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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alimia View Post
    So are you suggesting yours sons Suspecting special needs are due to his birth or the fact that he was born premature??
    Both. His gut issues are due to both prematurity and because he was born via csection. It's very common in babies born via csection because during a vaginal birth a baby swallow bacteria from the mothers vagina which starts off the gut flora. Csection babies don't get this, they essentially have a sterile gut. This can cause leaky gut syndrome where nutrients leak from the gut into the abdominal cavity causing great pain and discomfort.

    His respiratory issues are from using the wrong sized tube during resus. He was resused because he was sedated by the GA. Had I never had a GA he would never have been sedated. We were told by the paed and neonatal nurses that this was their error.

  2. #102
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    Sounds awful you poor thing. Did you deliver him I'm Townsville?

  3. #103
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    I think it is a far more complicated comparison that it sounds. Births can be easy, or hard. But so can c sections.
    My first birth was extremely complicated. 3 days extreme labour followed by complication in an attempted vaginal birth that resulted in tearing and still ended in a cs. Then complications with the epi that meant I had no movement at all for over 12 hours.
    My second was a planned cs. Partially due to my placenta being close then when it moved I wasn't emotionally prepared to attempt a vaginal birth after my first birth disaster. The birth was easy. But had a reaction to the spinal so my heart and lungs weren't functioning. Then got hit with after pains which I had no idea were coming and being stuck to machines and unable to breathe made it hard to cope.
    Basically, everyone's situation is very different. Both methods can be easy or horrific.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alimia View Post
    Sounds awful you poor thing. Did you deliver him I'm Townsville?
    Sydney, RPA, bunch of douchebags.

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    beebs  (15-06-2012)

  6. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I'll just answer the pee one for now. When i had a catheter in I remember thinking how awesome it was that I didn't have to pee.
    Me too! I had a catheter for both actually because I a small tear they said it'll really burn so I was glad I had it and didn't have to worry. 5 hrs later when they wanted to take it out I wanted it to stay in!!!!!

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  8. #106
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    To be perfectly honest I don't think this question can be answered with a definitive answer. As seen in previous posts I think both deliveries can be hard. Not one being worse than the other.
    Things can go "wrong" in both types of births but doesn't make one harder than the other.
    Just different....
    I can't comment on c/s as I've never had one but for some reason they scare the cr@p out of me. But that's just me.
    So given a complication free birth that be either c/s or vaginal delivery I think c/s would be harder purely basing this on recovery of major abdominal surgery.
    Purely my opinion remembering I've never experienced a c/s so just my thought process. Xx

  9. #107
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    The comment from a PP about expecting leaky bladders, tearing and special needs children due to vaginal births is upsetting.

    If all children with special needs were born vaginally then the human race wouldn't exist as it is. If all women went through torn perineal areas and broken plumbing then why would women have their 2nd 3rd 4th etc babies over centuries?

    Some women have hard vbs. Others have walk in the park ones. Some women heal easily post surgery, others don't.

    My first vb was hard and long and emotionally exhausting as it was induced. I reacted badly to the epi and only scraped a vb as my ob is bloody awesome. If she wasn't there I would have had a csection. My second vb - Spontaneous drug and instrument free. Exhilarating, empowering and the ability to reach down and 'catch' my daughter as she was born is a moment I'll never forget.

    For my next bub it will be drug free cos now I know the difference.

  10. #108
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    I understand birth trauma. My first son was born after 25 hours of awful labour and I was ripped so much that I tore all the way into my anal sphincter. It still hurts.

    I think now though, I can't even see that as 'trauma'. Its not bloody trauma- DS1 is here, running around and breathing. Trauma is watching your baby being lowered into the ground.

    There is so many more "traumatic" things than not having a baby come out of your vagina.

    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I'll just answer the pee one for now. When i had a catheter in I remember thinking how awesome it was that I didn't have to pee.
    Yeah I think the novelty wears off when you have to insert a catheter various times a day just to empty your bladder because you can no longer do it normally. There is a few women on here who have to suffer like that every single day.

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    TimTamsandTea  (16-06-2012)

  12. #109
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    Oh and I agree that a NORMAL, UNCOMPLICATED vaginal birth is always going to be better than a cesarean. But it doesn't really matter in the long run- we are all mothers regardless of how the baby was born.

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    Benji  (15-06-2012),cluckcluck  (15-06-2012),Koberose  (15-06-2012),TimTamsandTea  (16-06-2012)

  14. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lemonhead View Post
    I understand birth trauma. My first son was born after 25 hours of awful labour and I was ripped so much that I tore all the way into my anal sphincter. It still hurts.

    I think now though, I can't even see that as 'trauma'. Its not bloody trauma- DS1 is here, running around and breathing. Trauma is watching your baby being lowered into the ground.

    There is so many more "traumatic" things than not having a baby come out of your vagina.


    .


 

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