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  1. #21
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    I lived overseas for 8 years and most of the time told people I was kiwi out of embarrassment (I lived in one of Australia's 'playgrounds' at the time).

    I married an Asian - wow, didn't I quickly discover how racist 90% of my friends and family were! Let alone joe blow down the street calling me a chink lover and telling my husband to go home ...

    I live in a very affluent area of Sydney.

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    I remember the film crew of this series got attacked by an aboriginal woman when filming in a remote location, I wonder if that will be on there, lol?

    A friend showed me the website "stormfront.org" the other day and it's sad to say there's probably thousands of Australians on there. We definitely don't have a good record but how can a nationality be anymore racist than another? Australians just seem to be more sensitive about epithets for some reason.
    Last edited by wantingtostart; 20-06-2012 at 13:25.

  3. #23
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    Having lived in other countries (UK, Middle East, US), Australia pales in comparison to the racism I encountered there. I was especially taken aback by the deep division between black and white in the States. It was very blatant.

    I also find that on many occasions racism is misunderstood for miscommunication.

    My neighbour, for example, is terrified of Africans. Won't go near them. Does this make her racist? No, to me it makes her fearful and I feel there is a difference.

    I have seen programs like this before. I won't be watching this program.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttoneska View Post
    Hmm, I don't really see it that way but ok to each their own. I think if you notice you have an ingrained level of racism, otherwise you would just see ppl.
    I agree with you totally. Buttoneska.
    I use race to describe people like" the Asian lady up the street." if the person was not Asian I would say " the lady with the 3 kids in the red house"
    I'm not nasty to different races

  5. #25
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    GluttonForPunishment is offline Bubhub Award Winner - 2011- Most Optimistic Poster and Newbie of the Year Awards
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    Caviar makes a really good point there. What is racist and what is justifiable fear? For me, I lived some years in a small town with a large aboriginal community. For no other reason than I was white, I would get called a white c***, all the robberies and assaults were caused by them, if you stood up for yourself you were attached by 15 odd "cousins." It was horrendous. I feel safer walking the streets of Brisbane at 2am in the morning than 2pm there!

    Nowadays, if I see a group of aboriginals together, I'll avoid them. Cross the road etc. It's not that I think that they are lower than me, or that I'm better or anything like that. I'm afraid of them, pure and simple. And I have every right to be due to my own experience. Telling me not to is similar to telling a r ape victim to just not be intimidated by men. It's not that easy.

    So what's the answer? I don't know. I'm going to still keep crossing the road though in the meantime.

  6. #26
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    But in Australia, an Asian person is in the minority and when we're describing people we point out the physical aspects of them which might make them more easily identifiable.

    "that tall woman with the dark hair," may mean any number of women. Adding in that she is of asian descent narrows it down a lot more. If I lived in an Asian nation I'd still use race to help describe if the person was a minority. I'd say, "that white woman," if it helped make a better description and narrow it down further.

    Doing that isn't racist. It's just pointing out an obvious physical attribute which helps people figure out who you're talking about.

    Now, when the news tells us a Muslim does something criminal, or an aboriginal man stabbed someone or whatever, I get annoyed. Unless they were telling us this because he is yet to be captured so we should all be on the lookout, there is no reason to pinpoint race or religion. It doesn't serve a purpose.

    Even little kids notice colour differences... Noticing race is no different to noticing height or hair colour or how fat or thin someone is. If you then treat that person differently though, that's when it's racist, IMO.

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    Ohh cannot wait to watch..Its pretty racist to have a show all about how racist all aussies are ..lol.

    But yes I do think that there are some very vocal, racist aussies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    When I moved overseas the first time, something felt really, really odd. I couldn't put my finger on it though - but there was this nagging feeling. And after a few days I realised, that everyone was white. It was just the weirdest thing. I had never really just been surrounded by white people before.
    This happened to me when I moved schools. I went from a very cosmopolitan town that was rich in diversity to a small village where almost everyone was Caucasian and English! There was only one Asian family (i think 3 kids in the school) and a handful of kids other kids who had foreign accents or differing skin colour. Needless to say the school was generally much more racist! I went out with an Asian kid from town and copped a load of sh*t from the lads at school as someone 'saw' us together (like I was trying to hide it! )I grew up with friends of all kinds of race and religion, but I still feel racist sometimes if I'm talking to someone who only knows basic English. This is because I get really embarrased if I can't understand them or vice versa, due to me being shy.
    It really annoys me that I'm like this, because it has meant its taken me a year to get to know my lovely Indian neighbors and missed out on some tasty curries lol (she brought me a chicken curry she had made Monday night and has offered to make more - yum!). Hopefully I can get over myself and make a new friend but I guess it makes me racist that I felt it hard to talk to her until now?

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    I grew up in England and moved here 7 years ago. When I first came here I thought that Australians were more racist than Brits, as I was shocked to hear a lot of racist comments from people I encountered here.

    I discussed it with DH (who is an Aussie), and his view was that Aussies were not more racist than Brits, but were more outspoken about racist views than Brits were.

    I couldn't imagine anyone I knew in England calling someone a "p*ki" or saying something outright racist. However, I've heard so many really offensive comments spoken here that many people seem to accept, or not challenge.

    Maybe DH is right. In England you would probably get lynched for saying something out loud, whereas maybe here it's more widely accepted??? I'm not sure. But I've been pretty disgusted by some of the things I have heard from seemingly nice/ decent people!

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Girl X View Post
    I grew up in England and moved here 7 years ago. When I first came here I thought that Australians were more racist than Brits, as I was shocked to hear a lot of racist comments from people I encountered here.

    I discussed it with DH (who is an Aussie), and his view was that Aussies were not more racist than Brits, but were more outspoken about racist views than Brits were.

    I couldn't imagine anyone I knew in England calling someone a "p*ki" or saying something outright racist. However, I've heard so many really offensive comments spoken here that many people seem to accept, or not challenge.

    Maybe DH is right. In England you would probably get lynched for saying something out loud, whereas maybe here it's more widely accepted??? I'm not sure. But I've been pretty disgusted by some of the things I have heard from seemingly nice/ decent people!

    Its interesting how different it is for everyone.
    My sister is black and the worst and biggest amount of racism, she encountered was in London.


 

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