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  1. #171
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    It can take a little longer for milk to come in after c sec..for no apparent reasons..

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    Yes it can take longer. Especially with a planned cesarean as your body isn't ready to evict bubs yet. So the hormones that usually kick in with labour, the hormones that prepare your body to nourish and feed your child afterwards, are not there. Your body doesn't have a clue of what it is supposed to be doing now that bubs "suddenly" and without warning has gone.

    I expressed for 9 days until my nipples fell off, but only because I was such a stubborn woman, did the doctor eventually decide to give me Motilium.
    She was funny enough, one of those doctors who tried to persuade me to go formula over breast.

  3. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by Misschief View Post
    Yes it can take longer. Especially with a planned cesarean as your body isn't ready to evict bubs yet. So the hormones that usually kick in with labour, the hormones that prepare your body to nourish and feed your child afterwards, are not there. Your body doesn't have a clue of what it is supposed to be doing now that bubs "suddenly" and without warning has gone.
    I used to think this, but I'm not sure that's the way it works. I looked it up before my c-section as I was worried, but found it was more to do with the placenta detaching which sets it all in motion. I'm not 100% sure so maybe someone who knows more can fill us in, but the body still knows it has given birth when it is via a c-section and the hormones are released for feeding when the placenta is absent. Pain and mobility etc might be more to do with milk issues?


    To answer the OP, for me personally my two c-sections (elective) were by far more peaceful, beautiful and pain free compared to my one natural birth. However it is all relative. I had complication free c-sections, with the first one being pain free, second one being slightly painful for recovery but I was still mobile and without a catheter the day of the c-sections.

    My only worry was that with my natural birth I was on an indescribable natural "love" high the second her body was out and I was sad that a c-section the 2nd time meant I had missed out on that level of feeling, as it was less so. However my 3rd baby and another c-section I had the same feeling of being high, lasting for about 48 hours (longer than after DD1 where it lasted about 5 hours) so I now think it was to do with the anxiety and stress I felt having our 2nd one after the trauma of our first, rather than c-section and lack of hormones.

  4. #174
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    It's the initial skin to skin that sets off hormones. It helps you bond, start milk production and dispell the placenta, when the baby is on your chest your body knows the baby is out. It's all a process you don't get with a c/s because the baby and the placenta are manually removed and skin to skin is delayed. Your also on alot of pain meds and if you've had a long labour then c/s your body can go into abit of shock.
    They are starting to recognise the importance of bonding and skin to skin and allowing babies and mothers to stay together during recovery so they can start breastfeeding after a c/s.
    With me, I had the emergency c/s and my milk took 10 days to come in, although I found bf easier and he attached first go no problems and was feeding non stop. But my milk still took a long time to come in.
    Second time, drug free, 2 hrs of skin to skin, as natural as you can get but she didn't feed for 2 days and we struggled. My milk came in day 4, so alot sooner. It didn't make things easier, but if it happened sooner with my son it would have helped alot so I still think the initial skin to skin is the most important thing in initiating milk production.

  5. #175
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    I thought there was a connection between contractions and milk supply, which is why nipple stimulation can trigger labour and why breastfeeding helps your uterus contract post baby?

  6. #176
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Here is a link explaining how milk production works

    http://kellymom.com/pregnancy/bf-prep/milkproduction/

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    It doesn't matter how the placenta comes out, it's just not attached to the mother which starts the process - that's how I read it anyway.

    Lily of the Nile, I had skin to skin immediately after all 3 births. In both of my c-sections they put my baby covered in blood and vernix straight onto me. DD2 crawled to the breast and fed, DS1 didn't. I agree that skin to skin is very important! A little off topic, but anyone doing an elective c-section should ask for skin to skin asap if this is what you want. There is no reason not to do it as soon as they come out if there are no complications with the actual baby. They were a lot happier to do this at my public hospital birth, I had issues telling them I wanted skin to skin in the private hospital with DS, but I ended up getting the paed and midwife on side and my surgeon didn't have a say in it at the time so he lost . My milk did take longer to come in for the first c-section than it did after my first vaginal birth, but my 2nd c-section, 3rd baby it came in the next day.

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    I have had a vaginal birth and a planned c-section (although my waters broke so it was officially classed as an emergency). I have been fortunate enough to have realitively easy, uncomplicated births both times. I would say because of the recovery from the c-section I believe c-sections are just as hard, if not harder in the long run than a vaginal birth. As I said though, I did have uncomplicated, straightforward births.

    In relation to birth trauma, I can't understand people who dismiss it outright and tell people they should basically get over it. I don't have to have experienced a sexual assault to know its real and has life lasting consequences, I dont have to have been to Iraq to know that it can cause significant issues for soldiers, my friend was there when her child stopped breathing and had to be revived in hospital, i dont have to go through that to know that it has long lasting effects, and I don't have to have experienced birth trauma to know its also real and also has long lasting consequences.

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  11. #179
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    headoverfeet is offline The truth will set you free, but first it will **** you off. -Gloria Steinem
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    Quote Originally Posted by GirlsRock View Post
    I have had a vaginal birth and a planned c-section (although my waters broke so it was officially classed as an emergency). I have been fortunate enough to have realitively easy, uncomplicated births both times. I would say because of the recovery from the c-section I believe c-sections are just as hard, if not harder in the long run than a vaginal birth. As I said though, I did have uncomplicated, straightforward births.

    In relation to birth trauma, I can't understand people who dismiss it outright and tell people they should basically get over it. I don't have to have experienced a sexual assault to know its real and has life lasting consequences, I dont have to have been to Iraq to know that it can cause significant issues for soldiers, my friend was there when her child stopped breathing and had to be revived in hospital, i dont have to go through that to know that it has long lasting effects, and I don't have to have experienced birth trauma to know its also real and also has long lasting consequences.
    Did you know more women suffer PTSD from birth than soldiers have from war? Sad huh

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  13. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thermolicious View Post
    Did you know more women suffer PTSD from birth than soldiers have from war? Sad huh
    I didn't know that and yes, it's really really sad.

    I believe my friend who was there when her son stopped breathing is suffering from PTSD. She is very anxious and she gets up to him at least 3 (but often more) times a night to check that he is still breathing. We (her friends) are trying very gently to get her to her GP to start getting some help. She is exhausted.


 

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