+ Reply to Thread
Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 4567 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 66
  1. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    19,776
    Thanks
    5,212
    Thanked
    7,063
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    I heard that mother ease/baby ease is actually better for babies (not children). They respond better to the 'baby talk'. I don't like the 'dwink' etc but the softer, high pitch, excited tone for babies actually makes a lot of sense to me than talking to them as you would your husband or older children.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,700
    Thanks
    358
    Thanked
    503
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    Thank you Regina, lots of people don't seem to understand the importance if age appropriate language and it bugs me when people say things like 'oh I never did baby talk' as it's actually really important! It's important to use normal language too, but language is like building blocks, you need to start with the basics. Do people start off reading Tolstoy to their babies? Well, maybe, but that doesn't mean you don't also read board books.

    Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710a using BubHub
    Not sure what Tolstoy is
    But Ds has had books like the petter rabbit library done from birth, i'm not to worried about my lack of baby talk with him, he speaks great.

    Sent from my MB526 using BubHub

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,700
    Thanks
    358
    Thanked
    503
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    See to me 'baby talk' is when you pick a baby up and go boo boo ba ba goo goo ga ga stuff, just noises that mean nothing.

    I spoke to Ds in simple english words from birth, always real words.

    Sent from my MB526 using BubHub

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    6,718
    Thanks
    3,789
    Thanked
    3,838
    Reviews
    17
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 14/11/14100 Posts in a week
    I always talk to DD1 and DD2 while we are at the shops and can have quite a good conversation about all sorts of things with dd1 (she is 7). When dd2 came along I do the same. It might be a one sided conversation at the moment as I ask her what I need to get from the shops. Not long ago I realised I was doing it ALL the time, I think I do it as a way to remember what I need and dd2 seems to love the attention of someone talking to her even if its only to ask her what else we needed. The child health nurse said we should do it because it helps create a bond with the baby and helps them to eventually learn simple words in time. In fact she said you should do a running commentary of your day because it helps baby to learn the language and be social from an early age.

    Anyway, I was at the shops and going throught the check out and joked with the girl that babies give you an excuse to talk to yourself. She went on the comment that there is a regular that shops there that has conversations with an older child that you would only have with a partner and how sad that is cos she must have a mental illness. Thinking about it after I left I thought to myself that I have mature conversations with DD1 about what should we have for dinner or what else do I need to get or you have your own money you want to spend so you look down that isle and i will be down the one next to you, or how her day was or what we are doing on the weekend.

    Anyway, I started to realise maybe it was me she was talking about.
    I dont know how to feel about that. Being thought of as having a mental illness cos I talk to my kids in adult language instead of the irritating over the top, humiliating baby talk some people do. DD1 has a great vocabulary and great conversational skills. When she was about 2 there was thunder and lightening, she asked what was making the noise and light. We could have told her the reason DP and I were told when we were kids that it was god playing drums and using a torch but instead DP and I told her it was the clouds banging together making noise and causing the light to flash. Well she thought we were silly and said No really what is causing it. For her to actually believe us we had to give her a detailed explaination of a build up of static electricy and the air pressure etc etc It had to be really technical. We even had to make stuff up to make our explanantion believable for her cos she thought we were making it up. We have never had an innapropriate conversation with her or done the whole goo goo gaa gaa baby talk with her and her language skills are great. She loves science and knowing how things work and understands why fruit and vegetables are better for you than fast food take away because we have talked about it from day 1 literally.

    ETA: I must add that I too consider baby talk as being goo goo gaa gaa and sounds that have no meaning and are just complete and utter nonsense. I dont consider mumumum or dadadadad or yum yum yum as baby talk as they are repeatitive sounds of actual words.
    Last edited by DesperatelySeekingSleep; 06-06-2012 at 12:29.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Mackay
    Posts
    6,275
    Thanks
    809
    Thanked
    2,399
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    I have always spoken to my daughters as adults. None of the baby talk cr@p for us.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wollondilly Shire
    Posts
    295
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked
    116
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    Thank you Regina, lots of people don't seem to understand the importance if age appropriate language and it bugs me when people say things like 'oh I never did baby talk' as it's actually really important! It's important to use normal language too, but language is like building blocks, you need to start with the basics. Do people start off reading Tolstoy to their babies? Well, maybe, but that doesn't mean you don't also read board books.

    Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710a using BubHub
    I don't think anyone is implying they are reading War and Peace to their toddlers. I think what most people are saying is they speak to their children using actual language rather than made up, "cutesy" sounding words. In reading my DD a board book - for example - I read "Dog" "Cat" and "Sheep" not "puppy-wuppy" "pussy-wussy" or "Baa-lamb". In talking to her, I speak as if I am having a conversation - albeit, mostly one sided and over her head - "Goodmorning sweet girl. Did you sleep well? What shall we do today?"
    There are no goo-goo's or gaa-gaa's.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Qld
    Posts
    26,930
    Thanks
    2,736
    Thanked
    6,743
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Baby-Talk, to me, is "Bubba want a dinkie," Instead of "Would you like a drink?" It's not something that comes naturally to me (and IMO, that's a bit of a "thank god," thing because I loathe it).

    I still talked to my daughter in basic terms too though, when I was trying to teach her something, "Oven - HOT! OUCH!" or whatever. I also talk to babies in a higher, more sing-song voice than I'd talk to others... but I personally don't count that as baby-talk. I count that as me altering my tone of voice to cater to my audience (same as I'd talk to DP and an elderly woman differently, for example).

    I'm satisfied with my lack of "goo-gaa," in DD's younger years - she speaks fabulously and had a great vocabulary. She never had speech issues, so I'm not really sure that my lack of babbling back had any real negative impact.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,846
    Thanks
    6,200
    Thanked
    16,888
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    Nah no War and Peace here, just basic age appropriate words and sentences. Would you like a drink? are you tired? I love you honey. That sort of thing. As I said people aren't referring to babbling but the cutsey type talk. I'm well aware babbling is normal and how babies learn to speak.

    Each to their own. But the above type of talking never got a look in, in our house and I believe it's detrimental to good speech. JMO

  9. #59
    FearlessLeader's Avatar
    FearlessLeader is offline Winner 2013 - Most Memorable Thread
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    10,724
    Thanks
    2,498
    Thanked
    9,116
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    I am confused as I think people have different ideas of baby talk. But people have said they speak the same to their toddler as they would to an adult, all the time. I think that's not helpful. I don't like 'widdle dwinkies' either.

    Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710a using BubHub

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,846
    Thanks
    6,200
    Thanked
    16,888
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    I guess we aren't all the same in this thread. I wouldn't talk to a 12 month old using the same big words I use with DH.... although I do with my 7 going on 8yo. She then asks what the word means, I tell her, and then down the track she'll use it in it's correct context. So age appropriate. I want my kids as they get older to extend themselves and ask what words mean that's how they learn

    and 'widdle dwinkies" *shudders* I knew someone that spoke that way to her child and the poor little boy at 3-4 was talking like that too


 

Similar Threads

  1. Older child at the birth. Yes or no?
    By Ellyjan10 in forum Birth Stories
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 10-03-2013, 08:31
  2. When did your child start talking?
    By MissWinter in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 17-02-2012, 00:23

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Shapland Swim Schools
Shapland's at participating schools offer free baby orientation classes once a month - no cost no catches. Your baby will be introduced to our "natural effects" orientation program develop by Shapland's over 3 generations, its gentle and enjoyable.
sales & new stuffsee all
The Health Hub
Give a new mum a fitness boost for Christmas & New Year. Studio-based, small group training sessions - cardio, strength, core, Pilates & boxing. Choice of 16 hrs per week, flexible-arrival feature - bubs & kids welcome! Gift vouchers available.
featured supporter
Heinz Baby Basics
Our BPA Free range offers you a choice for every stage of your baby’s feeding development. You’ll love our brilliant colours, inspired designs and innovative features. Heinz Baby Basics caters for your baby’s needs!
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!