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  1. #1
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    Default Throwing things

    My 15 month old has just started throwing things. How can I stop him from throwing things like the remote or phones but still allow tossing balls? I have tried no in a firm voice, removing what he is throwing, smacking him on the hand, etc but it doesn't seem to work. What do other people do on this situation?

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    I would like to know to thanks . I have a 16 month old boy whose does it . My first bub didn't do it .
    I understand how you feel Mopoke !!

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    Keep phones out of reach and ignore. It's a game for then at that age IMO.

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to BigRedV For This Useful Post:

    Mopoke  (05-06-2012),ShanandBoc  (05-06-2012)

  5. #4
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    What are the circumstances under which he is throwing things? Is it just for fun during play or is it when he is throwing a tantrum? Throwing things during play is a way of finding more information out about it much like the 'I drop you fetch' game that young babies are so fond of. They are exploring the properties of the item and how much control they can exert over you at the same time. I agree with keeping easily broken things waaay out of reach.

    If he is throwing stuff in a tantrum, put him in his room so he is only breaking his own stuff and then let him go for it till he is done. That type of throwing is only for attention so dont give it to him.

    If he is throwing stuff just for fun then persistence and patience is your friend. Its a very stage/age appropriate thing even if it is really annoying. Just keep repeating "phones are not for throwing" etc. in a calm firm voice and move the child on to something else like a ball for example when you can say "balls are for throwing". If he persists in an effort to annoy and get attention you can try the 1,2,3 thing e.g. "phones are not for throwing. Thats one" and hold up one finger in front of his eyes as you take away the phone. Then "remotes are not for throwing. Thats two" and hold up the two fingers as you take away the remote. Then "blocks are not for throwing. Thats three." and take the blocks off him and walk him calmly to a quiet place where he can read a book for awhile or sit quietly to make him forget all about his desire to throw things.
    The idea is to make the association 'you throw toys, you are not allowed to play with those toys.' Its a long process but it is effective. I used to work with 1 - 2 yr olds till the start of this year (now its the 4 & 5 yr olds) and they all did this as some point and this worked well for me.

    Good luck!

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    First, i dont keep anything breakable within reach. If I forget and leave the remote out I will remove it and say something like we throw balls, not the remote. But I'd never punish him for it, bc I see it as being my fault for leaving it out. If its something like a train, which I don't want him to throw I usually just say 'The train is not for throwing, you can push the train like this, see? If you choose to throw the train you choose to be all done' Then if he throws it again I say something like 'You are throwing the train which tells me you're all done playing with it. I'll take it away now.' Then I take it away and he quickly learns that throwing things does not end well. No need for punishment, just move on. Kids learn by cause and effect. But to be honest, every child goes through this and it will pass. It's best to keep important things out of reach.


 

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