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  1. #1
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    Default After school activities for kids with Aspergers?

    For those with older kids with Aspergers, what kind of activities do they do if any?

    My XH just rang and I think the dx has finally hit him, he is freaking out about high school especially but also is re-thinking after school activities for DS.
    He has done rugby league (he was waaay too hypersensitive for that), auskick (again, too sensitive and anxious), and now does soccer. He likes soccer, but is still too anxious about tackling and getting in there to fight for the ball. But I will let him continue soccer if he wants. He also does gymnastics, but doesn't have the body strength to progress past the beginning levels, and now all his friends are moving on, and all that's left in the class are "naughty kids" which, again, he is too sensitive to enjoy being around them. He wants to quit gymnastics next term.
    He does swimming too but doesn't like it, and I will allow him to quit that when he gets up to squads.

    So, try as I might to get him to do team sports to learn 'team spirit', he just isn't really into team stuff, and XH and I are thinking we should stop getting him to try all the 'usual' stuff, and find something that suits him. Something for brainy, nerdy, quiet, reserved and sensitive kids.

    Which is what exactly?
    XH suggested scouts? Which sounds ok but then some of the things they do might be abit anxiety-producing!
    I thought of an instrument but probably can't really afford it.
    I also thought of golf which he showed some interest in when he was younger.

    When I ask him what he wants to do, he says he doesn't know and thinks he's in trouble for changing his mind every year (which he's not btw!).

    He does want to do something though. And I think it would be good for him to have some kind of skill, once I finally find what it is he's in to.

    Any ideas?

    TIA

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    Subscribing till I can have a really good think, I hope I can give some good suggestion shortly

    I will say though the people who I have supported with mild to sever ID's love bowling and a few of them have gone onto represent the state etc.

    Does your local council have an Access for All Abilities co-ordinator?
    Oh and how old is DS so I can think of some age appropriate activities

  3. #3
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    Thanks Clucky. DS is 9.5yo. Haven't heard of the council thing, and just tried to search their website and nothing came up.

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    Sorry I don't have a boy so no real help with actual activities. Maybe see if there is some things he can go look at though or some may let him do a free trial first to see if he likes it.

    But I noticed the bit you said about gymnastics and not moving up and being stuck in a class with the naughty kids.

    Does he like gymnastics otherwise? Because there are other gymnastics clubs that aren't set out like that.

    My girls go to a little gymnastics club through a Youth Club. It's a teeny gym and hasn't got all the equipment that other gyms have. And it only has 3 classes (4 including the Kindy Gym). First 2 classes are recreational and mostly based on age although there are a couple of girls the same age as my twins in the earlier class as it works better time wise for them.

    DD3 goes to the 2nd class while DD1 & DD2 go to the 3rd class as they want to do Levels. (Coach has to agree if they want to do the Levels class) The recreational classes still have skills to complete and their coach gives them certificates when they complete each level. Doesn't matter what each kid is up to as they work on what they are up to. The Actual Levels kids do competitions and have routines to learn etc while the recreational kids just have a bunch of skills to learn that get stamped on their card when they can do them.

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    My nephews/niece are part of an all-abilities basketball squad. There is also a swimming class and dance classes in the same area.

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    My daughter has tried AFL, basketball and soccer. Fail. She did much better at trampoline sports, little athletics, swimming and gymnastics. Individual sports for her lol.

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    What about dance - I know a few aspergers kids that do hip hop and LOVE it (one boy is yr7, another yr8).

  8. #8
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    Basketball was another high priority sport for the people I supported to
    Karate might be another good choice too, they are structured classes etc, my neuce

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    Many aspegers kids have a special interest. If your DS has one maybe you could go with something along those lines. Look for activities that are very structured where he can go each time and know exactly what to expect. You could also see if he wants to do volunteer type stuff. The RFS in my area often have cadet clubs who are the young kids. They do training and stuff but just dont go out on calls at all. Its teamwork without actually getting too close and without a lot of physical contact.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cluky79 View Post
    Basketball was another high priority sport for the people I supported to
    Karate might be another good choice too, they are structured classes etc, my neuce
    Hmm sorry the iPad went on strike lol

    My niece who is on the spectrum loved karate although she didn't quite understand why she was being taught how to hurt people (in her words) however she still enjoyed attending classes and loved learning everything but would not spa anyone.

    I will be back with some more help tomorrow as my brains a little fried tonight lol

    Also maybe just google access for all abilities in your local area and something should pop up, I will leave you with a link to an organization in Vic that do the access for all abilities here and it might be able to help give you some ideas to resource something in your local area

    http://www.leisurelinkup.info/


 

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