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  1. #341
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    I don't find reasons to argue with you Hopefully2, don't be so arrogant as to think your opinion is THAT important to me. It's not.

  2. #342
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thermolicious View Post
    Of course they are, but are they investigated by the coroner or within the confines of the hospital? I'd be interested to hear what happens when a baby dies in hospital and how they investigate it?

    *genuine question!*
    Yes and yes. Ok I will give the shortest answer possible. So the clinical governance team are notified of the death. An incident form is filled out. The death is placed on a specific database. The risk manager then has a case review with the relevant parties involved in the care of the patient to determine what/if anything went wrong, how it could have been managed better, what processes need to be put in place etc. Recommendations and findings are required. It's quite an involved and lengthy process. The coroner will hand down his findings also. Some cases become legal cases in the end depending on the circumstances.

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  4. #343
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thermolicious View Post
    True but when my child is sick I don't go to a pead I go to a general practitioner who specializes in general practise much like a midwife who specializes in normal maternal and newborn health, both are qualified to recognize when things are out of their scope of care aren't they?
    When my son was born he had a congenital heart problem which wasn't picked up while pregnant. My son came out blue and not breathing, I was so lucky my paed was with me and began CPR on ds. He was put on a ventilator and I truly believe if he wasnt there ds wouldn't be here today. The amount of medical attention ds needed upon arrival no other person in that room would of been able to perform. That's why I am so thankful towards the medical profession.

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  6. #344
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    I think after awhile if your choices or the way you do things are attacked enough you end up on the defensive even if you don't mean to be. Maybe that is what has happened to her?

    I know it has happened to me with regards to FFing. Anytime a thread even starts about bfing vs ffing my blood boils and its all on

    But you are right - she is *****ing about judgemental mothers and then being on herself.

  7. #345
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimberleygal1 View Post
    Yes and yes. Ok I will give the shortest answer possible. So the clinical governance team are notified of the death. An incident form is filled out. The death is placed on a specific database. The risk manager then has a case review with the relevant parties involved in the care of the patient to determine what/if anything went wrong, how it could have been managed better, what processes need to be put in place etc. Recommendations and findings are required. It's quite an involved and lengthy process. The coroner will hand down his findings also. Some cases become legal cases in the end depending on the circumstances.
    So does every case go to the coroner? What about if the parties involved decide on a settlement? When does that happen and how does a silent claus (no idea if that's the right term) factor in on the coroners voice? Does it mean that the whole case is hush hush or is the coronial investigation a public event?

  8. #346
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alimia View Post
    When my son was born he had a congenital heart problem which wasn't picked up while pregnant. My son came out blue and not breathing, I was so lucky my paed was with me and began CPR on ds. He was put on a ventilator and I truly believe if he wasnt there ds wouldn't be here today. The amount of medical attention ds needed upon arrival no other person in that room would of been able to perform. That's why I am so thankful towards the medical profession.
    genuine question. If it wasn't picked up, how did your paed know to be there and be able ot give cpr immediately? I only ask because a pead in a birth isn't normal practice unless there is a pre existing condition they know will need immediate assistance?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lily of the Nile View Post
    lost half my post.
    During my vbac I also had to wait for a birthing suite and was stuck in emergency, no monitoring, no canulas, I had nothing they kept harping on about that was so detrimental to a vbac, apparently being short staff meant I was now safe? It's a joke. All the theatres were full, had I had a rupture what would have happened? I made it into the birthing suite when I started to push.

    I've had 2 babies and never had a paed look over them? Even when my ds had a high fever and was in the nursery for a while. midwives look over the babies, peads aren't present at all births, thats ridiculous.

    And people need to stop calling me a birthzilla cause its shi!tting me up the wall and I'll start with my own names.....
    No they are only present at c-sections . A paed does ck the baby before discharged.

  10. #348
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alimia View Post
    When my son was born he had a congenital heart problem which wasn't picked up while pregnant. My son came out blue and not breathing, I was so lucky my paed was with me and began CPR on ds. He was put on a ventilator and I truly believe if he wasnt there ds wouldn't be here today. The amount of medical attention ds needed upon arrival no other person in that room would of been able to perform. That's why I am so thankful towards the medical profession.
    I don't know if this posted because it's playing up.
    But I'll ask again, genuine question. How did your paed know to be at the birth waiting to do cpr if it wasn't picked up before her was born?

  11. #349
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    Quote Originally Posted by diesal444 View Post
    I think her term "birthzilla" is hilarious!
    I'm proud to be what she would consider a " birthzilla".
    I am proud that I armed myself with knowledge and insight in what was to me the most empowering amazing experience I will ever know.
    I think her suggestion that " birthzillas" put their plan before the health of themselves or their baby is extremely insulting. No woman would do that, I don't care what anyone says.
    I'm sorry but this whole idea of " who cares how the baby comes out" is so wrong in my opinion.
    I care, I love to hear others birth experiences whether they are bad or great because it helps me understand how different things can be. I want to hear about choices women have made whether it be about their placenta or their homebirth or their c/s.
    It opens my mind to the world and what's wrong with that? Nothing!
    Birthzillas ARE women who put the plan above anything else. That's her point.

    I love to hear about other people's birth experiences too. I think the process of birth is vitally important - i'd never minimise it.

    But I don't think HOW someone birthed (vaginal, c/s, freebirth, while dancing on the top of a mountain) defines them as a woman or a mother. And the way I read her piece is that she feels the same way.

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  13. #350
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    Quote Originally Posted by dreadlockfairy View Post
    Can I just say - anyone who thinks natural labour instantly destroys their lady bits & they are happy to have avoided it (oh and their husband lol of course how could I forget) is a bit of a dumb-as$. It's sad that women see birth as a competition. I agree OP - healthy baby & mother is most important.
    My dh told me he appreciates down there all the more after witnessing what it went through. He is amazed


 

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