide all these things but if you are organised and in a financial position to do so, you should try to provide what you can - but not be made to feel guilty if you don't. We all pay tax (GST if nothing else).

    Since I know I may have trouble next time I will have formula in my bag, but only because DD didn't cope with any "gold" formulas so I'd want a specific type. I would use their bottles again as I would be too worried about trying to keep track of mine - especially teats which you can't really label.

    I needed to comp feed DD and the hospital having formula was a godsend for me. It was never "pushed" and I only knew they had it once I actually needed it.

    I was also given an extra plate of sandwiches each night and extra packet of biscuits with the comment "you're breastfeeding, you'll need these". IMO if you're going to bill for formula you should also bill for these "extras" (though my opinion is that neither should be billed of course!)

    Hang on, I just realised that I got extra food AND free formula/access to hosp bottle/microwave/sertiliser... oh I'm such a burden on society! Don't mention that I had a public D&C for my missed miscarriage when I could have "waited it out". Seriously, where does it end?

  6. #94
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    I am VERY pro bf (just want to state that up front) and have BF both my DDs.
    Of course the hospital should provide formula. If for what ever reason a Mum can't or doesn't want to bf (her decision and really it is no ones business except her and her partners) then of course she should have access to bottles and formula. I think hospitals should have a few different formulas available and then if you want some other type then parents should provide that.
    Both mother and baby should be provided with all their nutritional needs while in hospital.
    The decision not to BF whether from birth or later on is none of my business. I choose to do long term bf with my children and just as I do not wish to be judged about my decisions I will not judge others on how they feed their children.
    How other people choose to feed their babies is irrelevant to you and your family. Be happy with your own parenting decisions and let others do what they think are right too!!!

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  8. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Girl X View Post
    I went to a private hospital.

    However, my understanding is that a public hospital will supply tea or coffee. This is non-essential, as water is free.

    And people mentioned nappies earlier. Public hospitals may not supply disposables, but they still supply nappies, thereby meeting a basic need of the baby.

    If a woman deems that she cannot/ will not BF, then the hospital is not meeting the baby's needs if it doesn't supply food for him/her for the duration of the stay.

    To say that the mother 'should' be doing it, is to say that women are not capable of making their own decisions regarding their bodies.

    And that has knock-on implications for all kinds of other things affecting childbirth and parenting.
    No nappies were supplied for us. Other than the 2 samples. But there was also a formula sample and sample wipes and nappy cream. How is expecting a mother to provide for her baby taking away options?

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  10. #96
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    Following the logic of some in here I propose that all benefits be cut for those women (and only women because that is who is being attacked in this topic) who can, but choose not to work outside the home after child birth. I mean after all they are a burden on tax payers and they knowingly made the decision not to work.

    *shaking my head at the lack of logic and basic humanity I have read in this thread*
    Last edited by MsTruth; 23-06-2012 at 13:53.

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  12. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    I think it should be as it is. Typically you are advised that it is recommended you bring formula with you if you know you will FF from dot, but not required. Similarly it is recommended you have a pack or two of maternity pads in your bag - I did, but I still used the hospital's ones (plus those weird stretchy disposable knickers) for the first few days because they were so huge they were great when bedridden! I think the hospital should provide all these things but if you are organised and in a financial position to do so, you should try to provide what you can - but not be made to feel guilty if you don't. We all pay tax (GST if nothing else).

    Since I know I may have trouble next time I will have formula in my bag, but only because DD didn't cope with any "gold" formulas so I'd want a specific type. I would use their bottles again as I would be too worried about trying to keep track of mine - especially teats which you can't really label.

    I needed to comp feed DD and the hospital having formula was a godsend for me. It was never "pushed" and I only knew they had it once I actually needed it.

    I was also given an extra plate of sandwiches each night and extra packet of biscuits with the comment "you're breastfeeding, you'll need these". IMO if you're going to bill for formula you should also bill for these "extras" (though my opinion is that neither should be billed of course!)

    Hang on, I just realised that I got extra food AND free formula/access to hosp bottle/microwave/sertiliser... oh I'm such a burden on society! Don't mention that I had a public D&C for my missed miscarriage when I could have "waited it out". Seriously, where does it end?
    Agreed

  13. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by louellyn View Post
    Following the logic of some in here I propose that all benefits be cut for those women (and only women because that is who is being attacked in this topic) who can, but choose not to work outside the home art child birth. I mean after all they are a burden on tax payers and they knowingly made the decision not to work.

    *shaking my head at the lack of logic and basic humanity I have read in this post*
    That comparison makes no sense at all.

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  14. #99
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    well I was lucky..
    My hospy supplied, nappies ( sposies), Pads, creams, clothes for bub ( if needed) , formula, lactation consultant, bath classes, wipes, food for me, nipple shields, pumps, tea, coffee, biscuits..

    I am one lucky mumma.

  15. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by bumMum View Post
    My opinion is that hospitals should promote breastfeeding as it is the healthiest option for most families. Part of that is lactation consultants. I don't think they should openly encourage formula by giving it out. My son was formula fed (prem) and they discuss it with you first before they do the formula feed. Obviously hospitals should have formula on hand and provide it for free when necessary as is already done.. but I don't think if somebody knows they are going to formula feed they should expect it to be paid for in a public hospital.
    What happens in private hospitals.. well who cares, they are paying a fortune to be there.
    Yes I am aware this post will be taken as some sort of attack on formula feeding. My son was formula fed. It's not an attack. I don't see why hospitals should give out formula when they are meant to be promoting breastmilk.
    Sent from my HTC Desire S using BubHub
    No one has suggested hospitals should give out formula or promote it, just to have it available. My example of a lc was meant to illustrate that those arguing that the cost of formula was a reason hospys should not provide it were erroneous in their reasoning as even BF has a cost.


 

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