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  1. #431
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    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    Well, okay - so it goes wrong and the worst happens and then what? We are supposed to hold their hand, say how awful it must be, offer sympathy? Even thought hey could have prevented it all because they knew they were high risk. I'm talking the high risk where ever homebirth advocates don't recommend homebirth in that situation..
    If something went wrong in a low risk homebirth would you hold the mothers hand ect? I dont see the difference.

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  3. #432
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    I'd told myself I wouldn't reply again lol... but my ob left huge bits out of my medical records. It says a spinal then a general, but conveniently omits why I had the GA - inadequate anesthesia. Covering the anesth. I guess. Although he records only partial placenta removal, mind you no one told me this and I thought it was normal for a c/s to pass bits of tissue for 10 weeks

    Everyone keeps saying trust the med pros, you aren't a dr or a middie or an ob. What people don't understand is that many suffered at the hands of these pros. We did trust them and look where it got us....

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    Speaking of paeds in birth... my daughter was born not breathing (the result of being delivered via a caesarean and not having her lungs compressed via the birth canal). For 11 minutes she didn't take a breath.

    The paed was called. Called again. Called again.

    10 minutes after my daughter started breathing on her own, the paed finally showed up. Yes, 21 minutes after her delivery. Luckily, she was alive and well at that point... no thanks to him.

    Do I think paeds are necessary in birth? No way. In our case, the only reason the paed was called was because of the caesarean delivery. If she had been born naturally, that issue would have been unlikely to have arisen in the first place.

    I also trust that one midwife of my choosing, who understand my ideaology around birth and has come to know me as a person too, who is attending ONLY to me and not 10 other women, who spends all my labour in the same room as me, is going to be more likely to catch any issues than a team of random midwifes who don't know me from a bar of soap, who may switch over and be replaced with other midwives who don't know me, who flit in and out randomly, with other women on their mind too... surely if I'm going to show the signs of uterine rupture (my biggest issue being a VBAC), the one midwife focused solely on me is going to pick it up quicker and deal with it sooner. Sure, that means a trip to the hospital... 10 minutes up the road. I do suspect it'd take more than 10 minutes for the hospital midwives to recognise the signs of uterine rupture in hospital, since they may leave me alone for lengthy periods of time anyway.

    Some women just feel safer at home. It's not just about the homely surroundings - I could personally give or take that. I don't care about that. It's about what's safe for me and my baby. For me, I believe that's at home.

    Neither Mia Freedman or anyone else has the right to tell me I'm wrong.

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  7. #434
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    Well, okay - so it goes wrong and the worst happens and then what? We are supposed to hold their hand, say how awful it must be, offer sympathy? Even thought hey could have prevented it all because they knew they were high risk. I'm talking the high risk where ever homebirth advocates don't recommend homebirth in that situation..
    Simply, yes what else are you going to do? Sit back and scorn her, tell her she deserved a dead baby?
    Last edited by headoverfeet; 19-06-2012 at 16:33.

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I'd told myself I wouldn't reply again lol... but my ob left huge bits out of my medical records. It says a spinal then a general, but conveniently omits why I had the GA - inadequate anesthesia. Covering the anesth. I guess. Although he records only partial placenta removal, mind you no one told me this and I thought it was normal for a c/s to pass bits of tissue for 10 weeks

    Everyone keeps saying trust the med pros, you aren't a dr or a middie or an ob. What people don't understand is that many suffered at the hands of these pros. We did trust them and look where it got us....
    Yep, massive amounts of pages are gone from my nephew's file. It still has the page that outlines that she was induced, that she failed in labour and had to have a caesarian but it doesn't have all the more detailed pages that my nephew's new doctor saw that showed there was no medical reason to be induced, and the "failed labour" was because they didn't want to wait any longer, sheesh it was 2 hours!

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    This is so full on I've never heard of this before but as I'm delivering in December I'm glad to read about it now and not be so nieve.

    Were your records accurate leading up to delivery?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roopee View Post
    A lot of newly enrolled student midwives are not studying nursing- we're studying midwifery. Two very different and valuable professions and degrees.
    Yes, I have seen a baby born not breathing- I've seen a few babies born this way. Including my own. My third child was born 'flat', with an apgar of 3. And needing to be resussed. Thank god the midwives knew what they were doing because they, and their infant resuss skills are probably what saved her life.
    I'm not saying doctors don't have a role, that wouldn't exactly be very smart- of course they do- but at a normal, low risk birth midwives are more than qualified for childbirth. W
    What I'm getting at is that homebirth,with a qualified midwife, for normal, low risk pregnancies is a safe and valid OPTION for women. A sentiment the author of this 'article' does not subscribe to.
    And how long does midwifery take to complete at uni??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roopee View Post
    A lot of newly enrolled student midwives are not studying nursing- we're studying midwifery. Two very different and valuable professions and degrees.
    Yes, I have seen a baby born not breathing- I've seen a few babies born this way. Including my own. My third child was born 'flat', with an apgar of 3. And needing to be resussed. Thank god the midwives knew what they were doing because they, and their infant resuss skills are probably what saved her life.
    I'm not saying doctors don't have a role, that wouldn't exactly be very smart- of course they do- but at a normal, low risk birth midwives are more than qualified for childbirth. W
    What I'm getting at is that homebirth,with a qualified midwife, for normal, low risk pregnancies is a safe and valid OPTION for women. A sentiment the author of this 'article' does not subscribe to.
    I don't think you get my point, even the most low risk pregancies can still have complications. I just know I would want as many experienced people around as possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nat11 View Post
    Mine were also falsified. There are huge chunks of events missing and inconsistencies everywhere. They said I consented to everything and I did to nothing. They went against my wishes knowingly and there is nothing in there to back that up. Same with DS NICU reports. It's disgusting.

    Eta, I also found out that I tested positive to an infection in the placenta through my new OB. Strangely enough I was told that the test came back negative and this is also on my copy of the report. It was likely the cause of DS prem birth and something, had I known, that could have saved me 14 months of night terrors about having another prem.


 

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