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  1. #461
    headoverfeet's Avatar
    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrena View Post
    Here is another article which I think is essential reading for all women interested in birth

    http://www.theatlantic.com/health/ar...-birth/254420/


    Reminds me of this clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arCIT...e_gdata_player
    Last edited by headoverfeet; 19-06-2012 at 19:29.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lily of the Nile View Post
    Public hospitals are teaching hospitals. When I had my appointments with the dr's I'd ask them if they're ob's and no not one of them was. The anaesthetist told me they're all residents and if I was to need a c/s or wanted an epi a resident would be doing that too. That is not years of experience in my eyes.
    You have to pay if you want a highly skilled and trained obstetrician to attend your birth in a private hospital. They're not all walking around the public hospitals and are waiting in the hallways while you're in labour. Again, false sense of security there, if they're so necessary and required, they'd be free and available at public hospitals. You would never see an ob at a public hospital appointment unless you were very high risk, otherwise, midwives look after you during pregnancy, delivery and post care. Ob's play little part, they're necessary for surgery and to manage high risk cases but in a normal, low risk birth, completely uneccessary. The public hospital system agrees obviously, I was suprsied to see the difference in my first private ob experience, to the public system.
    Yes most of the docs you saw were registrars/residents whatever you want to call them. Still years of experience. And yes, there are always consultant obs on call for if the worst happens. On site during the day and remote call at night.

    I agree that an ob isn't necessary during a normal natural birth. But for people to say that an ob, or a registrar isn't as experienced as a midwife is just wrong. Sorry

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4underfour View Post
    If something goes wrong, even if the midwife has been there for 12 hours and the obs for 1 hour, it is always the doctors responsibility. They are the ones that will get sued. Do you know that even if a mother insists on going against docs advice, then the worst happens, the mother can and sometimes does sue the doctor anyway? "I was in pain, I wasn't thinking straight" "you should have insisted" they can say.
    In my hometown a mother is suing the local hospital/doctors because her baby tragically died during birth. The woman was having a vbac after 2 c-sections. Doctors advised against it, but she refused a csec. She went into labor naturally, was again advised that a csec was needed due to her specific circumstances but refused to sign the paperwork for a csec. She unfortunately hit difficulties and doctors had to choose between her and bubba. Bubba died.

    I think it's extreme cases like this that Mia was having a go at in her article. Women that have a plan but have blinkers on and won't listen to medical professionals outlining real risks. They think they know best when they don't, Their 'plan' is at the front of their mind rather than the end goal of having a healthy bubba.

    ITs going to sound harsh but in this case instead of suing the hospital the mother should look in the mirror.

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    hopefully2  (19-06-2012)

  5. #464
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    And thankyou vicpark, this is why some doctors are scared. They are human! A case like this could ruin their career and their lives.

    Sorry but midwives are not accountable for problems happening during birth. I would like to see how they changed if they were held as accountable as doctors are.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lily of the Nile View Post
    Public hospitals are teaching hospitals. When I had my appointments with the dr's I'd ask them if they're ob's and no not one of them was. The anaesthetist told me they're all residents and if I was to need a c/s or wanted an epi a resident would be doing that too. That is not years of experience in my eyes.
    You have to pay if you want a highly skilled and trained obstetrician to attend your birth in a private hospital. They're not all walking around the public hospitals and are waiting in the hallways while you're in labour. Again, false sense of security there, if they're so necessary and required, they'd be free and available at public hospitals. You would never see an ob at a public hospital appointment unless you were very high risk, otherwise, midwives look after you during pregnancy, delivery and post care. Ob's play little part, they're necessary for surgery and to manage high risk cases but in a normal, low risk birth, completely uneccessary. The public hospital system agrees obviously, I was suprsied to see the difference in my first private ob experience, to the public system.
    Obviously you have no idea how much training is involved to become a consultant

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    hopefully2  (19-06-2012)

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    Once again VBACers, homebirthers and those with a birth plan are under attack.

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    Quote Originally Posted by share a book View Post
    Once again VBACers, homebirthers and those with a birth plan are under attack.
    The only people I can see continuously attacked throughout this thread are doctors and hospitals. Eeeeevviiiillll!

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    chickenfoot83  (20-06-2012)

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    How is it under attack! Surely you can see that sometimes people really do make the wrong choice. It doesn't mean that all vabcers, HBers etc are under attack - just the few that are so hardline.

    Seriously = and this is a very serious question to homebirthers and it isn't an attack, I am interested. If you were considered high risk - and no, I don't mean VBAC, I mean really high risk. Placenta previa or multiple pregnancy or whatever - would you really continue with a homebirth even though homebirth advocates don't recommend in these situations?

    I can totally understand why women choose homebirth - sounds great. But it is this blinkered "can only be one way at all costs" attitude that I don't understand.

    I was scared out of my mind having to have an elective (though medically needed) c/section. I didn't choose it, I didn't want it. But I had a 31% chance of one of my babies dying (read loads and loads of studies on pubmed and that seems to be the most common percent that came up) there was no way I would have a VB if the risk was that high.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmyB View Post
    The only people I can see continuously attacked throughout this thread are doctors and hospitals. Eeeeevviiiillll!
    Oh no, don't forget main****** people!

    So many of you are getting so angry and defensive regarding homebirth haters, VBAC haters. But the vast majority of us main****** birthers are saying they couldn't care less how anyone else births.
    Some of us are saying we don't support high risk home or free births and I stand by that.

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    Alimia  (20-06-2012),Artful  (19-06-2012),beebs  (19-06-2012),Guest654  (19-06-2012),Ulysses  (19-06-2012),VicPark  (19-06-2012)

  16. #470
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    By the way, I support homebirth and may have one for number 6. I have had 5 natural deliveries, including twins. All by an ob at a hospital. My last 2 births I refused continuous monitoring and internals. Also refused membrane rupture. All of which my ob was happy with. My last baby was big, 4.4 kg and had shoulder dystocia. My obs delivered her with no tearing or episi.
    So I guess I'm not too main****** after all.....


 

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